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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Revision of the cricket genus Cardiodactylus (Orthoptera, Eneopterinae, Lebinthini): the species from both sides of the Wallace line, with description of 25 new species.
Zootaxa
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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The genus Cardiodactylus is the most speciose and widely distributed genus of the cricket subfamily Eneopterinae and of the Lebinthini tribe. Along with diverse acoustic features, this genus is also characterized by a wide distribution area running from Japan to Southeast Asia, Northern Australia and in many archipelagos in the Western Pacific, with a high contrast in species distributions. In this paper we start revising Cardiodactylus by focusing on the western region of its wide distribution and the Novaeguineae species group. We describe 25 new species of Cardiodactylus, redescribe 3 species and bring new signalizations for 5 species. Whenever possible, information is provided about species distribution, male calling song and male and female genitalia, forewing venation and habitat. 
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A new species of Cardiodactylus (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Eneopterinae) from Singapore.
Zootaxa
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
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Cardiodactylus is a speciose cricket genus belonging to the subfamily Eneopterinae. One new species of Cardiodactylus from Singapore is described: Cardiodactylus admirabilis Tan & Robillard n. sp. Acoustic analysis is also performed on the male calling song. A key to species of Eneopterinae from Singapore is provided.
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Mechanisms of high-frequency song generation in brachypterous crickets and the role of ghost frequencies.
J. Exp. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Sound production in crickets relies on stridulation, the well-understood rubbing together of a pair of specialised wings. As the file of one wing slides over the scraper of the other, a series of rhythmic impacts causes harmonic oscillations, usually resulting in the radiation of pure tones delivered at low frequencies (2-8 kHz). In the short-winged crickets of the Lebinthini tribe, acoustic communication relies on signals with remarkably high frequencies (>8 kHz) and rich harmonic content. Using several species of the subfamily Eneopterinae, we characterised the morphological and mechanical specialisations supporting the production of high frequencies, and demonstrated that higher harmonics are exploited as dominant frequencies. These specialisations affect the structure of the stridulatory file, the motor control of stridulation and the resonance of the sound radiator. We placed these specialisations in a phylogenetic framework and show that they serve to exploit high-frequency vibrational modes pre-existing in the phylogenetic ancestor. In Eneopterinae, the lower frequency components are harmonically related to the dominant peak, suggesting they are relicts of ancestral carrier frequencies. Yet, such ghost frequencies still occur in the wings free resonances, highlighting the fundamental mechanical constraints of sound radiation. These results support the hypothesis that such high-frequency songs evolved stepwise, by a form of punctuated evolution that could be related to functional constraints, rather than by only the progressive increase of the ancestral fundamental frequency.
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Climate and soil type together explain the distribution of microendemic species in a biodiversity hotspot.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The grasshopper genus Caledonula, endemic to New Caledonia, was studied to understand the evolution of species distributions in relation to climate and soil types. Based on a comprehensive sampling of 80 locations throughout the island, the genus was represented by five species, four of which are new to science, of which three are described here. All the species have limited distributions in New Caledonia. Bioclimatic niche modelling shows that all the species were found in association with a wet climate and reduced seasonality, explaining their restriction to the southern half of the island. The results suggest that the genus was ancestrally constrained by seasonality. A molecular phylogeny was reconstructed using two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers. The partially resolved tree showed monophyly of the species found on metalliferous soils, and molecular dating indicated a rather recent origin for the genus. Adaptation to metalliferous soils is suggested by both morphological changes and radiation on these soils. The genus Caledonula is therefore a good model to understand the origin of microendemism in the context of recent and mixed influences of climate and soil type.
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The complex stridulatory behavior of the cricket Eneoptera guyanensis Chopard (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Eneopterinae).
J. Insect Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Crickets produce stridulated sounds by rubbing their forewings together. The calling song of the cricket species Eneoptera guyanensis Chopard, 1931 alternates two song sections, at low and high dominant frequencies, corresponding to two distinct sections of the stridulatory file. In the present study we address the complex acoustic behavior of E. guyanensis by integrating information on the peculiar morphology of the stridulatory file, the acoustic analysis of its calling song and the forewing movements during sound production. The results show that even if E. guyanensis matches the normal cricket functioning for syllable production, the stridulation involves two different closing movements, corresponding to two types of syllables, allowing the plectrum to hit alternately each differentiated section of the file. Transition syllables combine high and low frequencies and are emitted by a complete forewing closure over the whole file. The double-teeth section of the stridulatory file may be used as a multiplier for the song frequency because of the morphological multiplication due to the double teeth, but also because of an increase of wing velocity when this file section is used. According to available phylogenetic and acoustic data, this complex stridulation may have evolved in a two-step process.
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Redescription of two Cardiodactylus species (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Eneopterinae): the supposedly well-known C. novaeguineae (Haan, 1842), and the semi-forgotten C. guttulus ( Matsumura, 1913 ) from Japan.
Zool. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2009
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In the present study, we redescribe and compare Cardiodactylus novaeguineae (Haan, 1842) and Cardiodactylus guttulus (Matsumura, 1913 ), completing previous descriptions and adding many information on morphology, including both male and female genitalia and forewing venation, distribution, habitat, behavior, calling, and courtship songs. A neotype series is selected for C. novaeguineae and deposited in RMNH, Leiden MNHN, Paris, AMNH, New York and SAMA, Adelaide. The male of C. guttulus is described, and the species C. boharti Otte, 2007 , is synonymised under C. guttulus.
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Secondary sympatry caused by range expansion informs on the dynamics of microendemism in a biodiversity hotspot.
PLoS ONE
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Islands are bounded areas where high endemism is explained either by allopatric speciation through the fragmentation of the limited amount of space available, or by sympatric speciation and accumulation of daughter species. Most empirical evidence point out the dominant action of allopatric speciation. We evaluate this general view by looking at a case study where sympatric speciation is suspected. We analyse the mode, tempo and geography of speciation in Agnotecous, a cricket genus endemic to New Caledonia showing a generalized pattern of sympatry between species making sympatric speciation plausible. We obtained five mitochondrial and five nuclear markers (6.8 kb) from 37 taxa corresponding to 17 of the 21 known extant species of Agnotecous, and including several localities per species, and we conducted phylogenetic and dating analyses. Our results suggest that the diversification of Agnotecous occurred mostly through allopatric speciation in the last 10 Myr. Highly microendemic species are the most recent ones (<2 Myr) and current sympatry is due to secondary range expansion after allopatric speciation. Species distribution should then be viewed as a highly dynamic process and extreme microendemism only as a temporary situation. We discuss these results considering the influence of climatic changes combined with intricate soil diversity and mountain topography. A complex interplay between these factors could have permitted repeated speciation events and range expansion.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.