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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Intact pituitary function is decisive for the catabolic response to TNF-? - studies of protein, glucose and fatty acid metabolism in hypopituitary and healthy subjects.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2014
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Context: TNF-? generates inflammatory responses and insulin resistance, lipolysis and protein breakdown. It is unclear whether these changes depend on intact hypothalamo-pituitary stress hormone responses triggering release of cortisol and growth hormone. Objective: To define differential effects of TNF-? on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in hypopituitary patients (without intact hypothalamo-pituitary axis) and healthy controls. Design: Randomized, placebo controlled, single-blinded. Setting, participants and intervention: We studied eight hypopituitary patients(HP) and eight matched control subjects(CTR) twice during 4-h basal and 2-h hyperinsulinemic clamp conditions with isotope dilution during infusion of saline or TNF-?(12 ng/kg/h) for 6 h. Main outcome measures: Phenylalanine, urea, palmitate and glucose fluxes and fat biopsies in basal and clamp periods. Results: TNF-? infusion significantly increased cortisol and GH levels in CTR but not in HP. TNF-? increased phenylalanine fluxes in both groups, the increase being significantly greater in CTR, and raised urea flux by 40 % in CTR without any alteration in HP. Endogenous glucose production(EGP) was elevated in CTR compared to HP after TNF-? administration, whereas insulin sensitivity remained similarly unaffected in both groups. TNF-? increased whole body palmitate fluxes and decreased palmitate specific activity in CTR, but not in HP without statistical difference between groups. We did not detect significant effects TNF-? on lipase expression or regulation in fat. Conclusions: TNF-? increased both urea and amino acid fluxes and EGP significantly more in CTR compared to HP, suggesting that increases in endogenous cortisol and GH release are significant components of the metabolic response to TNF-?.
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Vibration and Rotation During Biaxial Pressure Algometry Is Related with Decreased and Increased Pain Sensations.
Pain Med
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2014
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During palpation, the pressure intensity and direction include minor deviations suggesting that standardized variations of the pressure intensity during pressure algometry may optimize the stimulus efficacy. This study examined the perceived pain outcome and reliability of a biaxial (bidirectional) algometer exerting rotational and vibratory stimulation on top of the basic pressure.
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Association Between Experimental Pain Biomarkers and Serological Markers in Patients With Different Degree of Painful Knee Osteoarthritis.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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Objective: The present study aimed to link pain mechanisms (sensitization) and biochemical markers for cartilage, bone, and inflammation in patients with knee pain. Methods: 281 participants with different degrees of knee pain intensity and radiological findings (Kellgren & Lawrence (KL)) were included. Structurally related serological biomarkers were measured from serum: high sensitive (hs) CRP (C-reactive protein), CRPM (MMP-mediated [matrix metalloproteinase] breakdown of CRP), C1M, C2M, and C3M (MMP-mediated collagen Type I, II, and III degradation). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) (peripheral and spreading sensitization), temporal summation (TS) of pain, and conditioning pain modulation (CPM) (both representing generalized sensitization) were assessed. For each pain parameter participants were categorized as most- or least-sensitized. Results: Correlations were found between the pain biomarkers (PPT, TS, CPM) and maximal pain intensity during the last 24 hours. Significant associations were found between most of the serologic biomarkers. High CRPM was associated with centralized sensitization (TS and CPM). None of the serologic markers correlated with knee pain intensity or duration. Only hsCRP correlated with KL. More females were present in the most-sensitized group and more males in the least-sensitized group. Conclusion: A platform of mechanistic pain bio-markers in combination with structure related serological biomarkers provides new possibilities of understanding how OA related structural features may be associated with pain and pain sensitization. The study showed significant correlations between central pain sensitization and MMP-dependent degradation of CRP as a possible measure for chronic inflammation. Future pain association studies should include biomarkers representing more specifically the local joint environment. © 2014 American College of Rheumatology.
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A photolabile linker for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide hydrazides and heterocycles.
Org. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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A photolabile hydrazine linker for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide hydrazides and hydrazine-derived heterocycles is presented. The developed protocols enable the efficient synthesis of structurally diverse peptide hydrazides derived from the standard amino acids, including those with side-chain protected residues at the C-terminal of the resulting peptide hydrazide, and are useful for the synthesis of dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazoles. The linker is compatible with most commonly used coupling reagents and protecting groups for solid-phase peptide synthesis.
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Comparative Systems Biology Analysis To Study the Mode of Action of the Isothiocyanate Compound Iberin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2014
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Food is now recognized as a natural resource of novel antimicrobial agents, including those that target the virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens. Iberin, an isothiocyanate compound from horseradish, was recently identified as a quorum-sensing inhibitor (QSI) of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we used a comparative systems biology approach to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the effects of iberin on QS and virulence factor expression of P. aeruginosa. Our study shows that the two systems biology methods used (i.e., RNA sequencing and proteomics) complement each other and provide a thorough overview of the impact of iberin on P. aeruginosa. RNA sequencing-based transcriptomics showed that iberin inhibits the expression of the GacA-dependent small regulatory RNAs RsmY and RsmZ; this was verified by using gfp-based transcriptional reporter fusions with the rsmY or rsmZ promoter regions. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics showed that iberin reduces the abundance of the LadS protein, an activator of GacS. Taken together, the findings suggest that the mode of QS inhibition in iberin is through downregulation of the Gac/Rsm QS network, which in turn leads to the repression of QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyoverdine, chitinase, and protease IV. Lastly, as expected from the observed repression of small regulatory RNA synthesis, we also show that iberin effectively reduces biofilm formation. This suggests that small regulatory RNAs might serve as potential targets in the future development of therapies against pathogens that use QS for controlling virulence factor expression and assume the biofilm mode of growth in the process of causing disease.
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Potential interaction of experimental knee pain and laterally wedged insoles for knee off-loading during walking.
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Laterally wedged insoles are one of the gait modifications potentially slowing down progression of medial knee osteoarthritis. Clinical studies have, however, found large individual differences in the biomechanical effect and an insufficient pain reduction. To clarify if and how pain mediates mechanical changes during gait the current study investigated how acute experimental knee pain changes the mechanical effect of laterally wedged insoles in healthy subjects during walking.
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Experimental Pelvic Pain Impairs the Performance During the Active Straight Leg Raise Test and Causes Excessive Muscle Stabilization.
Clin J Pain
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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The Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) test is widely used clinically to assess severity of lumbopelvic pain due to decreased stability of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ). This study aimed to bypass the influence of decreased SIJ stability on the ASLR test by investigating the effect of experimental pelvic pain and hyperalgesia on the outcome of the ASLR test.
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Tracer kinetic model selection for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of locally advanced cervical cancer.
Acta Oncol
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2014
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Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) offers a unique capability to probe tumour microvasculature. Different analysis of the acquired data will possibly lead to different conclusions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate under which conditions the Tofts (TM), extended Tofts (ETM), compartmental tissue uptake model (C-TU) and 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM) were the optimal tracer kinetic models (TKMs) for the analysis of DCE-MRI in patients with cervical cancer.
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Synthesis of heterocycles through transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization reactions.
Chemistry
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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Metal-catalyzed isomerization of N- and O-allylic systems is emerging as an effective method to form synthetically useful iminium and oxocarbenium intermediates. In the presence of tethered nucleophiles, several recent examples illuminate this approach as a powerful strategy for the synthesis of structurally complex and diverse heterocycles. In this Concept article, we attempt to cover this area of research through a selection of recent versatile examples.
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Motor inhibition affects the speed but not accuracy of aimed limb movements in an insect.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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When reaching toward a target, human subjects use slower movements to achieve higher accuracy, and this can be accompanied by increased limb impedance (stiffness, viscosity) that stabilizes movements against motor noise and external perturbation. In arthropods, the activity of common inhibitory motor neurons influences limb impedance, so we hypothesized that this might provide a mechanism for speed and accuracy control of aimed movements in insects. We recorded simultaneously from excitatory leg motor neurons and from an identified common inhibitory motor neuron (CI1) in locusts that performed natural aimed scratching movements. We related limb movement kinematics to recorded motor activity and demonstrate that imposed alterations in the activity of CI1 influenced these kinematics. We manipulated the activity of CI1 by injecting depolarizing or hyperpolarizing current or killing the cell using laser photoablation. Naturally higher levels of inhibitory activity accompanied faster movements. Experimentally biasing the firing rate downward, or stopping firing completely, led to slower movements mediated by changes at several joints of the limb. Despite this, we found no effect on overall movement accuracy. We conclude that inhibitory modulation of joint stiffness has effects across most of the working range of the insect limb, with a pronounced effect on the overall velocity of natural movements independent of their accuracy. Passive joint forces that are greatest at extreme joint angles may enhance accuracy and are not affected by motor inhibition.
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Synthesis of a Natural Product-Like Compound Collection through Oxidative Cleavage and Cyclization of Linear Peptides.
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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Massive efforts in molecular library synthesis have strived for the development of synthesis methodology which systematically delivers natural product-like compounds of high spatial complexity. Herein, we present a conceptually simple approach that builds on the power of solid-phase peptide synthesis to assemble precursor peptides (oligomers) designed to undergo oxidative cascade reactions. By harnessing the structural side-chain diversity and inherent stereochemical features offered by readily available amino acids (monomers), a proof-of-concept collection of 54 skeletally and stereochemically diverse compounds was generated, and selected compounds were elaborated into isoform-selective metalloprotease inhibitors.
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Bone hyperalgesia after mechanical impact stimulation: A human experimental pain model.
Somatosens Mot Res
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Abstract Hyperalgesia in different musculoskeletal structures including bones is a major clinical problem. An experimental bone hyperalgesia model was developed in the present study. Hyperalgesia was induced by three different weights impacted on the shinbone in 16 healthy male and female subjects. The mechanical impact pain threshold (IPT) was measured as the height from which three weights (165, 330, and 660?g) should be dropped to elicit pain at the shinbone. Temporal summation of pain to repeated impact stimuli was assessed. All these stimuli caused bone hyperalgesia. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was assessed by a computerized pressure algometer using two different probes (1.0 and 0.5?cm(2)). All parameters were recorded before (0), 24, 72, and 96?h after the initial stimulations. The IPTs were lowest 24?h after hyperalgesia induction for all three weights and the effect lasted up to 72?h (p?
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Dissecting adipose tissue lipolysis: molecular regulation and implications for metabolic disease.
J. Mol. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2014
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Lipolysis is the process by which triglycerides (TGs) are hydrolyzed to free fatty acids (FFAs) and glycerol. In adipocytes, this is achieved by sequential action of adipose TG lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and monoglyceride lipase. The activity in the lipolytic pathway is tightly regulated by hormonal and nutritional factors. Under conditions of negative energy balance such as fasting and exercise, stimulation of lipolysis results in a profound increase in FFA release from adipose tissue (AT). This response is crucial in order to provide the organism with a sufficient supply of substrate for oxidative metabolism. However, failure to efficiently suppress lipolysis when FFA demands are low can have serious metabolic consequences and is believed to be a key mechanism in the development of type 2 diabetes in obesity. As the discovery of ATGL in 2004, substantial progress has been made in the delineation of the remarkable complexity of the regulatory network controlling adipocyte lipolysis. Notably, regulatory mechanisms have been identified on multiple levels of the lipolytic pathway, including gene transcription and translation, post-translational modifications, intracellular localization, protein-protein interactions, and protein stability/degradation. Here, we provide an overview of the recent advances in the field of AT lipolysis with particular focus on the molecular regulation of the two main lipases, ATGL and HSL, and the intracellular and extracellular signals affecting their activity.
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Synthesis of oxacyclic scaffolds via dual ruthenium hydride/Brønsted acid-catalyzed isomerization/cyclization of allylic ethers.
Chemistry
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2014
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A ruthenium hydride/Brønsted acid-catalyzed tandem sequence is reported for the synthesis of 1,3,4,9-tetrahydropyrano[3,4-b]indoles (THPIs) and related oxacyclic scaffolds. The process was designed on the premise that readily available allylic ethers would undergo sequential isomerization, first to enol ethers (Ru catalysis), then to oxocarbenium ions (Brønsted acid catalysis) amenable to endo?cyclization with tethered nucleophiles. This methodology provides not only an attractive alternative to the traditional oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction for the synthesis of THPIs, but also convenient access to THPI congeners and other important oxacycles such as acetals.
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Intra-Articular Analgesia and Steroid Reduce Pain Sensitivity in Knee OA Patients: An Interventional Cohort Study.
Pain Res Treat
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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Objectives. To assess the effects of intra-articular therapy on pain sensitivity in the knee and surrounding tissues in knee OA patients. Methods. Twenty-five knee OA patients with symptomatic knee OA were included in this interventional cohort study. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded before, immediately after, and two weeks after ultrasound guided intra-articular injection of lidocaine combined with glucocorticosteroid. Computer-controlled and manual pressure algometers were used to assess PPT on the knee, vastus lateralis, tibialis anterior, and the extensor carpi radialis longus muscles (control site). Results. Significantly increased PPTs were found following intra-articular injection, at both the knee (P?
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Translational pain biomarkers in the early development of new neurotherapeutics for pain management.
Expert Rev Neurother
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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Translation of the analgesic efficacy of investigational neurotherapeutics from pre-clinical pain models into clinical trial phases is associated with a high risk of failure. Application of human pain biomarkers in early stages of clinical trials can potentially enhance the rate of successful translation, which would eventually reduce both length and costs of drug development after the pre-clinical stage. Human pain biomarkers are based on the standardized activation of pain pathways followed by the assessment of ongoing and paroxysmal pain, plus evoked responses which can be applied to healthy individuals and patients prior to and after pharmacological interventions. This review discusses the rationality and feasibility of advanced human pain biomarkers in early phases of drug development for pain management which is still an unmet medical need.
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Solid-phase synthesis and biological evaluation of N-dipeptido L-homoserine lactones as quorum sensing activators.
Chembiochem
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Bacteria use small signaling molecules to communicate in a process termed "quorum sensing" (QS), which enables the coordination of survival strategies, such as production of virulence factors and biofilm formation. In Gram-negative bacteria, these signaling molecules are a series of N-acylated L-homoserine lactones. With the goal of identifying non-native compounds capable of modulating bacterial QS, a virtual library of N-dipeptido L-homoserine lactones was screened in silico with two different crystal structures of LasR. The 30 most promising hits were synthesized on HMBA-functionalized PEGA resin and released through an efficient acid-mediated cyclative release mechanism. Subsequent screening for modulation of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli identified six moderately strong activators. A follow-up library designed from the preliminary derived structure-activity relationships was synthesized and evaluated for their ability to activate the QS system in this bacterium. This resulted in the identification of another six QS activators (two with low micromolar activity) thus illuminating structural features required for QS modulation.
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Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.
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Exercise therapy reduces pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken)
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2014
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Background: Exercise has beneficial effects on pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), yet the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on pressure pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial participants were assigned to 12 weeks of supervised exercise therapy (ET, 36 sessions), or a no attention control group (CG). Pressure pain sensitivity was assessed by cuff pressure algometry on the calf of the most symptomatic leg. The co-primary outcomes were 1) pressure pain thresholds (PPT), and 2) cumulated visual analogue scale pain scores during constant pressure for 6 minutes at 125% of the PPT as a measure of temporal summation (TS) of pressure pain. Secondary outcomes included self-reported pain using the KOOS questionnaire. Analyses were based on the 'Per-Protocol' population (participants following the protocol). Results: 60 participants were randomized (31 ET/29 CG), and the Per-Protocol population included 48 participants (25 ET/23 CG). At follow-up mean group differences in the change from baseline were 3.1 kPa (95% CI: 0.2 to 6.0; P=0.038) for the PPT, 2,608 mm*s (95%CI: 458 to 4,758; P=0.019) for TS, and 6.8 points (95% CI 1.2 to 12.4; P=0.018), for KOOS pain, all in favor of ET. Conclusion: Pressure pain sensitivity, temporal summation and self-reported pain are reduced among patients completing a 12-week supervised exercise program compared to a no-attention control group. These results demonstrate beneficial effects of exercise on basic pain mechanisms, and further exploration may provide basis for optimized treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01545258 © 2014 American College of Rheumatology.
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A common Greenlandic TBC1D4 variant confers muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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The Greenlandic population, a small and historically isolated founder population comprising about 57,000 inhabitants, has experienced a dramatic increase in type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence during the past 25 years. Motivated by this, we performed association mapping of T2D-related quantitative traits in up to 2,575 Greenlandic individuals without known diabetes. Using array-based genotyping and exome sequencing, we discovered a nonsense p.Arg684Ter variant (in which arginine is replaced by a termination codon) in the gene TBC1D4 with an allele frequency of 17%. Here we show that homozygous carriers of this variant have markedly higher concentrations of plasma glucose (? = 3.8?mmol?l(-1), P = 2.5?×?10(-35)) and serum insulin (? = 165?pmol?l(-1), P = 1.5?×?10(-20)) 2 hours after an oral glucose load compared with individuals with other genotypes (both non-carriers and heterozygous carriers). Furthermore, homozygous carriers have marginally lower concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (? = -0.18 mmol?l(-1), P = 1.1?×?10(-6)) and fasting serum insulin (? = -8.3?pmol?l(-1), P = 0.0014), and their T2D risk is markedly increased (odds ratio (OR) = 10.3, P = 1.6?×?10(-24)). Heterozygous carriers have a moderately higher plasma glucose concentration 2 hours after an oral glucose load than non-carriers (? = 0.43?mmol?l(-1), P = 5.3?×?10(-5)). Analyses of skeletal muscle biopsies showed lower messenger RNA and protein levels of the long isoform of TBC1D4, and lower muscle protein levels of the glucose transporter GLUT4, with increasing number of p.Arg684Ter alleles. These findings are concomitant with a severely decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle, leading to postprandial hyperglycaemia, impaired glucose tolerance and T2D. The observed effect sizes are several times larger than any previous findings in large-scale genome-wide association studies of these traits and constitute further proof of the value of conducting genetic association studies outside the traditional setting of large homogeneous populations.
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Patterns-of-failure after helical tomotherapy-based chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer: implications for CTV margin, elective nodal dose and bilateral parotid sparing.
Oral Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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There is debate about the optimal clinical target volume (CTV) expansion and prophylactic nodal dose (PND) in head and neck IMRT. We evaluated our patterns-of-failure (POF) after helical tomotherapy-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) to assess the oncologic safety of reducing the CTV, PND, and bilateral parotid sparing (BPS).
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Heat-rekindling in UVB-irradiated skin above NGF-sensitized muscle: experimental models of prolonged mechanical hypersensitivity.
Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Experimental models of prolonged pain hypersensitivity in humans are desirable for screening novel analgesic compounds. In this study, heat stimuli were applied in ultraviolet-B (UVB)-irradiated skin and in the UVB-irradiated skin combined with nerve growth factor (NGF)-injected muscle to investigate 1) whether the evoked mechanical hypersensitivity by UVB irradiation would be prolonged or enhanced following heat rekindling, and 2) whether the combination between cutaneous and muscle hypersensitivity may influence the rekindling effects. Skin sensitization was induced in 25 volunteers by UVB irradiation in areas above the upper-trapezius muscle, low-back or forearm. Muscle sensitization was induced in the low back by bilateral injections of NGF. The area of cutaneous hyperalgesia was evaluated 3 days after the irradiation by mechanical pin-prick stimulation whereas the areas of allodynia were evaluated 1, 2 and 3 days after irradiation by von Frey hair assessments. Cutaneous heat stimulation (40°C for 5 min) was performed on the 3(rd) day to investigate its effect on the areas of cutaneous allodynia and hyperalgesia. Findings revealed that 1) allodynia and hyperalgesia developed following UVB irradiation, 2) heat stimulation of the UVB-irradiated skin enlarged both hyperalgesic and allodynic areas (P < 0.01), and 3) muscle sensitization did not influence the effect of UVB on allodynia or the response to heat rekindling. These data suggest that heat rekindling applied to an UVB-sensitized skin can maintain or facilitate allodynia and hyperalgesia for a longer period offering a suitable model for testing analgesic compounds when sufficient duration of time is needed for investigation of drug efficacy.
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A combretastatin-mediated decrease in neutrophil concentration in peripheral blood and the impact on the anti-tumor activity of this drug in two different murine tumor models.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) induces fluctuations in peripheral blood neutrophil concentration. Because neutrophils have the potential to induce both vascular damage and angiogenesis we analyzed neutrophil involvement in the anti-tumoral effects of CA4P in C3H mammary carcinomas in CDF1 mice and in SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H/HeN mice. Flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood before and up to 144 h after CA4P administration (25 and 250 mg/kg) revealed a decrease 1 h after treatment, followed by an early (3-6 h) and a late (>72 h) increase in the granulocyte concentration. We suggest that the early increase (3-6 h) in granulocyte concentration was caused by the initial decrease at 1 h and found that the late increase was associated with tumor size, and hence independent of CA4P. No alterations in neutrophil infiltration into the C3H tumor after CA4P treatment (25 and 250 mg/kg) were found. Correspondingly, neutrophil depletion in vivo, using an anti-neutrophil antibody, followed by CA4P treatment (25 mg/kg) did not increase the necrotic fraction in C3H tumors significantly. However, by increasing the CA4P dose to 250 mg/kg we found a significant increase of 359% in necrotic fraction when compared to neutrophil-depleted mice; in mice with no neutrophil depletion CA4P induced an 89% change indicating that the presence of neutrophils reduced the effect of CA4P. In contrast, neither CA4P nor 1A8 affected the necrotic fraction in the SCCVII tumors significantly. Hence, we suggest that the initial decrease in granulocyte concentration was caused by non-tumor-specific recruitment of neutrophils and that neutrophils may attenuate CA4P-mediated anti-tumor effect in some tumor models.
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Developing suitable buffers to capture transport cycling behavior.
Front Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The association between neighborhood built environment and cycling has received considerable attention in health literature over the last two decades, but different neighborhood definitions have been used and it is unclear which one is most appropriate. Administrative or fixed residential spatial units (e.g., home-buffer-based neighborhoods) are not necessarily representative for environmental exposure. An increased understanding of appropriate neighborhoods is needed. GPS cycling tracks from 78 participants for 7?days form the basis for the development and testing of different neighborhood buffers for transport cycling. The percentage of GPS points per square meter was used as indicator of the effectiveness of a series of different buffer types, including home-based network buffers, shortest route to city center buffers, and city center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers. The results show that GPS tracks can help us understand where people go and stay during the day, which can help us link built environment with cycling. Analysis showed that the further people live from the city center, the more elongated are their GPS tracks, and the better an ellipse-shaped directional buffer captured transport cycling behavior. In conclusion, we argue that in order to be able to link built environment factors with different forms of physical activity, we must study the most likely area people use. In this particular study, to capture transport cycling, with its relatively large radius of action, city center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers yielded better results than traditional home-based network buffer types. The ellipse-shaped buffer types could therefore be considered an alternative to more traditional buffers or administrative units in future studies of transport cycling behavior.
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Accumulation of nano-sized particles in a murine model of angiogenesis.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2013
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To evaluate the ability of nm-scaled iron oxide particles conjugated with Azure A, a classic histological dye, to accumulate in areas of angiogenesis in a recently developed murine angiogenesis model.
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Nanoconfined NaAlH4: prolific effects from increased surface area and pore volume.
Nanoscale
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2013
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Nanoconfinement is a promising technique to improve the properties of nanomaterials such as the kinetics for hydrogen release and uptake and the stability during cycling. Here we present a systematic study of nanoconfined NaAlH4 in nanoporous scaffolds with increasing surface area and pore volume and almost constant pore sizes in the range of 8 to 11 nm. A resorcinol formaldehyde carbon aerogel was CO2-activated under different conditions and provided aerogels with BET surface areas of 704, 1267 and 2246 m(2) g(-1) and total pore volumes of 0.91, 1.30 and 2.21 mL g(-1), respectively. Nanoconfinement of NaAlH4 was achieved by melt infiltration and (27)Al MAS NMR reveals that the respective scaffolds incorporate 68, 82 and 91 wt% NaAlH4, for the above-mentioned samples, while the remaining fraction decomposes to metallic Al indicating that increasing CO2-activation tends to facilitate the infiltration process. The frequencies for the (23)Na and (27)Al MAS NMR centerband resonances from NaAlH4 vary systematically for the infiltrated samples and are shifted towards higher frequency and become more narrow with increasing degree of CO2 activation of the scaffolds. This new effect is attributed to increasing interactions with conduction electrons from increasingly graphite-/graphene-like scaffolds. The bulk versus nanoconfined ratio of NaAlH4 was investigated using Rietveld refinement, revealing that the majority of added NaAlH4 is confined inside the nanopores. The hydrogen desorption kinetics decreased with increasing surface area and the hydrogen storage capacity is more stable and decreases less during continuous hydrogen release and uptake cycles. In fact, the available amount of hydrogen (2.7 wt% H2) was more than doubled compared to the nanoconfinement in the non-activated carbon aerogel (1.3 wt% H2). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that Ti-functionalization of the CO2-activated aerogels combines the high storage capacity with fast hydrogen release kinetics from NaAlH4 which fully decomposes into Na3AlH6 at T? 100 °C.
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Ruthenium Hydride/Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Tandem Isomerization/N-Acyliminium Cyclization Sequence for the Synthesis of Tetrahydro-?-carbolines.
J. Org. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2013
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This paper describes an efficient tandem sequence for the synthesis of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-?-carbolines (THBCs) relying on a ruthenium hydride/Brønsted acid-catalyzed isomerization of allylic amides to N-acyliminium ion intermediates which are trapped by a tethered indole nucleophile. The methodology provides not only a convenient "aldehyde-free" alternative to the classical Pictet-Spengler reaction but also attractive possibilities for total synthesis, including rapid generation of molecular complexity and formation of quaternary stereogenic centers. TBHCs can also be accessed by harnessing the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction to the isomerization/N-acyliminium cyclization sequence. Finally, diastereo- and enantioselective versions of the title reaction have been examined using substrate control (with dr >15: 1) and asymmetric catalysis (ee up to 57%), respectively.
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Safety system for moving coil pressure algometer.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2013
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The threat of safety failure during use of potent actuators is a known problem. The use of such actuators in the field of pressure algometry requires adaptation of safety measures since stimulation is applied to human beings. This design provides an additional safety level required in the field of computer-controlled pressure algometry but in principle its usage is not restricted just to this area. The fuse consists of four parts (inner cylinder, outer cylinder lid, outer cylinder guide, and the gauge screw) which are simple and cheap to manufacture, easy to reassemble once the fuse has been triggered, and gaugeable with commercially available tools. The prototype showed acceptable levels of performance given the intended usage of the stimulation setup, namely increasing and repeated musculoskeletal stimulation. Repeatable range of holding force has been attained for the particular application against a rubber mat surface mimicking musculoskeletal tissue (96% for forces F < 20kg, and 30% for forces 25kg < F ? 35kg).
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Latent Myofascial Trigger Points Are Associated With an Increased Intramuscular Electromyographic Activity During Synergistic Muscle Activation.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2013
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The aim of this study was to evaluate intramuscular muscle activity from a latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) in a synergistic muscle during isometric muscle contraction. Intramuscular activity was recorded with an intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) needle inserted into a latent MTP or a non-MTP in the upper trapezius at rest and during isometric shoulder abduction at 90° performed at 25% of maximum voluntary contraction in 15 healthy subjects. Surface EMG activities were recorded from the middle deltoid muscle and the upper, middle, and lower parts of the trapezius muscle. Maximal pain intensity and referred pain induced by EMG needle insertion and maximal pain intensity during contraction were recorded on a visual analog scale. The results showed that higher visual analog scale scores were observed following needle insertion and during muscle contraction for latent MTPs than non-MTPs (P < .01). The intramuscular EMG activity in the upper trapezius muscle was significantly higher at rest and during shoulder abduction at latent MTPs compared with non-MTPs (P < .001). This study provides evidence that latent MTPs are associated with increased intramuscular, but not surface, EMG amplitude of synergist activation. The increased amplitude of synergistic muscle activation may result in incoherent muscle activation pattern of synergists inducing spatial development of new MTPs and the progress to active MTPs.
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Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents.
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
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Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular bacterial lipases are particularly abundant at sites of infection. Herein it is shown how active or proactive compounds attached to polymeric surfaces using lipase-sensitive linkages, such as fatty acid esters or anhydrides, may be released in response to infection. Proof-of-concept of the responsive material is demonstrated by the bacteria-triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self-regulating system provides the basis for the development of device-relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device.
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Voxelwise comparison of perfusion parameters estimated using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) computed tomography and DCE-magnetic resonance imaging in locally advanced cervical cancer.
Acta Oncol
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2013
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Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging has gained interest as an imaging modality for assessment of tumor characteristics and response to cancer treatment. However, for DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue contrast enhancement may vary depending on imaging sequence and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to compare DCE-MRI to DCE-computed tomography (DCE-CT) as the gold standard.
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Identification of five structurally unrelated quorum-sensing inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a natural-derivative database.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2013
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Bacteria communicate by means of small signal molecules in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). QS enables bacteria to organize their activities at the population level, including the coordinated secretion of virulence factors. Certain small-molecule compounds, known as quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), have been shown to effectively block QS and subsequently attenuate the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as increasing its susceptibility to both antibiotics and the immune system. In this study, a structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) approach was used for the discovery of novel QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies as quorum-sensing inhibitors. Using a live reporter assay for quorum sensing, 5 compounds were found to be able to inhibit QS-regulated gene expression in P. aeruginosa in a dose-dependent manner. The most promising compound, G1, was evaluated by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis, and it was found to significantly affect the abundance of 46 proteins (19 were upregulated; 27 were downregulated) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. It specifically reduced the expression of several quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors, such as protease IV, chitinase, and pyoverdine synthetases. G1 was also able to reduce extracellular DNA release and inhibited the secretion of the virulence factor, elastase, whose expression is regulated by LasR. These results demonstrate the utility of SB-VS for the discovery of target-specific QSIs.
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Ultra-high field 1H magnetic resonance imaging approaches for acute hypoxia.
Acta Oncol
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2013
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Currently, radiation treatments are being optimised based on in vivo imaging of radioresistant, hypoxic tumour areas. This study aimed at detecting nicotinamides reduction of acute hypoxia in a mouse tumour model by two clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods at ultra-high magnetic field strength.
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Comparison of Mono-, Bi-, and Tripolar Configurations for Stimulation and Recording With an Interfascicular Interface.
IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2013
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Previous studies have indicated that electrodes placed between fascicles can provide nerve recruitment with high topological selectivity if the areas of interest in the nerve are separated with passive elements. In this study, we investigated if this separation of fascicles also can provide topologically selective nerve recordings and compared the performance of mono-, bi-, and tripolar configurations for stimulation and recording with an intra-neural interface. The interface was implanted in the sciatic nerve of 10 rabbits and achieved a median selectivity of ? = 0.98- 0.99 for all stimulation configurations, while recording selectivity configurations was in the range of ? = 0.70-0.80 with the monopolar configuration providing the lowest and the average reference configuration the highest recording selectivity. Interfascicular electrodes could provide an interesting addition to the bulk of peripheral nerve interfaces available for neural prosthetic devices. The separation of the nerve into chambers by the passive elements of the electrode could ensure a higher selectivity than comparable cuff electrodes and the intra-neural location could provide an option of targeting mainly central fascicles. Further studies are, however, still required to develop biocompatible electrodes and test their stability and safety in chronic experiments.
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Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.
Acta Physiol (Oxf)
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2013
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Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting.
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A thermodynamic and kinetic study of the heterolytic activation of hydrogen by frustrated borane-amine Lewis pairs.
Dalton Trans
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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Calorimetry is used to measure the reaction enthalpies of hydrogen (H(2)) activation by 2,6-lutidine (Lut), 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TMP), N-methyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (MeTMP), and tri-tert-butylphosphine (TBP) with tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane (BCF). At 6.6 bar H(2) the conversion of the Lewis acid Lewis base pair to the corresponding ionic pair in bromobenzene at 294 K was quantitative in under 60 min. Integration of the heat release from the reaction of the Frustrated Lewis Pair (FLP) with H(2) as a function of time yields a relative rate of hydrogenation in addition to the enthalpy of hydrogenation. The half-lives of hydrogenation range from 230 s with TMP, ?H(H2) = -31.5(0.2) kcal mol(-1), to 1400 s with Lut, ?H(H2) = -23.4(0.4) kcal mol(-1). The (11)B nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of B(C(6)F(5))(3) in bromobenzene exhibits three distinct traits depending on the sterics of the Lewis base; (1) in the presence of pyridine, only the dative bond adduct pyridine-B(C(6)F(5))(3) is observed; (2) in the presence of TMP and MeTMP, only the free B(C(6)F(5))(3) is observed; and (3) in the presence of Lut, both the free B(C(6)F(5))(3) and the Lut-B(C(6)F(5))(3) adduct appear in equilibrium. A measure of the change in K(eq) of Lut + B(C(6)F(5))(3) ? Lut-B(C(6)F(5))(3) as a function of temperature provides thermodynamic properties of the Lewis acid Lewis base adduct, ?H = -17.9(1.0) kcal mol(-1) and a ?S = -49.2(2.5) cal mol(-1) K, suggesting the Lut-B(C(6)F(5))(3) adduct is more stable in bromobenzene than in toluene.
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Repeated intramuscular injections of nerve growth factor induced progressive muscle hyperalgesia, facilitated temporal summation, and expanded pain areas.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2013
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Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to induce deep-tissue mechanical hyperalgesia. In this study it was hypothesised that daily intramuscular injections of NGF produce a progressive manifestation of soreness, mechanical hyperalgesia, and temporal summation of pain. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 12 healthy subjects were injected on 3 days with NGF into the tibialis anterior muscle and with isotonic saline on the contralateral side. Assessments were performed before and after the injections on days 0, 1, and 2, and repeated on days 3, 6, and 10. The self-perceived muscle soreness was assessed on a Likert scale. Computer-controlled pressure algometry was used to assess the pressure pain thresholds (PPTs). Temporal summation of pain after repeated pressure stimulations was assessed by computer-controlled pressure algometry. The pain distribution following painful pressure stimulation was also recorded. Compared with baseline and isotonic saline, the NGF injections caused (P<0.05): (1) progressively increasing soreness scores from 3 hours after the first injection until day 2, after which it remained increased; (2) decreased PPTs at days 1 to 3; (3) facilitated temporal summation of pressure pain at days 1 to 10; and (4) enlarged pressure-induced pain area after the injection on day 1 to day 6. The daily injections of NGF produced a progressive manifestation of muscle soreness, mechanical hyperalgesia, temporal summation of pressure pain, and pressure-induced pain distribution. These data illustrate that the prolonged NGF application affects peripheral and central mechanisms and may reflect process in musculoskeletal pain conditions.
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Similarities between exercise-induced hypoalgesia and conditioned pain modulation in humans.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2013
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Pain inhibitory mechanisms are often assessed by paradigms of exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). In this study it was hypothesized that the spatial and temporal manifestations of EIH and CPM were comparable. The participants were 80 healthy subjects (40 females), between 18 and 65years of age in this randomized, repeated-measures cross-over trial that involved data collection on 2 different days. CPM was assessed by 2 different cold pressor tests (hand and foot). EIH was assessed by 2 intensities of aerobic bicycling exercises and 2 intensities of isometric muscle contraction exercises (arm and leg). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded before, during, after, and 15minutes after conditioning/exercise at sites local to and remote from the extremity used for cold pressor stimulation and exercise. PPTs increased at local as well as at remote sites during both cold pressor tests and after all of the exercise conditions except low-intensity bicycling. EIH after bicycling was higher in women than in men. CPM and the EIH responses after isometric exercises were comparable in men and women and were not affected by age. The EIH response was larger in the exercising body part compared with nonexercising body parts for all exercise conditions. High-intensity exercise produced greater EIH responses than did low-intensity exercise. The change in PPTs during cold pressor tests and the change in PPTs after exercises were not correlated. The CPM response was not dominated by local manifestations, and the effect was seen only during the stimulation, whereas exercise had larger local manifestations, and the effects were also found after exercise.
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The relationship between tumor blood flow, angiogenesis, tumor hypoxia, and aerobic glycolysis.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2013
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Antiangiogenic therapies are being pursued as a means of starving tumors of their energy supply. Although numerous studies show that such therapies render tumors hypoxic, just as many studies have, surprisingly, shown improved tumor oxygenation. These contradicting findings challenge both the original rationale for antiangiogenic therapy and our understanding of the physiology of tissue oxygenation. The flow-diffusion equation, which describes the relation between blood flow and the extraction of freely diffusible molecules in tissue, was recently extended to take the heterogeneity of capillary transit times (CTH) into account. CTH is likely to be high in the chaotic microvasculature of a tumor, increasing the effective shunting of blood through its capillary bed. We review the properties of the extended flow-diffusion equation in tumor tissue. Elevated CTH reduces the extraction of oxygen, glucose, and cytotoxic molecules. The extent to which their net extraction is improved by antiangiogenic therapy, in turn, depends on the extent to which CTH is normalized by the treatment. The extraction of oxygen and glucose are affected to different extents by elevated CTH, and the degree of aerobic glycolysis-known as the Warburg effect-is thus predicted to represent an adaptation to the CTH of the local microvasculature.
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Methods to stabilize and destabilize ammonium borohydride.
Dalton Trans
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2013
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Ammonium borohydride, NH(4)BH(4), has a high hydrogen content of ?(m) = 24.5 wt% H(2) and releases 18 wt% H(2) below T = 160 °C. However, the half-life of bulk NH(4)BH(4) at ambient temperatures and pressures, ~6 h, is insufficient for practical applications. The decomposition of NH(4)BH(4) (ABH(2)) was studied at variable hydrogen and argon back pressures to investigate possible pressure mediated stabilization effects. The hydrogen release rate from solid ABH(2) at ambient temperatures is reduced by ~16% upon increasing the hydrogen back pressure from 5 to 54 bar. Similar results were obtained using argon pressure and the observed stabilization may be explained by a positive volume of activation, ca. 73 ± 17 cc mol(-1), in the transition state leading to hydrogen release. Nanoconfinement in mesoporous silica, MCM-41, was investigated as alternative means to stabilize NH(4)BH(4). However, other factors appear to significantly destabilize NH(4)BH(4) and it rapidly decomposes at ambient temperatures into [(NH(3))(2)BH(2)][BH(4)] (DADB) in accordance with the bulk reaction scheme. The hydrogen desorption kinetics from nanoconfined [(NH(3))(2)BH(2)][BH(4)] is moderately enhanced as evidenced by a reduction in the DSC decomposition peak temperature of ?T = -13 °C as compared to the bulk material. Finally, we note a surprising result, storage of DADB at temperature <-30 °C transformed, reversibly, the [(NH(3))(2)BH(2)][BH(4)] into a new low temperature polymorph as revealed by both XRD and solid state MAS (11)B MAS NMR.
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Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa foreign-body biofilm infections through reduction of the cyclic Di-GMP level in the bacteria.
Infect. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2013
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Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria can engage in biofilm-based infections that evade immune responses and develop into chronic conditions. Because conventional antimicrobials cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. It has recently been established that the secondary messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) functions as a positive regulator of biofilm formation in several different bacteria. In the present study we investigated whether manipulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria potentially can be used for biofilm control in vivo. We constructed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in which a reduction in the c-di-GMP level can be achieved via induction of the Escherichia coli YhjH c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Initial experiments showed that induction of yhjH expression led to dispersal of the majority of the bacteria in in vitro-grown P. aeruginosa biofilms. Subsequently, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa biofilms growing on silicone implants, located in the peritoneal cavity of mice, dispersed after induction of the YhjH protein. Bacteria accumulated temporarily in the spleen after induction of biofilm dispersal, but the mice tolerated the dispersed bacteria well. The present work provides proof of the concept that modulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria is a viable strategy for biofilm control.
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The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers: A Cross-Sectional Study.
Pain Res Treat
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
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Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1) computer-controlled pressure algometry on the vastus lateralis and deltoid muscles and on the infrapatellar fat pad and 2) computerized cuff pressure algometry applied on the lower leg. Deep-tissue pain sensitivity (intensity and duration) was assessed by hypertonic saline injections into the vastus lateralis, deltoid, and infrapatellar fat pad. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength was assessed isometrically at 60-degree knee flexion using a dynamometer. Associations between pain sensitivity and muscle strength were investigated using multiple regressions including age, gender, and body mass index as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r > 0.72) and with cuff PPT (r > 0.4). Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r > 0.39) and with all PPTs (r < -0.41). Conclusions. Pressure pain thresholds at the vastus lateralis are positively associated with knee extensor muscle strength. Different pain sensitivity assessment methods are generally correlated. The cuff PPT and evoked infrapatellar pain seem to reflect the general pain sensitivity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351558.
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Experimental knee pain evoke spreading hyperalgesia and facilitated temporal summation of pain.
Pain Med
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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This study evaluated the deep-tissue pressure pain sensitivity and temporal summation of pain within and around healthy knees exposed to experimental pain.
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Spatial reorganisation of muscle activity correlates with change in tangential force variability during isometric contractions.
J Electromyogr Kinesiol
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2013
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The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of spatial reorganisation of muscle activity on task-related and tangential components of force variability during sustained contractions. Three-dimensional forces were measured from isometric elbow flexion during submaximal contractions (50s, 5-50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)) and total excursion of the centre of pressure was extracted. Spatial electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the biceps brachii muscle. The centroids of the root mean square (RMS) EMG and normalised mutual information (NMI) maps were computed to assess spatial muscle activity and spatial relationship between EMG and task-related force variability, respectively. Result showed that difference between the position of the centroids at the beginning and at the end of the contraction of the RMS EMG and the NMI maps were different in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05), reflecting that muscle regions modulate their activity without necessarily modulating the contribution to the task-related force variability over time. Moreover, this difference between shifts of the centroids was positively correlated with the total excursion of the centre of pressure at the higher levels of contractions (>30% MVC, R(2)>0.30, P<0.05), suggesting that changes in spatial muscle activity could impact on the modulation of tangential forces. Therefore, within-muscle adaptations do not necessarily increase force variability, and this interaction can be quantified by analysing the RMS EMG and the NMI map centroids.
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Tandem ring-closing metathesis/isomerization reactions for the total synthesis of violacein.
Org. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2013
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A series of 5-substituted 2-pyrrolidinones was synthesized through a one-pot ruthenium alkylidene-catalyzed tandem RCM/isomerization/nucleophilic addition sequence. The intermediates resulting from RCM/isomerization showed reactivity toward electrophiles in aldol condensation reactions which provided a new entry for the total synthesis of the antileukemic natural product violacein.
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Muscular heat and mechanical pain sensitivity after lengthening contractions in humans and animals.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2013
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Mechanical sensitivity of muscle nociceptors was previously shown to increase 2 days after lengthening contractions (LC), but heat sensitivity was not different despite nerve growth factor (NGF) being upregulated in the muscle during delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The discrepancy of these results and lack of other reports drove us to assess heat sensitivity during DOMS in humans and to evaluate the effect of NGF on the heat response of muscle C-fibers. Pressure pain thresholds and pain intensity scores to intramuscular injection of isotonic saline at 48°C and capsaicin were recorded in humans after inducing DOMS. The response of single unmyelinated afferents to mechanical and heat stimulations applied to their receptive field was recorded from muscle-nerve preparations in vitro. In humans, pressure pain thresholds were reduced but heat and capsaicin pain responses were not increased during DOMS. In rats, the mechanical but not the heat sensitivity of muscle C-fibers was increased in the LC group. NGF applied to the receptive field facilitated the heat sensitivity relative to the control. The absence of facilitated heat sensitivity after LC, despite the NGF sensitization, may be explained if the NGF concentration produced after LC is not sufficient to sensitize nociceptor response to heat.
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Discovery of a novel selective PPAR? ligand with partial agonist binding properties by integrated in silico/in vitro work flow.
J Chem Inf Model
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Full agonists to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)?, such as Rosiglitazone, have been associated with a series of undesired side effects, such as weight gain, fluid retention, cardiac hypertrophy, and hepatotoxicity. Nevertheless, PPAR? is involved in the expression of genes that control glucose and lipid metabolism and is an important target for drugs against type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. In an effort to identify novel PPAR? ligands with an improved pharmacological profile, emphasis has shifted to selective ligands with partial agonist binding properties. Toward this end we applied an integrated in silico/in vitro workflow, based on pharmacophore- and structure-based virtual screening of the ZINC library, coupled with competitive binding and transactivation assays, and adipocyte differentiation and gene expression studies. Hit compound 9 was identified as the most potent ligand (IC50 = 0.3 ?M) and a relatively poor inducer of adipocyte differentiation. The binding mode of compound 9 was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation, and the calculated free energy of binding was -8.4 kcal/mol. A novel functional group, the carbonitrile group, was identified to be a key substituent in the ligand-protein interactions. Further studies on the transcriptional regulation properties of compound 9 revealed a gene regulatory profile that was to a large extent unique, however functionally closer to that of a partial agonist.
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A novel approach to pharmaco-EEG for investigating analgesics: assessment of spectral indices in single-sweep evoked brain potentials.
Br J Clin Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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To compare results from analysis of averaged and single-sweep evoked brain potentials (EPs) by visual inspection and spectral analysis in order to identify an objective measure for the analgesic effect of buprenorphine and fentanyl.
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Extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
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Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which are thought to be a source of extracellular DNA at sites of infections, increases the tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms toward aminoglycosides. Although biofilm-associated aminoglycoside tolerance recently has been linked to extracellular DNA-mediated activation of the pmr genes, we demonstrate that the aminoglycoside tolerance mediated by the presence of extracellular DNA is not caused by activation of the pmr genes in our P. aeruginosa biofilms but rather by a protective shield effect of the extracellular DNA.
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MR-guided focused ultrasound for the novel and innovative management of osteoarthritic knee pain.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Severe knee pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and troublesome symptoms in the elderly. Recently, local bone denervation by MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has been demonstrated as a promising tool for pain palliation of bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel treatment for knee OA using MRgFUS, and to validate its safety and efficacy.
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Widespread sensitization in patients with chronic pain after revision total knee arthroplasty.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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Pain and sensitization are major issues in patients with osteoarthritis both before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and revision TKA (re-TKA). The aim of this study was to assess sensitization in patients with and without chronic pain after re-TKAs. Twenty patients with chronic knee pain and 20 patients without pain after re-TKA participated. Spreading of pain was evaluated as the number of pain sites using a region-divided body chart. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) and pressure pain tolerance (PTT) were assessed by cuff algometry at the lower leg. Temporal summation of pain was assessed by recordings of the pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS) during repeated cuff pressure stimulations. Conditioning pain modulation (CPM) was recorded by experimental tonic arm pain by cuff pressure stimulation and assessment of PPTs on the knee, leg, and forearm using handheld pressure algometry. Participants with pain after re-TKA compared to participants without pain demonstrated: (1) significantly more pain sites (P=.004), (2) decreased cuff PPTs and PTTs at the lower leg (P<.001), (3) facilitated temporal summation (P<.001), and (4) impaired CPM (P<.001). Additionally, significant correlations between knee pain intensity and cuff PPTs, temporal summation, and CPM and between total duration of knee pain and temporal summation were found (P<.05). This study demonstrated widespread sensitization in patients with pain after re-TKA and highlighted the importance of ongoing nociceptive input for the chronification process. This has important implications for future revisions, and precautions should be taken if patients have widespread sensitization.
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Reorganised anticipatory postural adjustments due to experimental lower extremity muscle pain.
Hum Mov Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2013
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Automated movements adjusting postural control may be hampered during musculoskeletal pain leaving a risk of incomplete control of balance. This study investigated the effect of experimental muscle pain on anticipatory postural adjustments by reaction task movements. While standing, nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (shoulder flexion of dominant side and bilateral heel lift) before, during and after experimental muscle pain. On two different days experimental pain was induced in the m. vastus medialis (VM) or the m. tibialis anterior (TA) of the dominant side by injections of hypertonic saline (1ml, 5.8%). Isotonic saline (1ml, 0.9%) was used as control injection. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 muscles. EMG onset, EMG amplitude, and kinematic parameters (shoulder and ankle joint) were extracted. During shoulder flexion and VM pain the onset of the ipsilateral biceps femoris was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions. During heels lift in the VM and TA pain conditions the onset of the contralateral TA was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions in bilateral side. VM pain significantly reduced m. quadriceps femoris activity and TA pain significantly reduced ipsilateral VM activity and TA activity during bilateral heel lift. The EMG reaction time was delayed in bilateral soleus muscles during heels lift with VM and TA pain. The faster onset of postural muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments may suggest a compensatory function to maintain postural control whereas the reduced postural muscle activity during APAs may indicate a pain adaptation strategy to avoid secondary damage.
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The UVB cutaneous inflammatory pain model: a reproducibility study in healthy volunteers.
Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The human ultraviolet-B (UVB) experimental pain model induces cutaneous neurogenic inflammation, involves hyperalgesia, and is widely used as a pharmacological screening pain model.
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The effect of topical capsaicin-induced sensitization on heat-evoked cutaneous vasomotor responses.
Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Brief, localized, cutaneous, non-painful thermal stimuli can evoke a transient vasomotor response, causing increased cutaneous blood flow and elevated skin temperature. The aims of this study were to investigate 1) if cutaneous sensitization by topical application of capsaicin (TRPV1 receptor agonist) can facilitate the size, duration and spatial extent of this vasomotor response and 2) if males and females respond differently. Thermal pulses (43°C for 60 seconds) were applied on left/right volar forearms of 15 age-matched males and females. Skin temperature and cutaneous blood flow were measured 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after heat application before and after topical capsaicin (1%, 30 min application) with contralateral arm serving as the control. Recordings were made from the region of interest at distances of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm from the capsaicin application site. Sensitization significantly enhanced skin temperature for up to 30 min and compared with non-sensitized skin at 10 min. Females showed the strongest response after sensitization, but the response lasted longer and spread more widely in males. The blood flow responses were significantly longer after capsaicin (from 5 to 30 minutes after thermal application). This increased blood flow extended outside the treated area up to 10 min after stimulation. After sensitization, the area under the blood flow response curves showed significantly stronger responses in females, spreading 4 cm outside the stimulation site. Cutaneous sensitizing caused prolonged and spatially expanded vasomotor responses to standardized thermal stimulation with sex specific differences.
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Altered visual and feet proprioceptive feedbacks during quiet standing increase postural sway in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The objective was to investigate how postural control in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients, with different structural severities and pain levels, is reorganized under different sensory conditions.
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Translational musculoskeletal pain research.
Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2011
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Diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal pain is a major clinical challenge. Fundamental knowledge of nociception from deep somatic structures and related mechanisms of sensitisation have been characterised in animals but the translation into clinical sciences is still lacking. Development and refinement of mechanism-based quantitative sensory testing in healthy volunteers and pain patients have provided new opportunities to assess pain and hyperalgesic reactions. The current technologies can provide information about, for example, peripheral and central sensitisation, descending pain control, central integration and structure specific sensitisation. Such a mechanistic approach can be used for differentiated diagnosis and for target validating new and existing analgesics. Mechanistic pain assessment of new compounds under development provides opportunities for target validation in proof-of-concept studies, which generate information to be used for selecting the most optimal patients for later clinical trials. New safe and efficient compounds are highly needed in the area of musculoskeletal pain management.
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A formal mathematical framework for physiological observations, experiments and analyses.
J R Soc Interface
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2011
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Experiments can be complex and produce large volumes of heterogeneous data, which make their execution, analysis, independent replication and meta-analysis difficult. We propose a mathematical model for experimentation and analysis in physiology that addresses these problems. We show that experiments can be composed from time-dependent quantities, and be expressed as purely mathematical equations. Our structure for representing physiological observations can carry information of any type and therefore provides a precise ontology for a wide range of observations. Our framework is concise, allowing entire experiments to be defined unambiguously in a few equations. In order to demonstrate that our approach can be implemented, we show the equations that we have used to run and analyse two non-trivial experiments describing visually stimulated neuronal responses and dynamic clamp of vertebrate neurons. Our ideas could provide a theoretical basis for developing new standards of data acquisition, analysis and communication in neurophysiology.
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Solid-phase synthesis of smac peptidomimetics incorporating triazoloprolines and biarylalanines.
ACS Comb Sci
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2011
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Apoptotic induction mechanisms are of crucial importance for the general homeostasis of multicellular organisms. In cancer the apoptotic pathways are downregulated, which, at least partly, is due to an abundance of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) that block the apoptotic cascade by deactivating proteolytic caspases. The Smac protein has an antagonistic effect on IAPs, thus providing structural clues for the synthesis of new pro-apoptotic compounds. Herein, we report a solid-phase approach for the synthesis of Smac-derived tetrapeptide libraries. On the basis of a common (N-Me)AVPF sequence, peptides incorporating triazoloprolines and biarylalanines were synthesized by means of Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition and Pd-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reactions. Solid-phase procedures were optimized to high efficiency, thus accessing all products in excellent crude purities and yields (both typically above 90%). The peptides were subjected to biological evaluation in a live/dead cellular assay which revealed that structural decorations on the AVPF sequence indeed are highly important for cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells.
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Fascicle-selectivity of an intraneural stimulation electrode in the rabbit sciatic nerve.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2011
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The current literature contains extensive research on peripheral nerve interfaces, including both extraneural and intrafascicular electrodes. Interfascicular electrodes, which are in-between these two with respect to nerve fiber proximity have, however, received little interest. In this proof-of-concept study, an interfascicular electrode was designed to be implanted in the sciatic nerve and activate the tibial and peroneal nerves selectively of each other, and it was tested in acute experiments on nine anaesthetized rabbits. The electrode was inserted without difficulty between the fascicles using blunt glass tools, which could easily penetrate the epineurium but not the perineurium. Selective activation of all tibial and peroneal nerves in the nine animals was achieved with high selectivity (? = 0.98 ± 0.02). Interfascicular electrodes could provide an interesting addition to the bulk of peripheral nerve interfaces available for neural prosthetic devices. Since interfascicular electrodes can be inserted without fully freeing the nerve and have the advantage of not confining the nerve to a limited space, they could, e.g., be an alternative to extraneural electrodes in locations where such surgery is complicated due to blood vessels or fatty tissue. Further studies are, however, necessary to develop biocompatible electrodes and test their stability and safety in chronic experiments.
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Vascular effects of plinabulin (NPI-2358) and the influence on tumour response when given alone or combined with radiation.
Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2011
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This study investigated the anti-tumour effects of the novel vascular disrupting agent plinabulin (NPI-2358) when given alone or combined with radiation.
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Basic aspects of musculoskeletal pain: from acute to chronic pain.
J Man Manip Ther
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2011
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The transition from acute to chronic musculoskeletal pain is not well understood. To understand this transition, it is important to know how peripheral and central sensitization are manifested and how they can be assessed. A variety of human pain biomarkers have been developed to quantify localized and widespread musculoskeletal pain. In addition, human surrogate models may be used to induce sensitization in otherwise healthy volunteers. Pain can arise from different musculoskeletal structures (e.g. muscles, joints, ligaments, or tendons), and differentiating the origin of pain from those different structures is a challenge. Tissue specific pain biomarkers can be used to tease these different aspects. Chronic musculoskeletal pain patients in general show signs of local/central sensitization and spread of pain to degrees which correlate to pain intensity and duration. From a management perspective, it is therefore highly important to reduce pain intensity and try to minimize the duration of pain.
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Experimental knee pain impairs postural stability during quiet stance but not after perturbations.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2011
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The objective of this study was to examine the effect of experimental knee-related pain on postural control. Twelve healthy subjects stood as quietly as possible on a movable force platform (that measured the centre of pressure and provided fast perturbations) before, during, and after experimental knee-related pain. Lower limb electromyographic (EMG) activity and joint angles were measured. Experimental pain was induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad (unilateral and bilateral) and isotonic saline was used for control sessions. Compared with the baseline and control sessions, unilateral and bilateral knee-related pain during quiet standing evoked (1) an increased sway displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (P < 0.05), (2) larger knee flexion (P < 0.05), and (3) larger EMG changes. Bilateral pain also induced (1) larger medial-lateral sway displacement and speed (P < 0.05) and (2) larger left hip flexion (P < 0.05). During forward perturbations, subjects leaned forward during both painful conditions when compared with baseline (P < 0.05). The additional impairment by bilateral pain suggests that the non-painful limb in unilateral pain conditions compensates for the impaired postural control. These results show that knee-related pain impairs postural stability during quiet standing, indicating the vulnerability of patients with knee pain to falls. This measure could potentially help clinicians who seek to assess how pain responses may contribute to patients postural control and stability during quiet standing.
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Latent myofascial trigger points are associated with an increased antagonistic muscle activity during agonist muscle contraction.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2011
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The aim of this study was to evaluate motor unit activity from a latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) in an antagonist muscle during isometric agonist muscle contraction. Intramuscular activity was recorded with an intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) needle inserted into a latent MTP or a non-MTP in the posterior deltoid muscle at rest and during isometric shoulder flexion performed at 25% of maximum voluntary contraction in 14 healthy subjects. Surface EMGs were recorded from the anterior and posterior deltoid muscles. Maximal pain intensity and referred pain induced by EMG needle insertion were recorded on a visual analogue scale. The results showed that higher local pain was observed following needle insertion into latent MTPs (4.64 ± .48 cm) than non-MTPs (2.35 ± .43 cm, P < .005). Referred pain was reported in 6/14 subjects following needle insertion into latent MTPs, but none into the non-MTPs. The intramuscular EMG activity, but not surface EMG activity, in the antagonist muscle was significantly higher at rest and during shoulder flexion at latent MTPs than non-MTPs (P < .05). The current study provides the first evidence that increased motor unit excitability is associated with reduced antagonist reciprocal inhibition.
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Local pain and spreading hyperalgesia induced by intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor are not reduced by local anesthesia of the muscle.
Clin J Pain
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2011
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Injections with local anesthesia for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes are common clinical practice. This double-blind placebo controlled study explores the rational of local anesthetic blocks for the detection of muscle pain as the primary generator in spreading hyperalgesic conditions.
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Fasting, but not exercise, increases adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) protein and reduces G(0)/G(1) switch gene 2 (G0S2) protein and mRNA content in human adipose tissue.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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Fasting and exercise are characterized by increased lipolysis, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood.
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Improved hydrogen storage kinetics of nanoconfined NaAlH? catalyzed with TiCl? nanoparticles.
ACS Nano
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
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Nanoparticles of NaAlH(4) have been infiltrated in nanoporous carbon aerogel with TiCl(3) nanoparticles in order to explore possible synergetic effects between nanoconfinement and a functionalized catalytic scaffold. Resorcinol formaldehyde carbon aerogels with an average pore size of 17 nm and total pore volume of 1.26 mL/g were infiltrated with TiCl(3) to obtain an aerogel doped with 3.0 wt % TiCl(3) nanoparticles. NaAlH(4) was melt-infiltrated into the functionalized carbon aerogel at 189 °C and p(H(2)) ? 186-199 bar. Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) combined with focused ion beam (FIB) techniques revealed the presence of Na, Al, Ti, and Cl inside the aerogel scaffold material. The infiltrated NaAlH(4) was X-ray amorphous, whereas (27)Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of nanoconfined NaAlH(4). Temperature-programmed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS) and Sieverts measurements demonstrated significantly improved hydrogen desorption kinetics for this new nanoconfined NaAlH(4)-TiCl(3) material as compared to nanoconfined NaAlH(4) without the catalysts TiCl(3) and to bulk ball-milled samples of NaAlH(4)-TiCl(3). We find that the onset temperature for hydrogen release was close to room temperature (T(onset) = 33 °C), and the hydrogen release rate reached a maximum value at 125 °C, which demonstrates favorable synergetic effects between nanoconfinement and catalyst addition.
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Ultrasound guidance improves a continuous popliteal sciatic nerve block when compared with nerve stimulation.
Reg Anesth Pain Med
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Continuous sciatic nerve blockade at the popliteal level effectively alleviates postoperative pain after major foot and ankle surgery. No randomized controlled trials have previously compared the success rate of continuous sciatic nerve sensory blockade between ultrasound and nerve stimulation guidance. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that ultrasound-guided catheter placement improves the success rate of continuous sciatic nerve sensory blockade compared with catheter placement with nerve stimulation guidance.
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Transverse versus longitudinal tripolar configuration for selective stimulation with multipolar cuff electrodes.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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The ability to stimulate subareas of a nerve selectively is highly desirable, since it has the potential of simplifying surgery to implanting one cuff on a large nerve instead of many cuffs on smaller nerves or muscles, or alternatively can improve function where surgical access to the smaller nerves is limited. In this paper, stimulation was performed with a four-channel multipolar cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve of nine rabbits to compare the extensively researched longitudinal tripolar configuration with the transverse tripolar configuration, which has received less interest. The performance of these configurations was evaluated in terms of selectivity in recruitment of the three branches of the sciatic nerve. The results showed that the transverse configuration was able to selectively activate the sciatic nerve branches to a functionally relevant level in more cases than the longitudinal configuration (20/27 versus 11/27 branches) and overall achieved a higher mean selectivity [0.79 ± 0.13 versus 0.61 ± 0.09 (mean ± standard deviation)]. The transverse configuration was most successful at recruiting the small cutaneous and medium-sized peroneal branches, and less successful at recruiting the large tibial nerve.
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Reproduction of overall spontaneous pain pattern by manual stimulation of active myofascial trigger points in fibromyalgia patients.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2011
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It has previously been reported that local and referred pain from active myofascial trigger points (MTPs) in the neck and shoulder region contribute to fibromyalgia (FM) pain and that the pain pattern induced from active MTPs can reproduce parts of the spontaneous clinical FM pain pattern. The current study investigated whether the overall spontaneous FM pain pattern can be reproduced by local and referred pain from active MTPs located in different muscles.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.