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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Small-world network properties in prefrontal cortex correlate with predictors of psychopathology risk in young children: A NIRS study.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive, portable, and particularly well suited for collecting data in ecological settings. Therefore, it holds promise as a potential neurodiagnostic for young children. We set out to explore whether NIRS could be utilized in assessing the risk of developmental psychopathology in young children. A growing body of work indicates that temperament at young age is associated with vulnerability to psychopathology later on in life. In particular, it has been shown that low effortful control (EC), which includes the focusing and shifting of attention, inhibitory control, perceptual sensitivity, and a low threshold for pleasure, is linked to conditions such as anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Physiologically, EC has been linked to a control network spanning among other sites the prefrontal cortex. Several psychopathologies, such as depression and ADHD, have been shown to result in compromised small-world network properties. Therefore we set out to explore the relationship between EC and the small-world properties of PFC using NIRS. NIRS data were collected from 44 toddlers, ages 3-5, while watching naturalistic stimuli (movie clips). Derived complex network measures were then correlated to EC as derived from the Childrens Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ). We found that reduced levels of EC were associated with compromised small-world properties of the prefrontal network. Our results suggest that the longitudinal NIRS studies of complex network properties in young children hold promise in furthering our understanding of developmental psychopathology.
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Combining classification with fMRI-derived complex network measures for potential neurodiagnostics.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Complex network analysis (CNA), a subset of graph theory, is an emerging approach to the analysis of functional connectivity in the brain, allowing quantitative assessment of network properties such as functional segregation, integration, resilience, and centrality. Here, we show how a classification framework complements complex network analysis by providing an efficient and objective means of selecting the best network model characterizing given functional connectivity data. We describe a novel kernel-sum learning approach, block diagonal optimization (BDopt), which can be applied to CNA features to single out graph-theoretic characteristics and/or anatomical regions of interest underlying discrimination, while mitigating problems of multiple comparisons. As a proof of concept for the methods applicability to future neurodiagnostics, we apply BDopt classification to two resting state fMRI data sets: a trait (between-subjects) classification of patients with schizophrenia vs. controls, and a state (within-subjects) classification of wake vs. sleep, demonstrating powerful discriminant accuracy for the proposed framework.
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Optimizing complexity measures for FMRI data: algorithm, artifact, and sensitivity.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Complexity in the brain has been well-documented at both neuronal and hemodynamic scales, with increasing evidence supporting its use in sensitively differentiating between mental states and disorders. However, application of complexity measures to fMRI time-series, which are short, sparse, and have low signal/noise, requires careful modality-specific optimization.
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The NIRS Analysis Package: noise reduction and statistical inference.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique that can be used to measure cortical hemodynamic responses to specific stimuli or tasks. While analyses of NIRS data are normally adapted from established fMRI techniques, there are nevertheless substantial differences between the two modalities. Here, we investigate the impact of NIRS-specific noise; e.g., systemic (physiological), motion-related artifacts, and serial autocorrelations, upon the validity of statistical inference within the framework of the general linear model. We present a comprehensive framework for noise reduction and statistical inference, which is custom-tailored to the noise characteristics of NIRS. These methods have been implemented in a public domain Matlab toolbox, the NIRS Analysis Package (NAP). Finally, we validate NAP using both simulated and actual data, showing marked improvement in the detection power and reliability of NIRS.
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Towards a computational theory of experience.
Conscious Cogn
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2011
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A standing challenge for the science of mind is to account for the datum that every mind faces in the most immediate--that is, unmediated--fashion: its phenomenal experience. The complementary tasks of explaining what it means for a system to give rise to experience and what constitutes the content of experience (qualia) in computational terms are particularly challenging, given the multiple realizability of computation. In this paper, we identify a set of conditions that a computational theory must satisfy for it to constitute not just a sufficient but a necessary, and therefore naturalistic and intrinsic, explanation of qualia. We show that a common assumption behind many neurocomputational theories of the mind, according to which mind states can be formalized solely in terms of instantaneous vectors of activities of representational units such as neurons, does not meet the requisite conditions, in part because it relies on inactive units to shape presently experienced qualia and implies a homogeneous representation space, which is devoid of intrinsic structure. We then sketch a naturalistic computational theory of qualia, which posits that experience is realized by dynamical activity-space trajectories (rather than points) and that its richness is measured by the representational capacity of the trajectory space in which it unfolds.
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A stand-alone method for anatomical localization of NIRS measurements.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive cortical imaging technique that provides many of the advantages of cortical fMRI with additional benefits of low cost, portability, and increased temporal resolution-features that make it potentially ideal for clinical diagnostic applications. However, the usefulness of NIRS is contingent on the ability to reliably localize the measured signal cortically. Although this can be achieved by supplementing NIRS data collection with an MRI scan, a much more appealing alternative is to use a portable magnetic measuring system to record the locations of optodes. Previous work has shown that optode skull measurements can be projected to the brain consistently within reasonable error bounds. Yet, as we show, if this is done without explicitly modeling the geometry of the holder securing the NIR optodes to participants heads, considerable bias in the projection loci results. Here, we describe an algorithm that not only overcomes this bias but also corrects for measurement error in both optode position and skull reference points (which are used to register the measurements to standard brain templates) by applying geometric constraints. This method has been implemented as part of our NIRS Analysis Package (NAP), a public domain Matlab toolbox for analysis of NIRS data.
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Removal of spatial biological artifacts in functional maps by local similarity minimization.
J. Neurosci. Methods
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2009
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Functional maps obtained by various technologies, including optical imaging techniques, f-MRI, PET, and others, may be contaminated with biological artifacts such as vascular patterns or large patches of parenchyma. These artifacts originate mostly from changes in the microcirculation that result from either activity-dependent changes in volume or from oximetric changes that do not co-localize with neuronal activity per se. Standard methods do not always suffice to reduce such artifacts, in which case conspicuous spatial artifacts mask details of the underlying activity patterns. Here we propose a simple algorithm that efficiently removes spatial biological artifacts contaminating high-resolution functional maps. We validated this procedure by applying it to cortical maps resulting from optical imaging, based either on voltage-sensitive dye signals or on intrinsic signals. To remove vascular spatial patterns we first constructed a template of typical artifacts (vascular/cardiac pulsation/vasomotion), using principle components derived from baseline information obtained in the absence of stimulation. Next, we modified this template by means of local similarity minimization (LSM), achieved by measuring neighborhood similarity between contaminated data and the artifact template and then abolishing the similarity. LSM thus removed spatial patterns originating from the cortical vasculature components, including large fields of capillary parenchyma, helping to unveil details of neuronal activity patterns that were otherwise masked by these vascular artifacts. Examples obtained from our imaging experiments with anaesthetized cats and behaving monkeys showed that the LSM method is both general and reproducible, and is often superior to other available procedures.
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Arousal increases the representational capacity of cortical tissue.
J Comput Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2009
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Arousal patently transforms the faculties of complex organisms. Although typical changes in cortical activity such as seen in EEG and LFP measurements are associated with change in state of arousal, it remains unclear what in the constitution of such state dependent activity enables this profound enhancement of ability. We put forward the hypothesis that arousal modulates cortical activity by rendering it more fit to represent information. We argue that representational capacity is of a dual nature-it requires not only that cortical tissue generate complex activity (i.e. spatiotemporal neuronal events), but also a complex cortical activity space (which is comprised of such spatiotemporal events). We explain that the topological notion of complexity-homology-is the pertinent measure of the complexity of neuronal activity spaces, as homological structure indicates not only the degree to which underlying activity is inherently clustered but also registers the effective dimensionality of the configurations formed by such clusters. Changes of this sort in the structure of cortical activity spaces can serve as the basis of the enhanced capacity to make perceptual/behavioral distinctions brought about by arousal. To show the feasibility of these ideas, we analyzed voltage sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) data acquired from primate visual cortex in disparate states of arousal. Our results lend some support to the theory: first as arousal increased so did the complexity of activity (that is the complexity of VSDI movies). Moreover, the complexity of structure of activity space (that is VSDI movie space) as measured by persistent homology-a multi scale topological measure of complexity-increased with arousal as well.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.