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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data.
Michael V Holmes, Caroline E Dale, Luisa Zuccolo, Richard J Silverwood, Yiran Guo, Zheng Ye, David Prieto-Merino, Abbas Dehghan, Stella Trompet, Andrew Wong, Alana Cavadino, Dagmar Drogan, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Shanshan Li, Ajay Yesupriya, Maarten Leusink, Johan Sundström, Jaroslav A Hubacek, Hynek Pikhart, Daniel I Swerdlow, Andrie G Panayiotou, Svetlana A Borinskaya, Chris Finan, Sonia Shah, Karoline B Kuchenbaecker, Tina Shah, Jorgen Engmann, Lasse Folkersen, Per Eriksson, Fulvio Ricceri, Olle Melander, Carlotta Sacerdote, Dale M Gamble, Sruti Rayaprolu, Owen A Ross, Stela McLachlan, Olga Vikhireva, Ivonne Sluijs, Robert A Scott, Vera Adamkova, Leon Flicker, Frank M van Bockxmeer, Christine Power, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Tom Meade, Michael G Marmot, José M Ferro, Sofia Paulos-Pinheiro, Steve E Humphries, Philippa J Talmud, Irene Mateo Leach, Niek Verweij, Allan Linneberg, Tea Skaaby, Pieter A Doevendans, Maarten J Cramer, Pim van der Harst, Olaf H Klungel, Nicole F Dowling, Anna F Dominiczak, Meena Kumari, Andrew N Nicolaides, Cornelia Weikert, Heiner Boeing, Shah Ebrahim, Tom R Gaunt, Jackie F Price, Lars Lannfelt, Anne Peasey, Růžena Kubinova, Andrzej Pająk, Sofia Malyutina, Mikhail I Voevoda, Abdonas Tamosiunas, Anke H Maitland-van der Zee, Paul E Norman, Graeme J Hankey, Manuela M Bergmann, Albert Hofman, Oscar H Franco, Jackie Cooper, Jutta Palmen, Wilko Spiering, Pim A de Jong, Diana Kuh, Rebecca Hardy, André G Uitterlinden, M Arfan Ikram, Ian Ford, Elina Hyppönen, Osvaldo P Almeida, Nicholas J Wareham, Kay-Tee Khaw, Anders Hamsten, Lise Lotte N Husemoen, Anne Tjønneland, Janne S Tolstrup, Eric Rimm, Joline W J Beulens, W M Monique Verschuren, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Marten H Hofker, S Goya Wannamethee, Peter H Whincup, Richard Morris, Astrid M Vicente, Hugh Watkins, Martin Farrall, J Wouter Jukema, James Meschia, L Adrienne Cupples, Stephen J Sharp, Myriam Fornage, Charles Kooperberg, Andrea Z LaCroix, James Y Dai, Matthew B Lanktree, David S Siscovick, Eric Jorgenson, Bonnie Spring, Josef Coresh, Yun R Li, Sarah G Buxbaum, Pamela J Schreiner, R Curtis Ellison, Michael Y Tsai, Sanjay R Patel, Susan Redline, Andrew D Johnson, Ron C Hoogeveen, Hakon Hakonarson, Jerome I Rotter, Eric Boerwinkle, Paul I W de Bakker, Mika Kivimäki, Folkert W Asselbergs, Naveed Sattar, Debbie A Lawlor, John Whittaker, George Davey Smith, Kenneth Mukamal, Bruce M Psaty, James G Wilson, Leslie A Lange, Ajna Hamidovic, Aroon D Hingorani, Børge G Nordestgaard, Martin Bobak, David A Leon, Claudia Langenberg, Tom M Palmer, Alex P Reiner, Brendan J Keating, Frank Dudbridge, Juan P Casas, .
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2014
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To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease.
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Peak flow rate and death due to coronary heart disease: 30-year results from the Northwick Park Heart cohort study.
Open Heart
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Numerous studies have reported that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or impaired lung function are associated with later coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear if lung function is an independent risk factor, as many of these studies have included only limited measures of other factors associated with CHD.
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Recent respiratory infection and risk of venous thromboembolism: case-control study through a general practice database.
Int J Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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The association between respiratory infection and risk of heart attacks and strokes is well established. However, less evidence exists for an association between respiratory infection and venous thromboembolism (VTE). In this article, we describe the associations between respiratory infection and VTE.
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Effect of daily aspirin on long-term risk of death due to cancer: analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2010
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Treatment with daily aspirin for 5 years or longer reduces subsequent risk of colorectal cancer. Several lines of evidence suggest that aspirin might also reduce risk of other cancers, particularly of the gastrointestinal tract, but proof in man is lacking. We studied deaths due to cancer during and after randomised trials of daily aspirin versus control done originally for prevention of vascular events.
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Long-term effect of aspirin on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality: 20-year follow-up of five randomised trials.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2010
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High-dose aspirin (?500 mg daily) reduces long-term incidence of colorectal cancer, but adverse effects might limit its potential for long-term prevention. The long-term effectiveness of lower doses (75-300 mg daily) is unknown. We assessed the effects of aspirin on incidence and mortality due to colorectal cancer in relation to dose, duration of treatment, and site of tumour.
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Review: Plasma renin and the incidence of cardiovascular disease.
J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2010
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Whether renin is involved in the onset of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear. A case-control study in 1972, suggesting a causal association between renin and CHD, has now been followed by three prospective studies. One was based on 1,717 hypertensive subjects in a Work-Site Program in New York. The main results showed an increased risk of CHD the higher the renin level. A second study in occupational groups in North West London, UK, recruited 803 white men not selected according to blood pressure, and found no association. A possible exception was in the minority of those with similar blood pressure levels to participants in the Work-Site Program, in whom the incidence of CHD was higher according to the renin level, but not significantly so. The third study was in Framingham Offspring and included 3,532 participants also not selected according to blood pressure. As in the UK study, there was no clear association between renin and risk of CHD in all participants, or in this study in those with raised blood pressure. The authors considered their results consistent with those of the UK study in finding "no association of renin with overall risk of CHD". Besides the three epidemiological studies, dealing explicitly with renin, other studies in which it has been one of several variables considered have also not found convincing evidence of its involvement in CHD. There is, therefore, little support for the hypothesis that high renin levels increase the risk of CHD, with the possible but uncertain exception of those with raised blood pressure.
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Circulating levels of coagulation and inflammation markers and cancer risks: individual participant analysis of data from three long-term cohorts.
Int J Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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Basic and clinical research support the hypothesis that activation of the coagulation and inflammation pathways may affect cancer onset, but there is limited epidemiological data to support this.
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Long-term association of routine blood count (Coulter) variables on fatal coronary heart disease: 30-year results from the first prospective Northwick Park Heart Study (NPHS-I).
Int J Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2009
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Since evidence of a long-term association between routine blood count (Coulter) variables and coronary heart disease (CHD) is inconsistent, the authors analysed white blood cell count (WBC), red blood cell count (RBC), haemoglobin (Hgb), packed cell volume (PCV) and platelet count for their long-term associations with CHD mortality in the first Northwick Park Heart Study (NPHS-I). NPHS-I has follow-up information for >30 years on 2167 White men and 941 White women and holds entry and follow-up data on haematological variables and other known CHD risk factors.
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Aspirin in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular disease: collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised trials.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2009
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Low-dose aspirin is of definite and substantial net benefit for many people who already have occlusive vascular disease. We have assessed the benefits and risks in primary prevention.
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C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and cardiovascular disease prediction.
N. Engl. J. Med.
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There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events.
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Primary prevention of ischaemic cardiovascular disorders with antiplatelet agents.
Handb Exp Pharmacol
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In those who have already survived myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke, or have had a transient ischaemic episode (TIA), daily low dose aspirin (ASA) reduces the risk of recurrences by an amount that greatly exceeds the risk of serious bleeding (secondary prevention). ASA is therefore recommended for these people. However, in primary prevention-reducing risk in those so far free of clinically manifest episodes-the benefit is of the same order as the bleeding hazard, (which is much the same in both primary and secondary prevention contexts). The use of other effective agents such as statins further emphasises the even balance between benefit and hazard in primary prevention. Six primary prevention trials are reviewed, first singly and then in a meta-analysis based on individual patient data. ASA reduced non-fatal myocardial infarction by about 25%. However, death from coronary heart disease (CHD) was not significantly reduced (by 5%), nor was any vascular death (3%). There was a non- significant reduction in strokes of 5%, this being the net result of an 8% reduction in non-fatal stroke and a 21% increase in stroke death (mainly from haemorrhagic events), both effects being non-significant. Serious vascular events (MI, stroke or vascular death) were significantly reduced by 12%, mainly due to the large effect on non-fatal MI. About 1650 people would need to be treated with ASA for a year to avoid one serious vascular event, which contrasts with the 10-20 events avoided in secondary prevention by treating 1,000 patients for a year. Other primary prevention trials not included in the meta-analysis have also reported no benefits in MI or stroke, but the findings of still unpublished trials are awaited. Recently, however, encouraging results have come from meta-analyses of the effects of ASA on cancer incidence and mortality and on its effects on cancer metastasis, particularly for adenocarcinomas. Typically, reductions in these measures have been around 30% following treatment for four or five years, but more in several instances. These results alter the balance in primary prevention between benefit and hazard as it appears for arterial events alone, tipping it towards the use of ASA. Consequently, new guidelines on advice and decisions on ASA in primary prevention are now needed. Low dose ASA, eg. 75 mg daily is as effective as higher doses for all the vascular and cancer benefits established in the meta-analyses, and it causes less serious bleeding than higher doses.
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Effect of daily aspirin on risk of cancer metastasis: a study of incident cancers during randomised controlled trials.
Lancet
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Daily aspirin reduces the long-term incidence of some adenocarcinomas, but effects on mortality due to some cancers appear after only a few years, suggesting that it might also reduce growth or metastasis. We established the frequency of distant metastasis in patients who developed cancer during trials of daily aspirin versus control.
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Short-term effects of daily aspirin on cancer incidence, mortality, and non-vascular death: analysis of the time course of risks and benefits in 51 randomised controlled trials.
Lancet
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Daily aspirin reduces the long-term risk of death due to cancer. However, the short-term effect is less certain, especially in women, effects on cancer incidence are largely unknown, and the time course of risk and benefit in primary prevention is unclear. We studied cancer deaths in all trials of daily aspirin versus control and the time course of effects of low-dose aspirin on cancer incidence and other outcomes in trials in primary prevention.
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Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease: a collaborative meta-analysis of 82 studies.
, Nadeem Sarwar, Adam S Butterworth, Daniel F Freitag, John Gregson, Peter Willeit, Donal N Gorman, Pei Gao, Danish Saleheen, Augusto Rendon, Christopher P Nelson, Peter S Braund, Alistair S Hall, Daniel I Chasman, Anne Tybjærg-Hansen, John C Chambers, Emelia J Benjamin, Paul W Franks, Robert Clarke, Arthur A M Wilde, Mieke D Trip, Maristella Steri, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Lu Qi, C Ellen van der Schoot, Ulf de Faire, Jeanette Erdmann, Heather M Stringham, Wolfgang Koenig, Daniel J Rader, David Melzer, David Reich, Bruce M Psaty, Marcus E Kleber, Demosthenes B Panagiotakos, Johann Willeit, Patrik Wennberg, Mark Woodward, Svetlana Adamovic, Eric B Rimm, Tom W Meade, Richard F Gillum, Jonathan A Shaffer, Albert Hofman, Altan Onat, Johan Sundström, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Dan Mellström, John Gallacher, Mary Cushman, Russell P Tracy, Jussi Kauhanen, Magnus Karlsson, Jukka T Salonen, Lars Wilhelmsen, Philippe Amouyel, Bernard Cantin, Lyle G Best, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, JoAnn E Manson, George Davey-Smith, Paul I W de Bakker, Christopher J O'Donnell, James F Wilson, Anthony G Wilson, Themistocles L Assimes, John-Olov Jansson, Claes Ohlsson, Asa Tivesten, Osten Ljunggren, Muredach P Reilly, Anders Hamsten, Erik Ingelsson, Francois Cambien, Joseph Hung, G Neil Thomas, Michael Boehnke, Heribert Schunkert, Folkert W Asselbergs, John J P Kastelein, Vilmundur Gudnason, Veikko Salomaa, Tamara B Harris, Jaspal S Kooner, Kristine H Allin, Børge G Nordestgaard, Jemma C Hopewell, Alison H Goodall, Paul M Ridker, Hilma Holm, Hugh Watkins, Willem H Ouwehand, Nilesh J Samani, Stephen Kaptoge, Emanuele Di Angelantonio, Olivier Harari, John Danesh.
Lancet
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Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied a functional genetic variant known to affect IL6R signalling.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.