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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Plasma Phospholipid PUFAs Are Associated with Greater Muscle and Knee Extension Strength but Not with Changes in Muscle Parameters in Older Adults.
J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2014
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Muscle mass, intermuscular adipose tissue, and strength are important indicators of physical function. Dietary fatty acids (FAs) have been associated with muscle parameters such as larger size and higher strength, but large, population-based longitudinal data in older adults who are at risk of functional decline are lacking.
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Mediation Analysis of Aortic Stiffness and Renal Microvascular Function.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2014
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Aortic stiffening, assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, is associated with CKD. Transmission of excessive flow pulsatility into the low-impedance renal microvasculature may mediate this association. However, direct analyses of macrovascular-microvascular relations in the kidney are limited. Using arterial tonometry, iohexol clearance, and magnetic resonance imaging, we related arterial stiffness, GFR, urinary albumin excretion, and potential mediators, including renal artery pulsatility index, renal vascular resistance, and arterial volume in the cortex, in 367 older adults (ages 72-92 years) participating in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. In a model adjusted for age, sex, heart rate, and body size, aortic stiffness was related to GFR (Slope of regression B=-2.28±0.85 ml/min per SD, P=0.008) but not urine albumin (P=0.09). After accounting for pulsatility index, the relation between aortic stiffness and GFR was no longer significant (P=0.10). Mediation analysis showed that 34% of the relation between aortic stiffness and GFR was mediated by pulsatility index (95% confidence interval of indirect effect, -1.35 to -0.29). An additional 20% or 36% of the relation was mediated by lower arterial volume in the cortex or higher renal vascular resistance, respectively, when offered as mediators downstream from higher pulsatility index (95% confidence interval of indirect effect including arterial volume in the cortex, -2.22 to -0.40; 95% confidence interval of indirect effect including renal vascular resistance, -2.51 to -0.76). These analyses provide the first evidence that aortic stiffness may contribute to lower GFR by transferring excessive flow pulsatility into the susceptible renal microvasculature, leading to dynamic constriction or vessel loss.
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The prevalence of aortic stenosis in the elderly in Iceland and predictions for the coming decades: The AGES-Reykjavík study.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
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To evaluate the prevalence of significant aortic valve stenosis (AS) in a randomly selected study population of elderly individuals representing the general population of Iceland. Furthermore, to predict the number of individuals likely to have severe AS in the future.
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Urinary Melatonin Levels, Sleep Disruption, and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Elderly Men.
Eur. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2014
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Melatonin has anticarcinogenic properties in experimental models. We undertook a case-cohort study of 928 Icelandic men without prostate cancer (PCa) nested within the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik cohort to investigate the prospective association between first morning-void urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) levels and the subsequent risk for PCa, under the hypothesis that men with lower aMT6s levels have an increased risk for advanced PCa. We used weighted Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between first morning-void aMT6s levels and PCa risk, adjusting for potential confounders. A total of 111 men were diagnosed with incident PCa, including 24 with advanced disease. Men who reported sleep problems at baseline had lower morning aMT6s levels compared with those who reported no sleep problems. Men with morning aMT6s levels below the median had a fourfold statistically significant increased risk for advanced disease compared with men with levels above the median (hazard ratio: 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-12.98). These results require replication in larger prospective studies with longer follow-up.
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A blunted diurnal cortisol response in the lower educated does not explain educational differences in coronary heart disease: Findings from the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Soc Sci Med
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
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Lower educational attainment generally is a strong predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanisms of this effect are, however, less clear. One hypothesis is that stress related to limitations imposed by lower socioeconomic status elicits changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, which, in turn, increases risk of CHD. In a large cohort study, we examined whether educational attainment was related to risk of fatal and non-fatal CHD and the extent to which salivary cortisol mediated this relation independent of potential confounders, including lifestyles. Data came from 3723 participants aged 66 through 96 from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES) - Reykjavik Study. Between 2002 and 2006, data were collected using questionnaires and examinations including morning and evening salivary samples. Hospital admission records and cause of death registries (ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes) were available until December 2009. Linear regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed. Even after adjustment for potential confounders, including lifestyle, persons with lower educational attainment showed a blunted cortisol response and also greater risk of incident CHD. However, our data did not support the role of cortisol as a mediator in the association between education and CHD in an older sample (192).
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Pulse pressure relation to aortic and left ventricular structure in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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High pulse pressure, a major cardiovascular risk factor, has been attributed to medial elastic fiber degeneration and aortic dilation, which transfers hemodynamic load to stiffer collagen. However, recent studies suggest higher pulse pressure is instead associated with smaller aortic diameter. Thus, we sought to elucidate relations of pulse pressure with aortic stiffness and aortic and cardiac dimensions. We used magnetic resonance imaging to examine relationships of pulse pressure with lumen area and wall stiffness and thickness in the thoracic aorta and left ventricular structure in 526 participants (72-94 years of age, 295 women) in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. In a multivariable model that adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and standard vascular risk factors, central pulse pressure had a negative relationship with aortic lumen area (all effects expressed as mm Hg/SD; B=-8.1±1.2; P<0.001) and positive relationships with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (B=3.8±1.0; P<0.001), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (B=3.6±1.0; P<0.001), and aortic wall area (B=3.0±1.2; P=0.015). Higher pulse pressure in older people is associated with smaller aortic lumen area and greater aortic wall stiffness and thickness and left ventricular volume. Relationships of larger ventricular volume and smaller aortic lumen with higher pulse pressure suggest mismatch in hemodynamic load accommodation by the heart and aorta in older people.
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The Alcohol Paradox: Light-to-Moderate Alcohol Consumption, Cognitive Function, and Brain Volume.
J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2014
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Studies of older persons show consumption of light-to-moderate amounts of alcohol is positively associated with cognitive function and, separately, is negatively associated with total brain volume (TBV). This is paradoxical as generally, cognitive function is positively associated with TBV. We examined the relationships of TBV, global cognitive function (GCF), and alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort of 3,363 men and women (b. 1907-1935) participating in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006) and who were free of dementia or mild cognitive impairment
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Joint effect of mid- and late-life blood pressure on the brain: the AGES-Reykjavik study.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2014
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We hypothesized that in participants with a history of hypertension, lower late-life blood pressure (BP) will be associated with more brain pathology.
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Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.
Daan W Loth, María Soler Artigas, Sina A Gharib, Louise V Wain, Nora Franceschini, Beate Koch, Tess D Pottinger, Albert Vernon Smith, Qing Duan, Chris Oldmeadow, Mi Kyeong Lee, David P Strachan, Alan L James, Jennifer E Huffman, Veronique Vitart, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Nicholas J Wareham, Jaakko Kaprio, Xin-Qun Wang, Holly Trochet, Mika Kähönen, Claudia Flexeder, Eva Albrecht, Lorna M Lopez, Kim de Jong, Bharat Thyagarajan, Alexessander Couto Alves, Stefan Enroth, Ernst Omenaas, Peter K Joshi, Tove Fall, Ana Viñuela, Lenore J Launer, Laura R Loehr, Myriam Fornage, Guo Li, Jemma B Wilk, Wenbo Tang, Ani Manichaikul, Lies Lahousse, Tamara B Harris, Kari E North, Alicja R Rudnicka, Jennie Hui, Xiangjun Gu, Thomas Lumley, Alan F Wright, Nicholas D Hastie, Susan Campbell, Rajesh Kumar, Isabelle Pin, Robert A Scott, Kirsi H Pietiläinen, Ida Surakka, Yongmei Liu, Elizabeth G Holliday, Holger Schulz, Joachim Heinrich, Gail Davies, Judith M Vonk, Mary Wojczynski, Anneli Pouta, Asa Johansson, Sarah H Wild, Erik Ingelsson, Fernando Rivadeneira, Henry Völzke, Pirro G Hysi, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Alanna C Morrison, Jerome I Rotter, Wei Gao, Dirkje S Postma, Wendy B White, Stephen S Rich, Albert Hofman, Thor Aspelund, David Couper, Lewis J Smith, Bruce M Psaty, Kurt Lohman, Esteban G Burchard, André G Uitterlinden, Melissa Garcia, Bonnie R Joubert, Wendy L McArdle, A Bill Musk, Nadia Hansel, Susan R Heckbert, Lina Zgaga, Joyce B J van Meurs, Pau Navarro, Igor Rudan, Yeon-Mok Oh, Susan Redline, Deborah L Jarvis, Jing Hua Zhao, Taina Rantanen, George T O'Connor, Samuli Ripatti, Rodney J Scott, Stefan Karrasch, Harald Grallert, Nathan C Gaddis, John M Starr, Cisca Wijmenga, Ryan L Minster, David J Lederer, Juha Pekkanen, Ulf Gyllensten, Harry Campbell, Andrew P Morris, Sven Gläser, Christopher J Hammond, Kristin M Burkart, John Beilby, Stephen B Kritchevsky, Vilmundur Gudnason, Dana B Hancock, O Dale Williams, Ozren Polašek, Tatijana Zemunik, Ivana Kolčić, Marcy F Petrini, Matthias Wjst, Woo Jin Kim, David J Porteous, Generation Scotland, Blair H Smith, Anne Viljanen, Markku Heliövaara, John R Attia, Ian Sayers, Regina Hampel, Christian Gieger, Ian J Deary, H Marike Boezen, Anne Newman, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, James F Wilson, Lars Lind, Bruno H Stricker, Alexander Teumer, Timothy D Spector, Erik Melén, Marjolein J Peters, Leslie A Lange, R Graham Barr, Ken R Bracke, Fien M Verhamme, Joohon Sung, Pieter S Hiemstra, Patricia A Cassano, Akshay Sood, Caroline Hayward, Josée Dupuis, Ian P Hall, Guy G Brusselle, Martin D Tobin, Stephanie J London.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.
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Validation of a model to estimate personalised screening frequency to monitor diabetic retinopathy.
Diabetologia
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2014
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Our study aimed to validate a model to determine a personalised screening frequency for diabetic retinopathy.
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Segmental Kidney Volumes Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Their Association With CKD in Older People.
Am. J. Kidney Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a potentially powerful tool for analysis of kidney structure and function. The ability to measure functional and hypofunctional tissues could provide important information in groups at risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD), such as the elderly.
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Community awareness of stroke in Accra, Ghana.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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Community awareness of stroke, especially the risk factors and warning signs is important in the control of the disease. In sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about community awareness of stroke though the brunt of stroke is currently borne in this region. The aim of the study was to evaluate stroke awareness in Accra (capital city of Ghana) particularly, the risk factors and warning signs.
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Risk factors and health during pregnancy among women previously exposed to sexual violence.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2014
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To determine whether women exposed to sexual violence in adolescence or adulthood are at increased risk of adverse maternal characteristics during subsequent pregnancies.
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Spousal loss and cognitive function in later life: a 25-year follow-up in the AGES-Reykjavik study.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2014
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The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between loss of a life partner and the development of dementia and decline in cognitive function in later life. We used an Icelandic cohort of 4,370 participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study who were living as married in 1978 (born in 1907-1935) and were either still married (unexposed cohort) or widowed (exposed cohort) at follow-up (in 2002-2006). We ascertained history of marital status and spouse's death by record linkage to the Registry of the Total Population, Statistics Iceland. The outcome measures were as follows: 1) dementia and mild cognitive impairment; and 2) memory, speed of processing, and executive function. During the observation period, 3,007 individuals remained married and 1,363 lost a spouse through death. We did not find any significant associations between loss of a spouse and our outcome variables, except that widowed women had poorer executive function (mean = -0.08) during the first 2 years after their husbands' deaths compared with still-married women (mean = 0.09). Our findings do not support the notion that the risk of dementia is increased following the loss of a spouse, yet women demonstrate a seemingly temporary decline in executive function following the death of a partner.
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Quality Pain Management in the Hospital Setting from the Patient's Perspective.
Pain Pract
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2014
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Pain management is a crucial issue for patients, and patients' perception of care is an important quality outcome criterion for health care institutions. Pain remains a common problem in hospitals, with subsequent deleterious effects on well-being.
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Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium.
Alireza Moayyeri, Yi-Hsiang Hsu, David Karasik, Karol Estrada, Su-Mei Xiao, Carrie Nielson, Priya Srikanth, Sylvie Giroux, Scott G Wilson, Hou-Feng Zheng, Albert V Smith, Stephen R Pye, Paul J Leo, Alexander Teumer, Joo-Yeon Hwang, Claes Ohlsson, Fiona McGuigan, Ryan L Minster, Caroline Hayward, José M Olmos, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Joshua R Lewis, Karin M A Swart, Laura Masi, Chris Oldmeadow, Elizabeth G Holliday, Sulin Cheng, Natasja M van Schoor, Nicholas C Harvey, Marcin Kruk, Fabiola Del Greco M, Wilmar Igl, Olivia Trummer, Efi Grigoriou, Robert Luben, Ching-Ti Liu, Yanhua Zhou, Ling Oei, Carolina Medina-Gomez, Joseph Zmuda, Greg Tranah, Suzanne J Brown, Frances M Williams, Nicole Soranzo, Johanna Jakobsdottir, Kristin Siggeirsdottir, Kate L Holliday, Anke Hannemann, Min Jin Go, Melissa Garcia, Ozren Polašek, Marika Laaksonen, Kun Zhu, Anke W Enneman, Mark McEvoy, Roseanne Peel, Pak Chung Sham, Maciej Jaworski, Asa Johansson, Andrew A Hicks, Pawel Pludowski, Rodney Scott, Rosalie A M Dhonukshe-Rutten, Nathalie van der Velde, Mika Kähönen, Jorma S Viikari, Harri Sievänen, Olli T Raitakari, Jesús González-Macías, José L Hernández, Dan Mellström, Osten Ljunggren, Yoon Shin Cho, Uwe Völker, Matthias Nauck, Georg Homuth, Henry Völzke, Robin Haring, Matthew A Brown, Eugene McCloskey, Geoffrey C Nicholson, Richard Eastell, John A Eisman, Graeme Jones, Ian R Reid, Elaine M Dennison, John Wark, Steven Boonen, Dirk Vanderschueren, Frederick C W Wu, Thor Aspelund, J Brent Richards, Doug Bauer, Albert Hofman, Kay-Tee Khaw, George Dedoussis, Barbara Obermayer-Pietsch, Ulf Gyllensten, Peter P Pramstaller, Roman S Lorenc, Cyrus Cooper, Annie Wai Chee Kung, Paul Lips, Markku Alen, John Attia, Maria Luisa Brandi, Lisette C P G M de Groot, Terho Lehtimäki, José A Riancho, Harry Campbell, Yongmei Liu, Tamara B Harris, Kristina Akesson, Magnus Karlsson, Jong-Young Lee, Henri Wallaschofski, Emma L Duncan, Terence W O'Neill, Vilmundur Gudnason, Timothy D Spector, François Rousseau, Eric Orwoll, Steven R Cummings, Nick J Wareham, Fernando Rivadeneira, André G Uitterlinden, Richard L Prince, Douglas P Kiel, Jonathan Reeve, Stephen K Kaptoge.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by X-ray (DXA), may be convenient alternatives for evaluating osteoporosis and fracture risk. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to assess the genetic determinants of heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; n = 14 260), velocity of sound (VOS; n = 15 514) and BMD (n = 4566) in 13 discovery cohorts. Independent replication involved seven cohorts with GWA data (in silico n = 11 452) and new genotyping in 15 cohorts (de novo n = 24 902). In combined random effects, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10(-8)) associations with heel bone properties. Alongside SNPs within or near previously identified osteoporosis susceptibility genes including ESR1 (6q25.1: rs4869739, rs3020331, rs2982552), SPTBN1 (2p16.2: rs11898505), RSPO3 (6q22.33: rs7741021), WNT16 (7q31.31: rs2908007), DKK1 (10q21.1: rs7902708) and GPATCH1 (19q13.11: rs10416265), we identified a new locus on chromosome 11q14.2 (rs597319 close to TMEM135, a gene recently linked to osteoblastogenesis and longevity) significantly associated with both BUA and VOS (P < 8.23 × 10(-14)). In meta-analyses involving 25 cohorts with up to 14 985 fracture cases, six of 10 SNPs associated with heel bone properties at P < 5 × 10(-6) also had the expected direction of association with any fracture (P < 0.05), including three SNPs with P < 0.005: 6q22.33 (rs7741021), 7q31.31 (rs2908007) and 10q21.1 (rs7902708). In conclusion, this GWA study reveals the effect of several genes common to central DXA-derived BMD and heel ultrasound/DXA measures and points to a new genetic locus with potential implications for better understanding of osteoporosis pathophysiology.
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Profile and health-related quality of life of Ghanaian stroke survivors.
Clin Interv Aging
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Stroke is a leading cause of mortality with a major effect on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). There are no previous studies exploring HRQoL among stroke survivors in Ghana, despite the increasing public health significance of the disease in this country. Here we describe the profile of and factors associated with HRQoL among stroke survivors in Ghana.
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Population assessment of future trajectories in coronary heart disease mortality.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s, largely reflecting improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to predict future CHD mortality in Iceland based on potential risk factor trends.
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Early peak height velocity and cardiovascular disease mortality among Icelandic women.
Ann. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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Early pubertal onset among girls has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. We examined whether timing of peak height velocity (PHV), an early marker of maturity, was associated with CVD mortality.
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Common variants in mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.
Afshin Parsa, Christian Fuchsberger, Anna Köttgen, Conall M O'Seaghdha, Cristian Pattaro, Mariza de Andrade, Daniel I Chasman, Alexander Teumer, Karlhans Endlich, Matthias Olden, Ming-Huei Chen, Adrienne Tin, Young J Kim, Daniel Taliun, Man Li, Mary Feitosa, Mathias Gorski, Qiong Yang, Claudia Hundertmark, Meredith C Foster, Nicole Glazer, Aaron Isaacs, Madhumathi Rao, Albert V Smith, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Maksim Struchalin, Toshiko Tanaka, Guo Li, Shih-Jen Hwang, Elizabeth J Atkinson, Kurt Lohman, Marilyn C Cornelis, Asa Johansson, Anke Tönjes, Abbas Dehghan, Vincent Couraki, Elizabeth G Holliday, Rossella Sorice, Zoltan Kutalik, Terho Lehtimäki, Tonu Esko, Harshal Deshmukh, Sheila Ulivi, Audrey Y Chu, Federico Murgia, Stella Trompet, Medea Imboden, Barbara Kollerits, Giorgio Pistis, Tamara B Harris, Lenore J Launer, Thor Aspelund, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Braxton D Mitchell, Eric Boerwinkle, Helena Schmidt, Edith Hofer, Frank Hu, Ayse Demirkan, Ben A Oostra, Stephen T Turner, Jingzhong Ding, Jeanette S Andrews, Barry I Freedman, Franco Giulianini, Wolfgang Koenig, Thomas Illig, Angela Döring, H-Erich Wichmann, Lina Zgaga, Tatijana Zemunik, Mladen Boban, Cosetta Minelli, Heather E Wheeler, Wilmar Igl, Ghazal Zaboli, Sarah H Wild, Alan F Wright, Harry Campbell, David Ellinghaus, Ute Nöthlings, Gunnar Jacobs, Reiner Biffar, Florian Ernst, Georg Homuth, Heyo K Kroemer, Matthias Nauck, Sylvia Stracke, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Peter Kovacs, Michael Stumvoll, Reedik Mägi, Albert Hofman, André G Uitterlinden, Fernando Rivadeneira, Yurii S Aulchenko, Ozren Polašek, Nick Hastie, Veronique Vitart, Catherine Helmer, Jie Jin Wang, Bénédicte Stengel, Daniela Ruggiero, Sven Bergmann, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Tiit Nikopensius, Michael Province, Helen Colhoun, Alex Doney, Antonietta Robino, Bernhard K Krämer, Laura Portas, Ian Ford, Brendan M Buckley, Martin Adam, Gian-Andri Thun, Bernhard Paulweber, Margot Haun, Cinzia Sala, Paul Mitchell, Marina Ciullo, Peter Vollenweider, Olli Raitakari, Andres Metspalu, Colin Palmer, Paolo Gasparini, Mario Pirastu, J Wouter Jukema, Nicole M Probst-Hensch, Florian Kronenberg, Daniela Toniolo, Vilmundur Gudnason, Alan R Shuldiner, Josef Coresh, Reinhold Schmidt, Luigi Ferrucci, Cornelia M van Duijn, Ingrid Borecki, Sharon L R Kardia, Yongmei Liu, Gary C Curhan, Igor Rudan, Ulf Gyllensten, James F Wilson, Andre Franke, Peter P Pramstaller, Rainer Rettig, Inga Prokopenko, Jacqueline Witteman, Caroline Hayward, Paul M Ridker, Murielle Bochud, Iris M Heid, David S Siscovick, Caroline S Fox, W Linda Kao, Carsten A Böger.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2013
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Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.
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[The effects of 6 months multimodal training on functional performance, strength, endurance, and body mass index of older individuals. Are the benefits of training similar among women and men?].
Laeknabladid
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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Good functional performance in elderly people greatly improves their changes of independence and well-being. Conversely, bad functional performance can impair their capability of managing the activities of daily life.. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-months multimodal training intervention on the physical performance of males and females, possible gender differences and the outcome 6 and 12 months after its completion.
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Migraine, depression, and brain volume: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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To examine the joint association of migraine headache and major depressive disorder on brain volume in older persons without dementia.
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The Relationship between Chronic Pain Pattern, Interference with Life and Health-Related Quality of Life in a Nationwide Community Sample.
Pain Manag Nurs
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2013
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To establish the scope of the problem of chronic pain in the population, we need to extend the focus on prevalence, the most frequently studied factor. Among other important factors is the complex relationship between the temporal characteristics of pain and their impact on peoples lives. The purpose of the present study was to describe the characteristics of chronic pain, including pattern, severity, location, spread, and duration, in a population-based sample and to investigate the relationships between pain pattern and impact on the individuals life measured by interference with life and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In this cross-sectional study, a postal questionnaire measuring pain characteristics, life interference (Brief Pain Inventory), and HRQoL (Short Form 36 Health Survey), was sent to a sample of 4,500 individuals, randomly drawn from the Icelandic National Register. The total response rate was 36.9% and was significantly higher among native Icelanders (40.6%) than individuals of non-Icelandic origin (8.6%).The prevalence of chronic pain (?3 months) was 47.5% with mean duration of 9.3 years, and 31.9% reported constant pain. Participants with constant pain reported higher life interference scores and less HRQoL than participants with intermittent or periodic pain. Hierarchical stepwise regression analyses showed that pain pattern and severity accounted for 44.4% variance for life interference. The range of the variances for these variables for the five domains of HRQoL was from 7.3% (mental health) to 53.3% (bodily pain). Pain pattern and severity are the most significant predictors of the impact of chronic pain on individuals daily life.
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Prevalence of airflow obstruction in nonsmoking older individuals using different spirometric criteria: the AGES Reykjavik Study.
COPD
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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The prevalence and characteristics of airway obstruction in older individuals varies widely with the definition used. We used a random sample of never smoking older population in Iceland to compare the prevalence and clinical profile of subjects diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) based on different spirometric criteria.
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Type 3 finger length pattern is associated with total knee replacements due to osteoarthritis but not with hip replacements or hand osteoarthritis in the elderly: the AGES-Reykjavik study.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Recent case-control studies have shown an association between type 3 finger length pattern (longer ring finger than index finger) and knee osteoarthritis. This large cross-sectional study tests the hypothesis that the type 3 pattern is associated with total joint replacements due to osteoarthritis in a large population based study.
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Similarities and differences between sexes in regional loss of cortical and trabecular bone in the mid-femoral neck: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
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The risk of hip fracture rises rapidly with age, and is notably higher in women. After falls and prior fragility fractures, the main clinically recognized risk factor for hip fracture is reduced bone density. To better understand the extent to which femoral neck density and structure change with age in each sex, we carried out a longitudinal study in subjects not treated with agents known to influence bone mineral density (BMD), to investigate changes in regional cortical thickness, as well as cortical and trabecular BMD at the mid-femoral neck. Segmental quantitative computed tomography (QCT) analysis was used to assess bone measurements in two anatomic subregions, the superolateral (superior) and inferomedial (inferior). A total of 400 older individuals (100 men and 300 women, aged 66-90 years) who were participants in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik), were studied. Participants had two QCT scans of the hip over a median follow-up of 5.1 years (mean baseline age 74 years). Changes in bone values during follow-up were estimated from mixed effects regression models. At baseline women had lower bone values in the superior region than men. At follow-up all bone values were lower in women, except cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) inferiorly. The relative losses in all bone values estimated in the superior region were substantially (about threefold) and significantly greater compared to those estimated in the inferior region in both sexes. Women lost cortical thickness and cortical vBMD more rapidly than men in both regions; and this was only weakly reflected in total femoral neck dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-like results. The higher rate of bone loss in women at critical locations may contribute materially to the greater femoral neck fracture incidence among women than men.
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Atrial fibrillation is associated with reduced brain volume and cognitive function independent of cerebral infarcts.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with cognitive decline independent of stroke, suggesting additional effects of AF on the brain. We aimed to assess the association between AF and brain function and structure in a general elderly population.
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Hemostatic factors and risk of coronary heart disease in general populations: new prospective study and updated meta-analyses.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2013
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Activation of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis may be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess associations of circulating tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen, D-dimer and von Willebrand factor (VWF) with coronary heart disease risk.
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Socioeconomic factors from midlife predict mobility limitation and depressed mood three decades later; findings from the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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Taking into account our rapidly ageing population, older people are of particular interest in studying health inequalities. Most studies of older persons only include measures of current socioeconomic status (SES) and do not take into account data from earlier stages of life. In addition, only classic SES measures are used, while alternative measures, such as car ownership and house ownership, might equally well predict health. The present study aims to examine the effect of midlife socioeconomic factors on mobility limitation and depressed mood three decades later.
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Derivation and assessment of risk prediction models using case-cohort data.
BMC Med Res Methodol
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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Case-cohort studies are increasingly used to quantify the association of novel factors with disease risk. Conventional measures of predictive ability need modification for this design. We show how Harrells C-index, Roystons D, and the category-based and continuous versions of the net reclassification index (NRI) can be adapted.
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Pulmonary function impairment may be an early risk factor for late-life cognitive impairment.
J Am Geriatr Soc
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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To determine the association between change in pulmonary function (PF) and mid- and late-life cognitive function.
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Coronary artery calcium and physical performance as determinants of mortality in older age: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2013
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Coronary artery calcium (CAC) and physical performance have been shown to be associated with mortality, but it is not clear whether one of them modifies the association. We investigated the association between the extent of CAC and physical performance among older individuals and explored these individual and combined effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and non-CVD mortality.
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Insights into the genetic architecture of early stage age-related macular degeneration: a genome-wide association study meta-analysis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Genetic factors explain a majority of risk variance for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for late AMD implicate genes in complement, inflammatory and lipid pathways, the genetic architecture of early AMD has been relatively under studied. We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis of early AMD, including 4,089 individuals with prevalent signs of early AMD (soft drusen and/or retinal pigment epithelial changes) and 20,453 individuals without these signs. For various published late AMD risk loci, we also compared effect sizes between early and late AMD using an additional 484 individuals with prevalent late AMD. GWAS meta-analysis confirmed previously reported association of variants at the complement factor H (CFH) (peak P?=?1.5×10(-31)) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) (P?=?4.3×10(-24)) loci, and suggested Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) polymorphisms (rs2075650; P?=?1.1×10(-6)) associated with early AMD. Other possible loci that did not reach GWAS significance included variants in the zinc finger protein gene GLI3 (rs2049622; P?=?8.9×10(-6)) and upstream of GLI2 (rs6721654; P?=?6.5×10(-6)), encoding retinal Sonic hedgehog signalling regulators, and in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene (rs621313; P?=?3.5×10(-6)), involved in melanin biosynthesis. For a range of published, late AMD risk loci, estimated effect sizes were significantly lower for early than late AMD. This study confirms the involvement of multiple established AMD risk variants in early AMD, but suggests weaker genetic effects on the risk of early AMD relative to late AMD. Several biological processes were suggested to be potentially specific for early AMD, including pathways regulating RPE cell melanin content and signalling pathways potentially involved in retinal regeneration, generating hypotheses for further investigation.
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Similar decline in mortality rate of older persons with and without type 2 diabetes between 1993 and 2004 the Icelandic population-based Reykjavik and AGES-Reykjavik cohort studies.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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A decline in mortality rates due to cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality has led to increased life expectancy in the Western world in recent decades. At the same time, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, a disease associated with a twofold excess risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, has been increasing. The objective of this study was to estimate the secular trend of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality rates in two population-based cohorts of older persons, with and without type 2 diabetes, examined 11?years apart.
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Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value?=?2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.
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Milk intake in early life and risk of advanced prostate cancer.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2011
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The authors investigated whether early-life residency in certain areas of Iceland marked by distinct differences in milk intake was associated with risk of prostate cancer in a population-based cohort of 8,894 men born between 1907 and 1935. Through linkage to cancer and mortality registers, the men were followed for prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality from study entry (in waves from 1967 to 1987) through 2009. In 2002-2006, a subgroup of 2,268 participants reported their milk intake in early, mid-, and current life. During a mean follow-up period of 24.3 years, 1,123 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, including 371 with advanced disease (stage 3 or higher or prostate cancer death). Compared with early-life residency in the capital area, rural residency in the first 20 years of life was marginally associated with increased risk of advanced prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97, 1.73), particularly among men born before 1920 (hazard ratio = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.56). Daily milk consumption in adolescence (vs. less than daily), but not in midlife or currently, was associated with a 3.2-fold risk of advanced prostate cancer (95% CI: 1.25, 8.28). These data suggest that frequent milk intake in adolescence increases risk of advanced prostate cancer.
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Genome-wide association study for coronary artery calcification with follow-up in myocardial infarction.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2011
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Coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by computed tomography is a noninvasive measure of coronary atherosclerosis, which underlies most cases of myocardial infarction (MI). We sought to identify common genetic variants associated with CAC and further investigate their associations with MI.
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Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2011
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Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P<0.001). Carotid pulse pressure, pulsatility index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were each associated with increased risk for silent subcortical infarcts (hazard ratios of 1.62-1.71 per standard deviation, P<0.002). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was associated with higher white matter hyperintensity volume (0.108 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.018). Pulsatility index was associated with lower whole brain (-0.127 ± 0.037 SD/SD, P<0.001), grey matter (-0.079 ± 0.038 SD/SD, P = 0.038) and white matter (-0.128 ± 0.039 SD/SD, P<0.001) volumes. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (-0.095 ± 0.043 SD/SD, P = 0.028) and carotid pulse pressure (-0.114 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.013) were associated with lower memory scores. Pulsatility index was associated with lower memory scores (-0.165 ± 0.039 SD/SD, P<0.001), slower processing speed (-0.118 ± 0.033 SD/SD, P<0.001) and worse performance on tests assessing executive function (-0.155 ± 0.041 SD/SD, P<0.001). When magnetic resonance imaging measures (grey and white matter volumes, white matter hyperintensity volumes and prevalent subcortical infarcts) were included in cognitive models, haemodynamic associations were attenuated or no longer significant, consistent with the hypothesis that increased aortic stiffness and excessive flow pulsatility damage the microcirculation, leading to quantifiable tissue damage and reduced cognitive performance. Marked stiffening of the aorta is associated with reduced wave reflection at the interface between carotid and aorta, transmission of excessive flow pulsatility into the brain, microvascular structural brain damage and lower scores in various cognitive domains.
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Common genetic variation in the 3-BCL11B gene desert is associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and excess cardiovascular disease risk: the AortaGen Consortium.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2011
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Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) is a heritable measure of aortic stiffness that is strongly associated with increased risk for major cardiovascular disease events.
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Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.
, Georg B Ehret, Patricia B Munroe, Kenneth M Rice, Murielle Bochud, Andrew D Johnson, Daniel I Chasman, Albert V Smith, Martin D Tobin, Germaine C Verwoert, Shih-Jen Hwang, Vasyl Pihur, Peter Vollenweider, Paul F O'Reilly, Najaf Amin, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Alexander Teumer, Nicole L Glazer, Lenore Launer, Jing Hua Zhao, Yurii Aulchenko, Simon Heath, Siim Sõber, Afshin Parsa, Jian'an Luan, Pankaj Arora, Abbas Dehghan, Feng Zhang, Gavin Lucas, Andrew A Hicks, Anne U Jackson, John F Peden, Toshiko Tanaka, Sarah H Wild, Igor Rudan, Wilmar Igl, Yuri Milaneschi, Alex N Parker, Cristiano Fava, John C Chambers, Ervin R Fox, Meena Kumari, Min Jin Go, Pim van der Harst, Wen Hong Linda Kao, Marketa Sjögren, D G Vinay, Myriam Alexander, Yasuharu Tabara, Sue Shaw-Hawkins, Peter H Whincup, Yongmei Liu, Gang Shi, Johanna Kuusisto, Bamidele Tayo, Mark Seielstad, Xueling Sim, Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, Terho Lehtimäki, Giuseppe Matullo, Ying Wu, Tom R Gaunt, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Matthew N Cooper, Carl G P Platou, Elin Org, Rebecca Hardy, Santosh Dahgam, Jutta Palmen, Veronique Vitart, Peter S Braund, Tatiana Kuznetsova, Cuno S P M Uiterwaal, Adebowale Adeyemo, Walter Palmas, Harry Campbell, Barbara Ludwig, Maciej Tomaszewski, Ioanna Tzoulaki, Nicholette D Palmer, Thor Aspelund, Melissa Garcia, Yen-Pei C Chang, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Nanette I Steinle, Diederick E Grobbee, Dan E Arking, Sharon L Kardia, Alanna C Morrison, Dena Hernandez, Samer Najjar, Wendy L McArdle, David Hadley, Morris J Brown, John M Connell, Aroon D Hingorani, Ian N M Day, Debbie A Lawlor, John P Beilby, Robert W Lawrence, Robert Clarke, Jemma C Hopewell, Halit Ongen, Albert W Dreisbach, Yali Li, J Hunter Young, Joshua C Bis, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Linda S Adair, Nanette R Lee, Ming-Huei Chen, Matthias Olden, Cristian Pattaro, Judith A Hoffman Bolton, Anna Köttgen, Sven Bergmann, Vincent Mooser, Nish Chaturvedi, Timothy M Frayling, Muhammad Islam, Tazeen H Jafar, Jeanette Erdmann, Smita R Kulkarni, Stefan R Bornstein, Jürgen Gräßler, Leif Groop, Benjamin F Voight, Johannes Kettunen, Philip Howard, Andrew Taylor, Simonetta Guarrera, Fulvio Ricceri, Valur Emilsson, Andrew Plump, Inês Barroso, Kay-Tee Khaw, Alan B Weder, Steven C Hunt, Yan V Sun, Richard N Bergman, Francis S Collins, Lori L Bonnycastle, Laura J Scott, Heather M Stringham, Leena Peltonen, Markus Perola, Erkki Vartiainen, Stefan-Martin Brand, Jan A Staessen, Thomas J Wang, Paul R Burton, María Soler Artigas, Yanbin Dong, Harold Snieder, Xiaoling Wang, Haidong Zhu, Kurt K Lohman, Megan E Rudock, Susan R Heckbert, Nicholas L Smith, Kerri L Wiggins, Ayo Doumatey, Daniel Shriner, Gudrun Veldre, Margus Viigimaa, Sanjay Kinra, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, Vikal Tripathy, Carl D Langefeld, Annika Rosengren, Dag S Thelle, Anna Maria Corsi, Andrew Singleton, Terrence Forrester, Gina Hilton, Colin A McKenzie, Tunde Salako, Naoharu Iwai, Yoshikuni Kita, Toshio Ogihara, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Satoshi Umemura, Susana Eyheramendy, Thomas Meitinger, H-Erich Wichmann, Yoon Shin Cho, Hyung-Lae Kim, Jong-Young Lee, James Scott, Joban S Sehmi, Weihua Zhang, Bo Hedblad, Peter Nilsson, George Davey Smith, Andrew Wong, Narisu Narisu, Alena Stančáková, Leslie J Raffel, Jie Yao, Sekar Kathiresan, Christopher J O'Donnell, Stephen M Schwartz, M Arfan Ikram, W T Longstreth, Thomas H Mosley, Sudha Seshadri, Nick R G Shrine, Louise V Wain, Mario A Morken, Amy J Swift, Jaana Laitinen, Inga Prokopenko, Paavo Zitting, Jackie A Cooper, Steve E Humphries, John Danesh, Asif Rasheed, Anuj Goel, Anders Hamsten, Hugh Watkins, Stephan J L Bakker, Wiek H van Gilst, Charles S Janipalli, K Radha Mani, Chittaranjan S Yajnik, Albert Hofman, Francesco U S Mattace-Raso, Ben A Oostra, Ayse Demirkan, Aaron Isaacs, Fernando Rivadeneira, Edward G Lakatta, Marco Orrù, Angelo Scuteri, Mika Ala-Korpela, Antti J Kangas, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Pasi Soininen, Taru Tukiainen, Peter Würtz, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Marcus Dörr, Heyo K Kroemer, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Pilar Galán, Serge Hercberg, Mark Lathrop, Diana Zelenika, Panos Deloukas, Massimo Mangino, Tim D Spector, Guangju Zhai, James F Meschia, Michael A Nalls, Pankaj Sharma, Janos Terzic, M V Kranthi Kumar, Matthew Denniff, Ewa Zukowska-Szczechowska, Lynne E Wagenknecht, F Gerald R Fowkes, Fadi J Charchar, Peter E H Schwarz, Caroline Hayward, Xiuqing Guo, Charles Rotimi, Michiel L Bots, Eva Brand, Nilesh J Samani, Ozren Polašek, Philippa J Talmud, Fredrik Nyberg, Diana Kuh, Maris Laan, Kristian Hveem, Lyle J Palmer, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Juan P Casas, Karen L Mohlke, Paolo Vineis, Olli Raitakari, Santhi K Ganesh, Tien Y Wong, E Shyong Tai, Richard S Cooper, Markku Laakso, Dabeeru C Rao, Tamara B Harris, Richard W Morris, Anna F Dominiczak, Mika Kivimäki, Michael G Marmot, Tetsuro Miki, Danish Saleheen, Giriraj R Chandak, Josef Coresh, Gerjan Navis, Veikko Salomaa, Bok-Ghee Han, Xiaofeng Zhu, Jaspal S Kooner, Olle Melander, Paul M Ridker, Stefania Bandinelli, Ulf B Gyllensten, Alan F Wright, James F Wilson, Luigi Ferrucci, Martin Farrall, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Peter P Pramstaller, Roberto Elosua, Nicole Soranzo, Eric J G Sijbrands, David Altshuler, Ruth J F Loos, Alan R Shuldiner, Christian Gieger, Pierre Meneton, André G Uitterlinden, Nicholas J Wareham, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jerome I Rotter, Rainer Rettig, Manuela Uda, David P Strachan, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Jacques S Beckmann, Eric Boerwinkle, Ramachandran S Vasan, Michael Boehnke, Martin G Larson, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Bruce M Psaty, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Aravinda Chakravarti, Paul Elliott, Cornelia M van Duijn, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Daniel Levy, Mark J Caulfield, Toby Johnson.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (?140?mm?Hg systolic blood pressure or? ?90?mm?Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.
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Effects of statin medication on mortality risk associated with type 2 diabetes in older persons: the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2011
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To examine if the beneficial effect of statin medication on mortality seen in randomised clinical trials of type 2 diabetes applies equally to observational studies in the general population of older people.
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Genome-wide association studies of cerebral white matter lesion burden: the CHARGE consortium.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2011
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White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) detectable by magnetic resonance imaging are part of the spectrum of vascular injury associated with aging of the brain and are thought to reflect ischemic damage to the small deep cerebral vessels. WMHs are associated with an increased risk of cognitive and motor dysfunction, dementia, depression, and stroke. Despite a significant heritability, few genetic loci influencing WMH burden have been identified.
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[Treatment of type 1 diabetes with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in adults in Iceland].
Laeknabladid
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect and safety of CSII treatment in individuals 18 years and older with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Iceland.
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Childhood growth and adult hypertension in a population of high birth weight.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2011
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Low birth weight has consistently been associated with increased adult blood pressure. The relative importance of childhood growth is, however, less well established. This study examined sex-specific associations between childhood growth and adult blood pressure in 2120 subjects born from 1921 to 1935 in Reykjavik who were recruited into a longitudinal study in 1967-1991. Size at birth and growth at regular intervals between 8 and 13 years were collected from national archives. Hypertensive males did not differ from normotensive males at birth but were increasingly taller and of higher body mass index between 8 and 13 years. No differences in adult height were observed between hypertensive and normotensive males. For boys, growth-velocity (change in growth per year) for body mass index and height between 8 to 13 years was positively associated (P<0.05) with adult blood pressure. The association for body mass index-velocity was fully accounted for by concurrent body size, whereas height-velocity was independent of birth weight and concurrent body size. Males in the highest compared with the lowest tertile in the height-velocity distribution had 66% increased risks of hypertension (95% CI: 15% to 139% increased risks of hypertension) corresponding with 5.0 mm Hg increase (95% CI: 1.5 to 8.5 mm Hg increase) and 3.1 mm Hg increase (95% CI: 1.1 to 5.0 mm Hg increase) in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively. Hypertensive females weighed less at birth but did not differ markedly from normotensive girls between 8 and 13 years, and no association was observed for growth-velocity. In conclusion, rapid linear growth between 8 and 13 years predicts elevated adult blood pressure in boys. This association is likely to reflect relatively early onset of puberty among hypertensive males.
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Trends in the incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation in Iceland and future projections.
Europace
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2011
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Data are scarce on the epidemiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Europe. The aim of this study was to examine recent trends in the incidence and prevalence of AF and project the prevalence to the year 2050.
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Genome-wide association and large-scale follow up identifies 16 new loci influencing lung function.
María Soler Artigas, Daan W Loth, Louise V Wain, Sina A Gharib, Ma'en Obeidat, Wenbo Tang, Guangju Zhai, Jing Hua Zhao, Albert Vernon Smith, Jennifer E Huffman, Eva Albrecht, Catherine M Jackson, David M Evans, Gemma Cadby, Myriam Fornage, Ani Manichaikul, Lorna M Lopez, Toby Johnson, Melinda C Aldrich, Thor Aspelund, Inês Barroso, Harry Campbell, Patricia A Cassano, David J Couper, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Nora Franceschini, Melissa Garcia, Christian Gieger, Gauti Kjartan Gislason, Ivica Grković, Christopher J Hammond, Dana B Hancock, Tamara B Harris, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Susan R Heckbert, Markku Heliövaara, Georg Homuth, Pirro G Hysi, Alan L James, Stipan Janković, Bonnie R Joubert, Stefan Karrasch, Norman Klopp, Beate Koch, Stephen B Kritchevsky, Lenore J Launer, Yongmei Liu, Laura R Loehr, Kurt Lohman, Ruth J F Loos, Thomas Lumley, Khalid A Al Balushi, Wei Q Ang, R Graham Barr, John Beilby, John D Blakey, Mladen Boban, Vesna Boraska, Jonas Brisman, John R Britton, Guy G Brusselle, Cyrus Cooper, Ivan Curjuric, Santosh Dahgam, Ian J Deary, Shah Ebrahim, Mark Eijgelsheim, Clyde Francks, Darya Gaysina, Raquel Granell, Xiangjun Gu, John L Hankinson, Rebecca Hardy, Sarah E Harris, John Henderson, Amanda Henry, Aroon D Hingorani, Albert Hofman, Patrick G Holt, Jennie Hui, Michael L Hunter, Medea Imboden, Karen A Jameson, Shona M Kerr, Ivana Kolčić, Florian Kronenberg, Jason Z Liu, Jonathan Marchini, Tricia McKeever, Andrew D Morris, Anna-Carin Olin, David J Porteous, Dirkje S Postma, Stephen S Rich, Susan M Ring, Fernando Rivadeneira, Thierry Rochat, Avan Aihie Sayer, Ian Sayers, Peter D Sly, George Davey Smith, Akshay Sood, John M Starr, André G Uitterlinden, Judith M Vonk, S Goya Wannamethee, Peter H Whincup, Cisca Wijmenga, O Dale Williams, Andrew Wong, Massimo Mangino, Kristin D Marciante, Wendy L McArdle, Bernd Meibohm, Alanna C Morrison, Kari E North, Ernst Omenaas, Lyle J Palmer, Kirsi H Pietiläinen, Isabelle Pin, Ozren Pola Sbreve Ek, Anneli Pouta, Bruce M Psaty, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Taina Rantanen, Samuli Ripatti, Jerome I Rotter, Igor Rudan, Alicja R Rudnicka, Holger Schulz, So-Youn Shin, Tim D Spector, Ida Surakka, Veronique Vitart, Henry Völzke, Nicholas J Wareham, Nicole M Warrington, H-Erich Wichmann, Sarah H Wild, Jemma B Wilk, Matthias Wjst, Alan F Wright, Lina Zgaga, Tatijana Zemunik, Craig E Pennell, Fredrik Nyberg, Diana Kuh, John W Holloway, H Marike Boezen, Debbie A Lawlor, Richard W Morris, Nicole Probst-Hensch, , Jaakko Kaprio, James F Wilson, Caroline Hayward, Mika Kähönen, Joachim Heinrich, Arthur W Musk, Deborah L Jarvis, Sven Gläser, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Bruno H Ch Stricker, Paul Elliott, George T O'Connor, David P Strachan, Stephanie J London, Ian P Hall, Vilmundur Gudnason, Martin D Tobin.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Pulmonary function measures reflect respiratory health and are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We tested genome-wide association with forced expiratory volume in 1 second and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity in 48,201 individuals of European ancestry with follow up of the top associations in up to an additional 46,411 individuals. We identified new regions showing association (combined P < 5 × 10(-8)) with pulmonary function in or near MFAP2, TGFB2, HDAC4, RARB, MECOM (also known as EVI1), SPATA9, ARMC2, NCR3, ZKSCAN3, CDC123, C10orf11, LRP1, CCDC38, MMP15, CFDP1 and KCNE2. Identification of these 16 new loci may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating pulmonary function and into molecular targets for future therapy to alleviate reduced lung function.
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Brain tissue volumes in the general population of the elderly: the AGES-Reykjavik study.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2011
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Imaging studies have reported conflicting findings on how brain structure differs with age and sex. This may be explained by discrepancies and limitations in study population and study design. We report a study on brain tissue volumes in one of the largest cohorts of individuals studied to date of subjects with high mean age (mean ± standard deviation (SD) 76 ± 6 years). These analyses are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans acquired at baseline on 4303 non-demented elderly, and 367 who had a second MRI, on average 2.5 ± 0.2 years later. Tissue segmentation was performed with an automatic image analysis pipeline. Total brain parenchymal (TBP) volume decreased with increasing age while there was an increase in white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in both sexes. A reduction in both normal white matter (NWM)- and gray matter (GM) volume contributed to the brain shrinkage. After adjusting for intra-cranial volume, women had larger brain volumes compared to men (3.32%, p < 0.001) for TBP volume in the cross-sectional analysis. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant age-sex interaction in TBP volume with a greater rate of annual change in men (-0.70%, 95%CI: -0.78% to -0.63%) than women (-0.55%, 95%CI: -0.61% to -0.49%). The annual change in the cross-sectional data was approximately 40% less than the annual change in the longitudinal data and did not show significant age-sex interaction. The findings indicate that the cross-sectional data underestimate the rate of change in tissue volumes with age as the longitudinal data show greater rate of change in tissue volumes with age for all tissues.
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Distribution of cortical bone in the femoral neck and hip fracture: a prospective case-control analysis of 143 incident hip fractures; the AGES-REYKJAVIK Study.
Bone
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2011
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In this prospective nested case-control study we analyzed the circumferential differences in estimated cortical thickness (Est CTh) of the mid femoral neck as a risk factor for osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly women and men. Segmental QCT analysis of the mid femoral neck was applied to assess cortical thickness in anatomical quadrants. The superior region of the femoral neck was a stronger predictor for hip fracture than the inferior region, particularly in men. There were significant gender differences in Est CTh measurements in the control group but not in the case group. In multivariable analysis for risk of femoral neck (FN) fracture, Est CTh in the supero-anterior (SA) quadrant was significant in both women and men, and remained a significant predictor after adjustment for FN areal BMD (aBMD, dimensions g/cm², DXA-like), (p=0.05 and p<0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, Est CTh in the SA quadrant best discriminated cases (n=143) from controls (n=298), especially in men. Cortical thinning superiorly in the hip might be of importance in determining resistance to fracture.
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The presence of total knee or hip replacements due to osteoarthritis enhances the positive association between hand osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis in women: the AGES-Reykjavik study.
Ann. Rheum. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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This study examines the relationship between total knee replacements (TKR), total hip replacements (THR) or replacements of either joint (total joint replacement; TJR) due to osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis in a large population-based study.
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CUBN is a gene locus for albuminuria.
Carsten A Böger, Ming-Huei Chen, Adrienne Tin, Matthias Olden, Anna Köttgen, Ian H de Boer, Christian Fuchsberger, Conall M O'Seaghdha, Cristian Pattaro, Alexander Teumer, Ching-Ti Liu, Nicole L Glazer, Man Li, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Toshiko Tanaka, Carmen A Peralta, Zoltan Kutalik, Jian'an Luan, Jing Hua Zhao, Shih-Jen Hwang, Ermeg Akylbekova, Holly Kramer, Pim van der Harst, Albert V Smith, Kurt Lohman, Mariza de Andrade, Caroline Hayward, Barbara Kollerits, Anke Tönjes, Thor Aspelund, Erik Ingelsson, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Lenore J Launer, Tamara B Harris, Alan R Shuldiner, Braxton D Mitchell, Dan E Arking, Nora Franceschini, Eric Boerwinkle, Josephine Egan, Dena Hernandez, Muredach Reilly, Raymond R Townsend, Thomas Lumley, David S Siscovick, Bruce M Psaty, Bryan Kestenbaum, Talin Haritunians, Sven Bergmann, Peter Vollenweider, Gérard Waeber, Vincent Mooser, Dawn Waterworth, Andrew D Johnson, Jose C Florez, James B Meigs, Xiaoning Lu, Stephen T Turner, Elizabeth J Atkinson, Tennille S Leak, Knut Aasarød, Frank Skorpen, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Thomas Illig, Jens Baumert, Wolfgang Koenig, Bernhard K Krämer, Olivier Devuyst, Josyf C Mychaleckyj, Cosetta Minelli, Stephan J L Bakker, Lyudmyla Kedenko, Bernhard Paulweber, Stefan Coassin, Karlhans Endlich, Heyo K Kroemer, Reiner Biffar, Sylvia Stracke, Henry Völzke, Michael Stumvoll, Reedik Mägi, Harry Campbell, Veronique Vitart, Nicholas D Hastie, Vilmundur Gudnason, Sharon L R Kardia, Yongmei Liu, Ozren Polašek, Gary Curhan, Florian Kronenberg, Inga Prokopenko, Igor Rudan, Johan Arnlöv, Stein Hallan, Gerjan Navis, , Afshin Parsa, Luigi Ferrucci, Josef Coresh, Michael G Shlipak, Shelley B Bull, Nicholas J Paterson, H-Erich Wichmann, Nicholas J Wareham, Ruth J F Loos, Jerome I Rotter, Peter P Pramstaller, L Adrienne Cupples, Jacques S Beckmann, Qiong Yang, Iris M Heid, Rainer Rettig, Albert W Dreisbach, Murielle Bochud, Caroline S Fox, W H L Kao.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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Identification of genetic risk factors for albuminuria may alter strategies for early prevention of CKD progression, particularly among patients with diabetes. Little is known about the influence of common genetic variants on albuminuria in both general and diabetic populations. We performed a meta-analysis of data from 63,153 individuals of European ancestry with genotype information from genome-wide association studies (CKDGen Consortium) and from a large candidate gene study (CARe Consortium) to identify susceptibility loci for the quantitative trait urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and the clinical diagnosis microalbuminuria. We identified an association between a missense variant (I2984V) in the CUBN gene, which encodes cubilin, and both UACR (P = 1.1 × 10(-11)) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.001). We observed similar associations among 6981 African Americans in the CARe Consortium. The associations between this variant and both UACR and microalbuminuria were significant in individuals of European ancestry regardless of diabetes status. Finally, this variant associated with a 41% increased risk for the development of persistent microalbuminuria during 20 years of follow-up among 1304 participants with type 1 diabetes in the prospective DCCT/EDIC Study. In summary, we identified a missense CUBN variant that associates with levels of albuminuria in both the general population and in individuals with diabetes.
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Brain tissue volumes by APOE genotype and leisure activity-the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Neurobiol. Aging
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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This study investigates the association of the APOE ?4 allele and leisure activity with brain tissue volumes, including white matter hyperintensities (WMH), in a population-based cohort of 4303 nondemented individuals, aged 66-96 years. APOE ?4 carriers were shown to have greater WMH and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes than noncarriers but smaller gray matter (GM) volumes. There was no significant difference in white matter (WM) and total brain parenchymal (TBP) volumes between APOE ?4 carriers and noncarriers. Tests for linear trend showed that individuals with lower leisure activity levels had greater WMH and CSF volumes, smaller TBP, WM and GM volumes than those with the highest levels of participation. The significant positive trend of the leisure activity with the brain tissue volumes was observed in the APOE ?4 carriers as well as in noncarriers after adjustment for demographic and health factors. These cross-sectional data suggest leisure activity is associated with tissue volumes in the brain irrespective of the APOE ?4 risk allele status.
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Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.
Louise V Wain, Germaine C Verwoert, Paul F O'Reilly, Gang Shi, Toby Johnson, Andrew D Johnson, Murielle Bochud, Kenneth M Rice, Peter Henneman, Albert V Smith, Georg B Ehret, Najaf Amin, Martin G Larson, Vincent Mooser, David Hadley, Marcus Dörr, Joshua C Bis, Thor Aspelund, Tonu Esko, A Cecile J W Janssens, Jing Hua Zhao, Simon Heath, Maris Laan, Jingyuan Fu, Giorgio Pistis, Jian'an Luan, Pankaj Arora, Gavin Lucas, Nicola Pirastu, Irene Pichler, Anne U Jackson, Rebecca J Webster, Feng Zhang, John F Peden, Helena Schmidt, Toshiko Tanaka, Harry Campbell, Wilmar Igl, Yuri Milaneschi, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Veronique Vitart, Daniel I Chasman, Stella Trompet, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Behrooz Z Alizadeh, John C Chambers, Xiuqing Guo, Terho Lehtimäki, Brigitte Kühnel, Lorna M Lopez, Ozren Polašek, Mladen Boban, Christopher P Nelson, Alanna C Morrison, Vasyl Pihur, Santhi K Ganesh, Albert Hofman, Suman Kundu, Francesco U S Mattace-Raso, Fernando Rivadeneira, Eric J G Sijbrands, André G Uitterlinden, Shih-Jen Hwang, Ramachandran S Vasan, Thomas J Wang, Sven Bergmann, Peter Vollenweider, Gérard Waeber, Jaana Laitinen, Anneli Pouta, Paavo Zitting, Wendy L McArdle, Heyo K Kroemer, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Nicole L Glazer, Kent D Taylor, Tamara B Harris, Helene Alavere, Toomas Haller, Aime Keis, Mari-Liis Tammesoo, Yurii Aulchenko, Inês Barroso, Kay-Tee Khaw, Pilar Galán, Serge Hercberg, Mark Lathrop, Susana Eyheramendy, Elin Org, Siim Sõber, Xiaowen Lu, Ilja M Nolte, Brenda W Penninx, Tanguy Corre, Corrado Masciullo, Cinzia Sala, Leif Groop, Benjamin F Voight, Olle Melander, Christopher J O'Donnell, Veikko Salomaa, Adamo Pio D'adamo, Antonella Fabretto, Flavio Faletra, Sheila Ulivi, Fabiola M Del Greco, Maurizio Facheris, Francis S Collins, Richard N Bergman, John P Beilby, Joseph Hung, A William Musk, Massimo Mangino, So-Youn Shin, Nicole Soranzo, Hugh Watkins, Anuj Goel, Anders Hamsten, Pierre Gider, Marisa Loitfelder, Marion Zeginigg, Dena Hernandez, Samer S Najjar, Pau Navarro, Sarah H Wild, Anna Maria Corsi, Andrew Singleton, Eco J C de Geus, Gonneke Willemsen, Alex N Parker, Lynda M Rose, Brendan Buckley, David Stott, Marco Orrù, Manuela Uda, , Melanie M van der Klauw, Weihua Zhang, Xinzhong Li, James Scott, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Gregory L Burke, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Angela Döring, Thomas Meitinger, Gail Davies, John M Starr, Valur Emilsson, Andrew Plump, Jan H Lindeman, Peter A C 't Hoen, Inke R König, Janine F Felix, Robert Clarke, Jemma C Hopewell, Halit Ongen, Monique Breteler, Stéphanie Debette, Anita L Destefano, Myriam Fornage, Gary F Mitchell, Nicholas L Smith, Hilma Holm, Kari Stefansson, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Nilesh J Samani, Michael Preuss, Igor Rudan, Caroline Hayward, Ian J Deary, H-Erich Wichmann, Olli T Raitakari, Walter Palmas, Jaspal S Kooner, Ronald P Stolk, J Wouter Jukema, Alan F Wright, Dorret I Boomsma, Stefania Bandinelli, Ulf B Gyllensten, James F Wilson, Luigi Ferrucci, Reinhold Schmidt, Martin Farrall, Tim D Spector, Lyle J Palmer, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Arne Pfeufer, Paolo Gasparini, David Siscovick, David Altshuler, Ruth J F Loos, Daniela Toniolo, Harold Snieder, Christian Gieger, Pierre Meneton, Nicholas J Wareham, Ben A Oostra, Andres Metspalu, Lenore Launer, Rainer Rettig, David P Strachan, Jacques S Beckmann, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Jeanette Erdmann, Ko Willems van Dijk, Eric Boerwinkle, Michael Boehnke, Paul M Ridker, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Aravinda Chakravarti, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Vilmundur Gudnason, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Daniel Levy, Patricia B Munroe, Bruce M Psaty, Mark J Caulfield, Dabeeru C Rao, Martin D Tobin, Paul Elliott, Cornelia M van Duijn.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P = 2.7 × 10(-8) to P = 2.3 × 10(-13)) four new PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV and 11q24.3 near ADAMTS8), two new MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4 and 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both of these traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) that has also recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the new PP loci, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite of that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants, which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings suggest new genetic pathways underlying blood pressure variation, some of which may differentially influence SBP and DBP.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >80 000 subjects identifies multiple loci for C-reactive protein levels.
Abbas Dehghan, Josée Dupuis, Maja Barbalic, Joshua C Bis, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Chen Lu, Niina Pellikka, Henri Wallaschofski, Johannes Kettunen, Peter Henneman, Jens Baumert, David P Strachan, Christian Fuchsberger, Veronique Vitart, James F Wilson, Guillaume Paré, Silvia Naitza, Megan E Rudock, Ida Surakka, Eco J C de Geus, Behrooz Z Alizadeh, Jack Guralnik, Alan Shuldiner, Toshiko Tanaka, Robert Y L Zee, Renate B Schnabel, Vijay Nambi, Maryam Kavousi, Samuli Ripatti, Matthias Nauck, Nicholas L Smith, Albert V Smith, Jouko Sundvall, Paul Scheet, Yongmei Liu, Aimo Ruokonen, Lynda M Rose, Martin G Larson, Ron C Hoogeveen, Nelson B Freimer, Alexander Teumer, Russell P Tracy, Lenore J Launer, Julie E Buring, Jennifer F Yamamoto, Aaron R Folsom, Eric J G Sijbrands, James Pankow, Paul Elliott, John F Keaney, Wei Sun, Antti-Pekka Sarin, João D Fontes, Sunita Badola, Brad C Astor, Albert Hofman, Anneli Pouta, Karl Werdan, Karin H Greiser, Oliver Kuss, Henriette E Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Joachim Thiery, Yalda Jamshidi, Ilja M Nolte, Nicole Soranzo, Timothy D Spector, Henry Völzke, Alexander N Parker, Thor Aspelund, David Bates, Lauren Young, Kim Tsui, David S Siscovick, Xiuqing Guo, Jerome I Rotter, Manuela Uda, David Schlessinger, Igor Rudan, Andrew A Hicks, Brenda W Penninx, Barbara Thorand, Christian Gieger, Joe Coresh, Gonneke Willemsen, Tamara B Harris, André G Uitterlinden, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Kenneth Rice, Dörte Radke, Veikko Salomaa, Ko Willems van Dijk, Eric Boerwinkle, Ramachandran S Vasan, Luigi Ferrucci, Quince D Gibson, Stefania Bandinelli, Harold Snieder, Dorret I Boomsma, Xiangjun Xiao, Harry Campbell, Caroline Hayward, Peter P Pramstaller, Cornelia M van Duijn, Leena Peltonen, Bruce M Psaty, Vilmundur Gudnason, Paul M Ridker, Georg Homuth, Wolfgang Koenig, Christie M Ballantyne, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Emelia J Benjamin, Markus Perola, Daniel I Chasman.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2011
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C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from the CHARGE consortium identifies common variants associated with carotid intima media thickness and plaque.
Joshua C Bis, Maryam Kavousi, Nora Franceschini, Aaron Isaacs, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Ulf Schminke, Wendy S Post, Albert V Smith, L Adrienne Cupples, Hugh S Markus, Reinhold Schmidt, Jennifer E Huffman, Terho Lehtimäki, Jens Baumert, Thomas Münzel, Susan R Heckbert, Abbas Dehghan, Kari North, Ben Oostra, Steve Bevan, Eva-Maria Stoegerer, Caroline Hayward, Olli Raitakari, Christa Meisinger, Arne Schillert, Serena Sanna, Henry Völzke, Yu-Ching Cheng, Bolli Thorsson, Caroline S Fox, Kenneth Rice, Fernando Rivadeneira, Vijay Nambi, Eran Halperin, Katja E Petrovic, Leena Peltonen, H Erich Wichmann, Renate B Schnabel, Marcus Dörr, Afshin Parsa, Thor Aspelund, Serkalem Demissie, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Kent Taylor, André Uitterlinden, David J Couper, Matthias Sitzer, Mika Kähönen, Thomas Illig, Philipp S Wild, Marco Orrù, Jan Lüdemann, Alan R Shuldiner, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Charles C White, Jerome I Rotter, Albert Hofman, Jochen Seissler, Tanja Zeller, Gianluca Usala, Florian Ernst, Lenore J Launer, Ralph B D'Agostino, Daniel H O'Leary, Christie Ballantyne, Joachim Thiery, Andreas Ziegler, Edward G Lakatta, Ravi Kumar Chilukoti, Tamara B Harris, Philip A Wolf, Bruce M Psaty, Joseph F Polak, Xia Li, Wolfgang Rathmann, Manuela Uda, Eric Boerwinkle, Norman Klopp, Helena Schmidt, James F Wilson, Jorma Viikari, Wolfgang Koenig, Stefan Blankenberg, Anne B Newman, Jacqueline Witteman, Gerardo Heiss, Cornelia van Duijn, Angelo Scuteri, Georg Homuth, Braxton D Mitchell, Vilmundur Gudnason, Christopher J O'Donnell, .
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and plaque determined by ultrasonography are established measures of subclinical atherosclerosis that each predicts future cardiovascular disease events. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 31,211 participants of European ancestry from nine large studies in the setting of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. We then sought additional evidence to support our findings among 11,273 individuals using data from seven additional studies. In the combined meta-analysis, we identified three genomic regions associated with common carotid intima media thickness and two different regions associated with the presence of carotid plaque (P < 5 × 10(-8)). The associated SNPs mapped in or near genes related to cellular signaling, lipid metabolism and blood pressure homeostasis, and two of the regions were associated with coronary artery disease (P < 0.006) in the Coronary Artery Disease Genome-Wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium. Our findings may provide new insight into pathways leading to subclinical atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular events.
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Hand Osteoarthritis Severity is Associated with Total Knee Joint Replacements Independently of BMI. The Ages-Reykjavik Study.
Open Rheumatol J
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2011
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To identify factors associated with having total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis in the AGES-Reykjavik Study, a large population based study of elderly Icelanders.
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Chronic kidney disease and risk of major cardiovascular disease and non-vascular mortality: prospective population based cohort study.
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2010
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To quantify associations of chronic kidney disease stages with major cardiovascular disease and non-vascular mortality in the general adult population.
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Multiple genetic loci influence serum urate levels and their relationship with gout and cardiovascular disease risk factors.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2010
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Elevated serum urate levels can lead to gout and are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. We performed a genome-wide association study to search for genetic susceptibility loci for serum urate and gout and investigated the causal nature of the associations of serum urate with gout and selected cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD).
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Personalized epigenomic signatures that are stable over time and covary with body mass index.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2010
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The epigenome consists of non-sequence-based modifications, such as DNA methylation, that are heritable during cell division and that may affect normal phenotypes and predisposition to disease. Here, we have performed an unbiased genome-scale analysis of ~4 million CpG sites in 74 individuals with comprehensive array-based relative methylation (CHARM) analysis. We found 227 regions that showed extreme interindividual variability [variably methylated regions (VMRs)] across the genome, which are enriched for developmental genes based on Gene Ontology analysis. Furthermore, half of these VMRs were stable within individuals over an average of 11 years, and these VMRs defined a personalized epigenomic signature. Four of these VMRs showed covariation with body mass index consistently at two study visits and were located in or near genes previously implicated in regulating body weight or diabetes. This work suggests an epigenetic strategy for identifying patients at risk of common disease.
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The effect of midlife physical activity on cognitive function among older adults: AGES--Reykjavik Study.
J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2010
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There are few studies on the long-term associations of physical activity (PA) to cognition. Here, we examine the association of midlife PA to late-life cognitive function and dementia.
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Correlation of echocardiographic findings with cerebral infarction in elderly adults: the AGES-Reykjavik study.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2010
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Chronic effects of hypertension may be observed in multiple end organs. Previous reports suggest that cardiovascular morphological features can mirror cerebral infarction. In this cross-sectional analysis of elderly subjects, we investigated the relationship of a comprehensive set of echocardiographic measures with cerebral infarction detected by MRI.
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Migraine with aura and risk of cardiovascular and all cause mortality in men and women: prospective cohort study.
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2010
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To estimate whether migraine in mid-life is associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease, other causes, and all causes.
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Analysing the large decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the Icelandic population aged 25-74 between the years 1981 and 2006.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2010
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Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s. We examined how much of the decrease between 1981 and 2006 could be attributed to medical and surgical treatments and how much to changes in cardiovascular risk factors.
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