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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
DETERMINATION OF BLOOD LACTATE TRAINING ZONE BOUNDARIES WITH RATING OF PERCEIVED EXERTION IN RUNNERS.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2014
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This study aimed to determine the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) values corresponding to the blood lactate concentration (BLC) training zone boundaries (2 and 4 mmol.L) in moderately trained runners using the Borg CR-10 scale. Moderately trained runners (n = 95) performed a submaximal incremental test on a treadmill, recording BLC and RPE at every stage. Simple linear regression analysis was used to determine the RPE values corresponding to the BLC training zone boundaries, which revealed that RPE was significantly and strongly correlated with BLC (r= 0.821; P< 0.001; R= 0.675; adjusted R= 0.674; standard error of estimate= 1.18). The prediction equation (RPE= 1.092 × BLC + 2.143) was obtained and RPE values at the BLC training zone boundaries of 2 mmol.L and 4 mmol.L calculated as 4.3 (95% CI, 3.9-4.7) and 6.5 (95% CI, 6.0-7.1), respectively. In conclusion, the RPE values at the BLC training zone boundaries of 2 mmol.L (4.3) and 4 mmol.L (6.5) were adequately predicted. RPE (4.3 and 6.5) can be used as an affordable tool for controlling intensity in order to maintain the athletes in prescribed zones during training sessions.
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Extracellular GTP is a Potent Water-Transport Regulator via Aquaporin 5 Plasma-Membrane Insertion in M1-CCD Epithelial Cortical Collecting Duct Cells.
Cell. Physiol. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Background/Aims: Extracellular GTP is able to modulate some specific functions in neuron, glia and muscle cell models as it has been demonstrated over the last two decades. In fact, extracellular GTP binds its specific plasma membrane binding sites and induces signal transduction via [Ca(2+)]i increase. We demonstrate, for the first time, that extracellular GTP is able to modulate cell swelling in M1-CCD cortical collecting duct epithelial cells via upregulation of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) expression. Methods: We used videoimaging, immunocitochemistry, flow cytometry, confocal techniques, Western blotting and RT-PCR for protein and gene expression analysis, respectively. Results: We demonstrate that AQP5 mRNA is up-regulated 7 h after the GTP exposure in the cell culture medium, and its protein level is increased after 12-24 h. We show that AQP5 is targeted to the plasma membrane of M1-CCD cells, where it facilitates cell swelling, and that the GTP-dependent AQP5 up-regulation occurs via [Ca(2+)]i increase. Indeed, GTP induces both oscillating and transient [Ca(2+)]i increase, and specifically the oscillating kinetic appears to be responsible for blocking cell cycle in the S-phase while the [Ca(2+)]i influx, with whatever kinetic, seems to be responsible for inducing AQP5 expression. Conclusion: The role of GTP as a regulator of AQP5-mediated water transport in renal cells is of great importance in the physiology of renal epithelia, due to its possible physiopathological implications. GTP-dependent AQP5 expression could act as osmosensor. In addition, the data presented here suggest that GTP might play the same role in other tissues where rapid water transport is required for cell volume regulation and maintenance of the homeostasis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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Myogenic potential of canine craniofacial satellite cells.
Front Aging Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The skeletal fibers have different embryological origin; the extraocular and jaw-closer muscles develop from prechordal mesoderm while the limb and trunk muscles from somites. These different origins characterize also the adult muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells (SCs) and responsible for the fiber growth and regeneration. The physiological properties of presomitic SCs and their epigenetics are poorly studied despite their peculiar characteristics to preserve muscle integrity during chronic muscle degeneration. Here, we isolated SCs from canine somitic [somite-derived muscle (SDM): vastus lateralis, rectus abdominis, gluteus superficialis, biceps femoris, psoas] and presomitic [pre-somite-derived muscle (PSDM): lateral rectus, temporalis, and retractor bulbi] muscles as myogenic progenitor cells from young and old animals. In addition, SDM and PSDM-SCs were obtained also from golden retrievers affected by muscular dystrophy (GRMD). We characterized the lifespan, the myogenic potential and functions, and oxidative stress of both somitic and presomitic SCs with the aim to reveal differences with aging and between healthy and dystrophic animals. The different proliferation rate was consistent with higher telomerase activity in PSDM-SCs compared to SDM-SCs, although restricted at early passages. SDM-SCs express early (Pax7, MyoD) and late (myosin heavy chain, myogenin) myogenic markers differently from PSDM-SCs resulting in a more efficient and faster cell differentiation. Taken together, our results showed that PSDM-SCs elicit a stronger stem cell phenotype compared to SDM ones. Finally, myomiR expression profile reveals a unique epigenetic signature in GRMD SCs and miR-206, highly expressed in dystrophic SCs, seems to play a critical role in muscle degeneration. Thus, miR-206 could represent a potential target for novel therapeutic approaches.
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Infrared imaging in liquid through an extrinsic optical microcavity.
Opt Lett
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2013
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The mutual interference of light scattered inside an extrinsic Fabry-Perot microcavity, fed by a low-coherence light, is exploited to achieve infrared imaging in a liquid environment. The transverse field distribution inside a cavity is shaped by the effect of scattered interfering waves in a lens-free system. Reflectivity and contrast phase maps are extracted through the analysis of the cavity response in the time domain. This approach allows to conjugate noninvasivity, subdiffraction imaging, possible quantitative evaluation of dielectric constants and infrared spectroscopy, making it suitable for biological applications.
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A Potent (R)-alpha-bis-lipoyl Derivative Containing 8-Hydroxyquinoline Scaffold: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Its Neuroprotective Capabilities in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.
Pharmaceuticals (Basel)
PUBLISHED: 11-27-2013
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A novel bis-lipoyl derivative containing 8-hydroxyquinoline scaffold (LA-HQ-LA, 5) was synthesized as a new multifunctional drug candidate with antioxidant, chelant, and neuroprotective properties for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. We have investigated the potential effectiveness of LA-HQ-LA against the cytotoxicity induced by 6-OHDA and H2O2 on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Our outcomes showed that LA-HQ-LA resulted in significant neuroprotective and antioxidant effects against H2O2- and 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, as assessed by MTT assay. In particular, it showed potent neuroprotective effects against 6-OHDA in RA/PMA differentiated cells at all the tested concentrations.
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Fast ultrahigh-density writing of low-conductivity patterns on semiconducting polymers.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
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The exceptional interest in improving the limitations of data storage, molecular electronics and optoelectronics has promoted the development of an ever increasing number of techniques used to pattern polymers at micro and nanoscale. Most of them rely on atomic force microscopy to thermally or electrostatically induce mass transport, thereby creating topographic features. Here we show that the mechanical interaction between the tip of the atomic force microscope and the surface of ?-conjugated polymeric films produces a local increase of molecular disorder, inducing a localized lowering of the semiconductor conductivity, not associated to detectable modifications in the surface topography. This phenomenon allows for the swift production of low-conductivity patterns on the film surface at a speed exceeding 20??m?s?¹; paths have a resolution in the order of the tip size (20?nm) and are detected by a conducting-atomic force microscopy tip in the conductivity maps.
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A method for the ultrastructural preservation of tiny percutaneous needle biopsy material from skeletal muscle.
Int. J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Skeletal muscle biopsies require transecting the muscle fibers resulting, in structural damage near the cut ends. Classically, the optimal ultrastructural preservation has been obtained by the use of relatively large biopsies in which the tissue fibers are restrained by ligating to a suitable retaining support prior to excision, and by examining regions at some distance from the cut ends. However, these methods require invasive surgical procedures. In the present study, we present and substantiate an alternative approach that allows for the excellent ultrastructural preservation of needle biopsy samples, even the very small samples obtained through tiny percutaneous needle biopsy (TPNB). TPNB represents an advantage, relative to standard muscle biopsy techniques and to other needle biopsies currently in use, as in addition to not requiring a skin incision, it leaves no scars in the muscle and requires an extremely brief recovery period. It is most appropriate for obtaining repeated samples in horizontal studies, e.g., in order to follow changes with athletic training and/or aging in a single individual and for studies of sarcopenic muscles in elderly patients. Due to the small size of the sample, TPNB may present limited usefulness for classical pathology diagnostics. However, it offers the major advantage of allowing multiple samples within a single session and this may be useful under specific circumstances.
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Transcriptional profile of GTP-mediated differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.
Purinergic Signal.
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2011
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Several purine receptors have been localised on skeletal muscle membranes. Previous data support the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine 5-triphosphate (GTP) is an important regulatory factor in the development and function of muscle tissue. We have previously described specific extracellular binding sites for GTP on the plasma membrane of mouse skeletal muscle (C2C12) cells. Extracellular GTP induces an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations that results in membrane hyperpolarisation through Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, as has been demonstrated by patch-clamp experiments. This GTP-evoked increase in intracellular Ca(2+) is due to release of Ca(2+) from intracellular inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive stores. This enhances the expression of the myosin heavy chain in these C2C12 myoblasts and commits them to fuse into multinucleated myotubes, probably via a phosphoinositide-3-kinase-dependent signal-transduction mechanism. To define the signalling of extracellular GTP as an enhancer or modulator of myogenesis, we investigated whether the gene-expression profile of differentiated C2C12 cells (4 and 24 h in culture) is affected by extracellular GTP. To investigate the nuclear activity and target genes modulated by GTP, transcriptional profile analysis and real-time PCR were used. We demonstrate that in the early stages of differentiation, GTP up-regulates genes involved in different pathways associated with myogenic processes, including cytoskeleton structure, the respiratory chain, myogenesis, chromatin reorganisation, cell adhesion, and the Jak/Stat pathway, and down-regulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. GTP also increases the expression of three genes involved in myogenesis, Pp3ca, Gsk3b, and Pax7. Our data suggests that in the myogenic C2C12 cell line, extracellular GTP acts as a differentiative factor in the induction and sustaining of myogenesis.
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Disentangling time in a near-field approach to scanning probe microscopy.
Nanoscale
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
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Microwave microscopy has recently attracted intensive effort, owing to its capability to provide quantitative information about the local composition and the electromagnetic response of a sample. Nonetheless, the interpretation of microwave images remains a challenge as the electromagnetic waves interact with the sample and the surrounding in a multitude of ways following different paths: microwave images are a convolution of all contributions. In this work we show that examining the time evolution of the electromagnetic waves allows us to disentangle each contribution, providing images with striking quality and unexplored scenarios for near-field microscopy.
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Tiny percutaneous needle biopsy: An efficient method for studying cellular and molecular aspects of skeletal muscle in humans.
Int. J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2010
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Needle biopsy is widely used to obtain specimens for physiological, anatomical and biochemical studies of skeletal muscle (SM). We optimized a procedure which we termed tiny percutaneous needle biopsy (TPNB), to efficiently gather good numbers of human satellite cells and single dissociated fibers for the functional study of skeletal muscle; these samples permit isolation of high-quality RNA and sufficient amounts of proteins to allow molecular analysis. Moreover, TPNB showed a clear advantage in that the technique was easier than other procedures used on healthy volunteers in human trials. TPNB is a very safe minor surgical procedure. It is less traumatic than needle aspiration biopsy, and significant complications are improbable. TPNB should become established as an important tool in the investigation of SM and may be employed to study various physiological aspects of SM in human subjects. We suggest that TPNB should also be used in the study of muscle diseases and disorders including muscular dystrophy, congenital myopathy, and metabolic defects.
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Effect of milrinone analogues on intracellular calcium increase in single living H9C2 cardiac cells.
Eur J Med Chem
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2010
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The synthesis of milrinone analogues where the 4-pyridyl moiety was replaced by an ester or amide group is reported. Only amide derivatives are able to support intracellular calcium influx following chemical depolarization with 60 mM KCl in a percentage varying from 20 to 45% of differentiated H9C2 cardiomyocytes. Those cells were differentiated after chronic exposure to 10 nM retinoic acid which induces the expression of voltage-gated calcium channels. Analogues of milrinone containing an ester function did not show significant activity.
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A subpopulation of rat muscle fibers maintains an assessable excitation-contraction coupling mechanism after long-standing denervation despite lost contractility.
J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2009
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To define the time course and potential effects of electrical stimulation on permanently denervated muscle, we evaluated excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) of rat leg muscles during progression to long-term denervation by ultrastructural analysis, specific binding to dihydropyridine receptors, ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR-1), Ca channels and extrusion Ca pumps, gene transcription and translation of Ca-handling proteins, and in vitro mechanical properties and electrophysiological analyses of sarcolemmal passive properties and L-type Ca current (ICa) parameters. We found that in response to long-term denervation: 1) isolated muscle that is unable to twitch in vitro by electrical stimulation has very small myofibers but may show a slow caffeine contracture; 2) only roughly half of the muscle fibers with "voltage-dependent Ca channel activity" are able to contract; 3) the ECC mechanisms are still present and, in part, functional; 4)ECC-related gene expression is upregulated; and 5) at any time point, there are muscle fibers that are more resistant than others to denervation atrophy and disorganization of the ECC apparatus. These results support the hypothesis that prolonged "resting" [Ca] may drive progression of muscle atrophy to degeneration and that electrical stimulation-induced [Ca] modulation may mimic the lost nerve influence, playing a key role in modifying the gene expression of denervated muscle. Hence, these data provide a potential molecular explanation for the muscle recovery that occurs in response to rehabilitation strategies developed based on empirical clinical observations.
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Effects of local vibrations on skeletal muscle trophism in elderly people: mechanical, cellular, and molecular events.
Int. J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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Several studies have examined the effects of vibrations on muscle mass and performance in young healthy people. We studied the effects of vibrations on muscles of elderly male and female volunteers (65-85 years of age) diagnosed with sarcopenia. We applied mechanical vibrations locally (local vibrational training) to the thigh muscles at 300 Hz for a period of 12 weeks, starting with a session of 15 min stimulation once a week and increasing to three sessions of 15 min per week. Treated muscles displayed enhanced maximal isometric strength and increased content of fast MyHC-2X myosin. Single muscle fiber analysis did not show any change in cross-sectional area or in specific tension. Analysis of transcriptional profiles by microarray revealed changes in gene expression after 12 weeks of local vibrational training. In particular, pathways related with energy metabolism, sarcomeric protein balance and oxidative stress response were affected. We conclude that vibration treatment is effective in counteracting the loss of muscular strength associated with sarcopenia and the mode of action of vibration is based on cellular and molecular changes which do not include increase in fiber or muscle size.
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Energetics of karate (kata and kumite techniques) in top-level athletes.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Breath-by-breath O(2) uptake (VO2, L min(-1)) and blood lactate concentration were measured before, during exercise, and recovery in six kata and six kumite karate Word Champions performing a simulated competition. VO2max, maximal anaerobic alactic, and lactic power were also assessed. The total energy cost (VO2TOT mL kg(-1) above resting) of each simulated competition was calculated and subdivided into aerobic, lactic, and alactic fractions. Results showed that (a) no differences between kata and kumite groups in VO2max, height of vertical jump, and Wingate test were found; (b) VO2TOT were 87.8 +/- 6.6 and 82.3 +/- 12.3 mL kg(-1) in kata male and female with a performance time of 138 +/- 4 and 158 +/- 14 s, respectively; 189.0 +/- 14.6 mL kg(-1) in kumite male and 155.8 +/- 38.4 mL kg(-1) in kumite female with a predetermined performance time of 240 +/- 0 and 180 +/- 0 s, respectively; (c) the metabolic power was significantly higher in kumite than in kata athletes (p < or = 0.05 in both gender); (d) aerobic and anaerobic alactic sources, in percentage of the total, were significantly different between gender and disciplines (p < 0.05), while the lactic source was similar; (e) HR ranged between 174 and 187 b min(-1) during simulated competition. In conclusion, kumite appears to require a much higher metabolic power than kata, being the energy source with the aerobic contribution predominant.
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Potassium currents in human myogenic cells from healthy and congenital myotonic dystrophy foetuses.
Cell. Mol. Biol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to record potassium currents in in vitro differentiating myoblasts isolated from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) foetuses carrying 2000 CTG repeats. The fusion of the DM1 myoblasts was reduced in comparison to that of the control cells. The dystrophic muscle cells expressed less voltage-activated K(+) (delayed rectifier and non-inactivating delayed rectifier) and inward rectifier channels than the age-matched control cells. However, the resting membrane potential was not significantly different between the control and the DM1 cells. After four days in a differentiation medium, the dystrophic cells expressed the fast-inactivating transient outward K(+) channels, which were not observed in healthy cells. We suggest that the low level of potassium currents measured in differentiated DM1 cells could be related to their impaired fusion.
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Molecular basis of the myogenic profile of aged human skeletal muscle satellite cells during differentiation.
Exp. Gerontol.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2009
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Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass, strength and function. Human muscle proteins are synthesized at a slower rate in the elderly than in young adults, leading to atrophy and muscle mass loss with a decline in the functional capability. Additionally, aging is accompanied by a decrease in the ability of muscle tissue to regenerate following injury or overuse due to the impairment of intervening satellite cells, in which we previously reported oxidative damage evidences. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of aging on myoblasts and myotubes obtained from human skeletal muscle, and characterize the transcriptional profile as molecular expression patterns in relation to age-dependent modifications in their regenerative capacity. Our data show that the failure to differentiate does not depend on reduced myogenic cell number, but difficulty to complete the differentiation program. Data reported here suggested the following findings: (i) oxidative damage accumulation in molecular substrates, probably due to impaired antioxidant activity and insufficient repair capability, (ii) limited capability of elderly myoblasts to execute a complete differentiation program; restricted fusion, possibly due to altered cytoskeleton turnover and extracellular matrix degradation and (iii) activation of atrophy mechanism by activation of a specific FOXO-dependent program.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.