JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Elevated chronic inflammatory factors and myeloid-derived suppressor cells indicate poor prognosis in advanced melanoma patients.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the hallmarks for tumor initiation and progression. Moreover, a long-term production and accumulation of inflammatory factors lead to a local and systemic immunosuppression associated with cancer progression. However, the correlation between inflammatory mediators, immunosuppressive cells and the clinical outcome of malignant melanoma patients was poorly investigated. In this study, we performed a complex analysis of various inflammatory factors, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the peripheral blood of patients suffering from malignant melanoma of different stages. We demonstrated that levels of serum IL-1?, IFN-? and CXCL10 were significantly increased in advanced melanoma patients. In addition, these factors were found to be associated with an increased frequency of MDSCs and Tregs as compared to age- and gender-matched healthy donors. Importantly, advanced melanoma patients with signs of progression displayed markedly elevated concentrations of IL-1? and CXCL10 as compared to patients with stable disease. Moreover, an enrichment of circulating monocytic (Mo)-MDSCs significantly correlated with a decreased progression free survival of these patients. Our data highlight a complex association between circulating inflammatory mediators, Mo-MDSCs and the clinical outcome as well as suggest that their levels in patients with advanced melanoma are of important prognostic value allowing the identification of those with high risk of disease progression.
Related JoVE Video
Effect on the tensile strength of human acellular dermis (Epiflex®) of in-vitro incubation simulating an open abdomen setting.
BMC Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The use of human acellular dermis (hAD) to close open abdomen in the treatment process of severe peritonitis might be an alternative to standard care. This paper describes an investigation of the effects of fluids simulating an open abdomen environment on the biomechanical properties of Epiflex® a cell-free human dermis transplant.
Related JoVE Video
Development of Anti-G, Anti-C and Anti-Jk(b) in a 22-Year-Old Mother during Her Fourth Pregnancy.
Transfus Med Hemother
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Anti-G antibodies are rarely found since anti-D, in combination with anti-C, are difficult to discriminate from anti-G antibodies in routine testing.
Related JoVE Video
Centrosome aberrations in bone marrow cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes correlate with chromosomal instability.
Ann. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Centrosomes play important roles in the maintenance of genetic stability and centrosomal aberrations are a hallmark of cancer. Deregulation of centriole duplication leads to supernumerary centrosomes, sister chromatid missegregation and could result in chromosomal instability (CIN) and aneuploidy. CIN is a common feature in at least 45% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Therefore, we sought to investigate the centrosomal status and its role for development of CIN in bone marrow (BM) cells of MDS patients. BM cells of 34 MDS patients were examined cytogenetically. Furthermore, cells were immunostained with a centrosome-specific antibody to pericentrin to analyze the centrosomal status. Umbilical cord blood specimens and BM cells of healthy persons (n = 11 and n = 4) served as controls. In addition, the protein expression of the protease separase responsible for genetic stability was examined by western blot analysis. Centrosome abnormalities were detected in 10% (range, 4-17%) of cells of MDS samples, but in only 2% (range, 0-4%) of cells of healthy controls. Normal karyotypes were found in control cells and in BM cells of 16/34 MDS patients. The incidence of centrosomal alterations was higher in BM cells of patients with cytogenetic alterations (mean, 12%) compared to BM cells of patients without cytogenetic changes (mean, 7%). Our results indicate that centrosome alterations are a common and early detectable feature in MDS patients and may contribute to the acquisition of chromosomal aberrations. We assume that centrosome defects could be involved in disease progression and may serve as a future prognostic marker.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.