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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
CicArMiSatDB: the chickpea microsatellite database.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2014
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Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is a widely grown legume crop in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate regions. Molecular breeding approaches seem to be essential for enhancing crop productivity in chickpea. Until recently, limited numbers of molecular markers were available in the case of chickpea for use in molecular breeding. However, the recent advances in genomics facilitated the development of large scale markers especially SSRs (simple sequence repeats), the markers of choice in any breeding program. Availability of genome sequence very recently opens new avenues for accelerating molecular breeding approaches for chickpea improvement.
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An integrated SNP mining and utilization (ISMU) pipeline for next generation sequencing data.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Open source single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery pipelines for next generation sequencing data commonly requires working knowledge of command line interface, massive computational resources and expertise which is a daunting task for biologists. Further, the SNP information generated may not be readily used for downstream processes such as genotyping. Hence, a comprehensive pipeline has been developed by integrating several open source next generation sequencing (NGS) tools along with a graphical user interface called Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) for SNP discovery and their utilization by developing genotyping assays. The pipeline features functionalities such as pre-processing of raw data, integration of open source alignment tools (Bowtie2, BWA, Maq, NovoAlign and SOAP2), SNP prediction (SAMtools/SOAPsnp/CNS2snp and CbCC) methods and interfaces for developing genotyping assays. The pipeline outputs a list of high quality SNPs between all pairwise combinations of genotypes analyzed, in addition to the reference genome/sequence. Visualization tools (Tablet and Flapjack) integrated into the pipeline enable inspection of the alignment and errors, if any. The pipeline also provides a confidence score or polymorphism information content value with flanking sequences for identified SNPs in standard format required for developing marker genotyping (KASP and Golden Gate) assays. The pipeline enables users to process a range of NGS datasets such as whole genome re-sequencing, restriction site associated DNA sequencing and transcriptome sequencing data at a fast speed. The pipeline is very useful for plant genetics and breeding community with no computational expertise in order to discover SNPs and utilize in genomics, genetics and breeding studies. The pipeline has been parallelized to process huge datasets of next generation sequencing. It has been developed in Java language and is available at http://hpc.icrisat.cgiar.org/ISMU as a standalone free software.
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Unraveling the genetic architecture of subtropical maize (Zea mays L.) lines to assess their utility in breeding programs.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2013
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Maize is an increasingly important food crop in southeast Asia. The elucidation of its genetic architecture, accomplished by exploring quantitative trait loci and useful alleles in various lines across numerous breeding programs, is therefore of great interest. The present study aimed to characterize subtropical maize lines using high-quality SNPs distributed throughout the genome.
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Cytoplasmic male sterility-associated chimeric open reading frames identified by mitochondrial genome sequencing of four Cajanus genotypes.
DNA Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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The hybrid pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) breeding technology based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is currently unique among legumes and displays major potential for yield increase. CMS is defined as a condition in which a plant is unable to produce functional pollen grains. The novel chimeric open reading frames (ORFs) produced as a results of mitochondrial genome rearrangements are considered to be the main cause of CMS. To identify these CMS-related ORFs in pigeonpea, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of three C. cajan lines (the male-sterile line ICPA 2039, the maintainer line ICPB 2039, and the hybrid line ICPH 2433) and of the wild relative (Cajanus cajanifolius ICPW 29). A single, circular-mapping molecule of length 545.7 kb was assembled and annotated for the ICPA 2039 line. Sequence annotation predicted 51 genes, including 34 protein-coding and 17 RNA genes. Comparison of the mitochondrial genomes from different Cajanus genotypes identified 31 ORFs, which differ between lines within which CMS is present or absent. Among these chimeric ORFs, 13 were identified by comparison of the related male-sterile and maintainer lines. These ORFs display features that are known to trigger CMS in other plant species and to represent the most promising candidates for CMS-related mitochondrial rearrangements in pigeonpea.
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Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] consensus linkage map constructed using four RIL mapping populations and newly developed EST-SSRs.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] is a widely cultivated drought- and high-temperature tolerant C4 cereal grown under dryland, rainfed and irrigated conditions in drought-prone regions of the tropics and sub-tropics of Africa, South Asia and the Americas. It is considered an orphan crop with relatively few genomic and genetic resources. This study was undertaken to increase the EST-based microsatellite marker and genetic resources for this crop to facilitate marker-assisted breeding.
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Comparison of SSRs and SNPs in assessment of genetic relatedness in maize.
Genetica
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2011
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Advances in high-throughput SNP genotyping and genome sequencing technologies have enabled genome-wide association mapping in dissecting the genetic basis of complex quantitative traits. In this study, 82 SSRs and 884 SNPs with minor allele frequencies (MAF) over 0.20 were used to compare their ability to assess population structure, principal component analysis (PCA) and relative kinship in a maize association panel consisting of 154 inbred lines. Compared to SNPs, SSRs provided more information on genetic diversity. The expected heterozygosity (He) of SSRs and SNPs averaged 0.65 and 0.44, and the polymorphic information content of these two markers was 0.61 and 0.34 in this panel, respectively. Additionally, SSRs performed better at clustering all lines into groups using STRUCTURE and PCA approaches, and estimating relative kinship. For both marker systems, the same clusters were observed based on PCA and the first two eigenvectors accounted for similar percentage of genetic variations in this panel. The correlation coefficients of each eigenvector from SSRs and SNPs decreased sharply when the eigenvector varied from 1 to 3, but kept around 0 when the eigenvector were over 3. The kinship estimates based on SSRs and SNPs were moderately correlated (r (2) = 0.69). All these results suggest that SSR markers with moderate density are more informative than SNPs for assessing genetic relatedness in maize association mapping panels.
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Draft genome sequence of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan), an orphan legume crop of resource-poor farmers.
Nat. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2011
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Pigeonpea is an important legume food crop grown primarily by smallholder farmers in many semi-arid tropical regions of the world. We used the Illumina next-generation sequencing platform to generate 237.2 Gb of sequence, which along with Sanger-based bacterial artificial chromosome end sequences and a genetic map, we assembled into scaffolds representing 72.7% (605.78 Mb) of the 833.07 Mb pigeonpea genome. Genome analysis predicted 48,680 genes for pigeonpea and also showed the potential role that certain gene families, for example, drought tolerance-related genes, have played throughout the domestication of pigeonpea and the evolution of its ancestors. Although we found a few segmental duplication events, we did not observe the recent genome-wide duplication events observed in soybean. This reference genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of agronomically important traits, and accelerate the development of improved pigeonpea varieties that could improve food security in many developing countries.
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Novel SSR markers from BAC-end sequences, DArT arrays and a comprehensive genetic map with 1,291 marker loci for chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2011
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Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important cool season food legume, cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The goal of this study was to develop novel molecular markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences (BESs) and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers, and to construct a high-density genetic map based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) population ICC 4958 (C. arietinum)×PI 489777 (C. reticulatum). A BAC-library comprising 55,680 clones was constructed and 46,270 BESs were generated. Mining of these BESs provided 6,845 SSRs, and primer pairs were designed for 1,344 SSRs. In parallel, DArT arrays with ca. 15,000 clones were developed, and 5,397 clones were found polymorphic among 94 genotypes tested. Screening of newly developed BES-SSR markers and DArT arrays on the parental genotypes of the RIL mapping population showed polymorphism with 253 BES-SSR markers and 675 DArT markers. Segregation data obtained for these polymorphic markers and 494 markers data compiled from published reports or collaborators were used for constructing the genetic map. As a result, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 1,291 markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total of 845.56 cM distance was developed (http://cmap.icrisat.ac.in/cmap/sm/cp/thudi/). The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 68 (LG 8) to 218 (LG 3) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.65 cM. While the developed resource of molecular markers will be useful for genetic diversity, genetic mapping and molecular breeding applications, the comprehensive genetic map with integrated BES-SSR markers will facilitate its anchoring to the physical map (under construction) to accelerate map-based cloning of genes in chickpea and comparative genome evolution studies in legumes.
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Large-scale transcriptome analysis in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), an orphan legume crop of the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important legume crop in the semi-arid regions of Asia and Africa. Gains in crop productivity have been low however, particularly because of biotic and abiotic stresses. To help enhance crop productivity using molecular breeding techniques, next generation sequencing technologies such as Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa were used to determine the sequence of most gene transcripts and to identify drought-responsive genes and gene-based molecular markers. A total of 103,215 tentative unique sequences (TUSs) have been produced from 435,018 Roche/454 reads and 21,491 Sanger expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Putative functions were determined for 49,437 (47.8%) of the TUSs, and gene ontology assignments were determined for 20,634 (41.7%) of the TUSs. Comparison of the chickpea TUSs with the Medicago truncatula genome assembly (Mt 3.5.1 build) resulted in 42,141 aligned TUSs with putative gene structures (including 39,281 predicted intron/splice junctions). Alignment of ?37 million Illumina/Solexa tags generated from drought-challenged root tissues of two chickpea genotypes against the TUSs identified 44,639 differentially expressed TUSs. The TUSs were also used to identify a diverse set of markers, including 728 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 495 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 387 conserved orthologous sequence (COS) markers, and 2088 intron-spanning region (ISR) markers. This resource will be useful for basic and applied research for genome analysis and crop improvement in chickpea.
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Defining the transcriptome assembly and its use for genome dynamics and transcriptome profiling studies in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.).
DNA Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
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This study reports generation of large-scale genomic resources for pigeonpea, a so-called orphan crop species of the semi-arid tropic regions. FLX/454 sequencing carried out on a normalized cDNA pool prepared from 31 tissues produced 494 353 short transcript reads (STRs). Cluster analysis of these STRs, together with 10 817 Sanger ESTs, resulted in a pigeonpea trancriptome assembly (CcTA) comprising of 127 754 tentative unique sequences (TUSs). Functional analysis of these TUSs highlights several active pathways and processes in the sampled tissues. Comparison of the CcTA with the soybean genome showed similarity to 10 857 and 16 367 soybean gene models (depending on alignment methods). Additionally, Illumina 1G sequencing was performed on Fusarium wilt (FW)- and sterility mosaic disease (SMD)-challenged root tissues of 10 resistant and susceptible genotypes. More than 160 million sequence tags were used to identify FW- and SMD-responsive genes. Sequence analysis of CcTA and the Illumina tags identified a large new set of markers for use in genetics and breeding, including 8137 simple sequence repeats, 12 141 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 5845 intron-spanning regions. Genomic resources developed in this study should be useful for basic and applied research, not only for pigeonpea improvement but also for other related, agronomically important legumes.
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Development and use of genic molecular markers (GMMs) for construction of a transcript map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).
Theor. Appl. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2011
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A transcript map has been constructed by the development and integration of genic molecular markers (GMMs) including single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), genic microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) and intron spanning region (ISR)-based markers, on an inter-specific mapping population of chickpea, the third food legume crop of the world and the first food legume crop of India. For SNP discovery through allele re-sequencing, primer pairs were designed for 688 genes/expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of chickpea and 657 genes/ESTs of closely related species of chickpea. High-quality sequence data obtained for 220 candidate genic regions on 2-20 genotypes representing 9 Cicer species provided 1,893 SNPs with an average frequency of 1/35.83 bp and 0.34 PIC (polymorphism information content) value. On an average 2.9 haplotypes were present in 220 candidate genic regions with an average haplotype diversity of 0.6326. SNP2CAPS analysis of 220 sequence alignments, as mentioned above, provided a total of 192 CAPS candidates. Experimental analysis of these 192 CAPS candidates together with 87 CAPS candidates identified earlier through in silico mining of ESTs provided scorable amplification in 173 (62.01%) cases of which predicted assays were validated in 143 (82.66%) cases (CGMM). Alignments of chickpea unigenes with Medicago truncatula genome were used to develop 121 intron spanning region (CISR) markers of which 87 yielded scorable products. In addition, optimization of 77 EST-derived SSR (ICCeM) markers provided 51 scorable markers. Screening of easily assayable 281 markers including 143 CGMMs, 87 CISRs and 51 ICCeMs on 5 parental genotypes of three mapping populations identified 104 polymorphic markers including 90 markers on the inter-specific mapping population. Sixty-two of these GMMs together with 218 earlier published markers (including 64 GMM loci) and 20 other unpublished markers could be integrated into this genetic map. A genetic map developed here, therefore, has a total of 300 loci including 126 GMM loci and spans 766.56 cM, with an average inter-marker distance of 2.55 cM. In summary, this is the first report on the development of large-scale genic markers including development of easily assayable markers and a transcript map of chickpea. These resources should be useful not only for genome analysis and genetics and breeding applications of chickpea, but also for comparative legume genomics.
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Comparative SNP and haplotype analysis reveals a higher genetic diversity and rapider LD decay in tropical than temperate germplasm in maize.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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Understanding of genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay in diverse maize germplasm is fundamentally important for maize improvement. A total of 287 tropical and 160 temperate inbred lines were genotyped with 1943 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers of high quality and compared for genetic diversity and LD decay using the SNPs and their haplotypes developed from genic and intergenic regions. Intronic SNPs revealed a substantial higher variation than exonic SNPs. The big window size haplotypes (3-SNP slide-window covering 2160 kb on average) revealed much higher genetic diversity than the 10 kb-window and gene-window haplotypes. The polymorphic information content values revealed by the haplotypes (0.436-0.566) were generally much higher than individual SNPs (0.247-0.259). Cluster analysis classified the 447 maize lines into two major groups, corresponding to temperate and tropical types. The level of genetic diversity and subpopulation structure were associated with the germplasm origin and post-domestication selection. Compared to temperate lines, the tropical lines had a much higher level of genetic diversity with no significant subpopulation structure identified. Significant variation in LD decay distance (2-100 kb) was found across the genome, chromosomal regions and germplasm groups. The average of LD decay distance (10-100 kb) in the temperate germplasm was two to ten times larger than that in the tropical germplasm (5-10 kb). In conclusion, tropical maize not only host high genetic diversity that can be exploited for future plant breeding, but also show rapid LD decay that provides more opportunity for selection.
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Joint linkage-linkage disequilibrium mapping is a powerful approach to detecting quantitative trait loci underlying drought tolerance in maize.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2010
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This paper describes two joint linkage-linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping approaches: parallel mapping (independent linkage and LD analysis) and integrated mapping (datasets analyzed in combination). These approaches were achieved using 2,052 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, including 659 SNPs developed from drought-response candidate genes, screened across three recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations and 305 diverse inbred lines, with anthesis-silking interval (ASI), an important trait for maize drought tolerance, as the target trait. Mapping efficiency was improved significantly due to increased population size and allele diversity and balanced allele frequencies. Integrated mapping identified 18 additional quantitative trait loci (QTL) not detected by parallel mapping. The use of haplotypes improved mapping efficiency, with the sum of phenotypic variation explained (PVE) increasing from 5.4% to 23.3% for single SNP-based analysis. Integrated mapping with haplotype further improved the mapping efficiency, and the most significant QTL had a PVE of up to 34.7%. Normal allele frequencies for 113 of 277 (40.8%) SNPs with minor allele frequency (<5%) in 305 lines were recovered in three RIL populations, three of which were significantly associated with ASI. The candidate genes identified by two significant haplotype loci included one for a SET domain protein involved in the control of flowering time and the other encoding aldo/keto reductase associated with detoxification pathways that contribute to cellular damage due to environmental stress. Joint linkage-LD mapping is a powerful approach for detecting QTL underlying complex traits, including drought tolerance.
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Genetic analysis and characterization of a new maize association mapping panel for quantitative trait loci dissection.
Theor. Appl. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2010
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Association mapping based on the linkage disequilibrium provides a promising tool to identify genes responsible for quantitative variations underlying complex traits. Presented here is a maize association mapping panel consisting of 155 inbred lines with mainly temperate germplasm, which was phenotyped for 34 traits and genotyped using 82 SSRs and 1,536 SNPs. Abundant phenotypic and genetic diversities were observed within the panel based on the phenotypic and genotypic analysis. A model-based analysis using 82 SSRs assigned all inbred lines to two groups with eight subgroups. The relative kinship matrix was calculated using 884 SNPs with minor allele frequency > or = 20% indicating that no or weak relationships were identified for most individual pairs. Three traits (total tocopherol content in maize kernel, plant height and kernel length) and 1,414 SNPs with missing data < 20% were used to evaluate the performance of four models for association mapping analysis. For all traits, the model controlling relative kinship (K) performed better than the model controlling population structure (Q), and similarly to the model controlling both population structure and relative kinship (Q + K) in this panel. Our results suggest this maize panel can be used for association mapping analysis targeting multiple agronomic and quality traits with optimal association model.
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Molecular characterization of global maize breeding germplasm based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms.
Theor. Appl. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2009
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Characterization of genetic diversity is of great value to assist breeders in parental line selection and breeding system design. We screened 770 maize inbred lines with 1,034 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and identified 449 high-quality markers with no germplasm-specific biasing effects. Pairwise comparisons across three distinct sets of germplasm, CIMMYT (394), China (282), and Brazil (94), showed that the elite lines from these diverse breeding pools have been developed with only limited utilization of genetic diversity existing in the center of origin. Temperate and tropical/subtropical germplasm clearly clustered into two separate groups. The temperate germplasm could be further divided into six groups consistent with known heterotic patterns. The greatest genetic divergence was observed between temperate and tropical/subtropical lines, followed by the divergence between yellow and white kernel lines, whereas the least divergence was observed between dent and flint lines. Long-term selection for hybrid performance has contributed to significant allele differentiation between heterotic groups at 20% of the SNP loci. There appeared to be substantial levels of genetic variation between different breeding pools as revealed by missing and unique alleles. Two SNPs developed from the same candidate gene were associated with the divergence between two opposite Chinese heterotic groups. Associated allele frequency change at two SNPs and their allele missing in Brazilian germplasm indicated a linkage disequilibrium block of 142 kb. These results confirm the power of SNP markers for diversity analysis and provide a feasible approach to unique allele discovery and use in maize breeding programs.
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Genetic characterization and linkage disequilibrium estimation of a global maize collection using SNP markers.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2009
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A newly developed maize Illumina GoldenGate Assay with 1536 SNPs from 582 loci was used to genotype a highly diverse global maize collection of 632 inbred lines from temperate, tropical, and subtropical public breeding programs. A total of 1229 informative SNPs and 1749 haplotypes within 327 loci was used to estimate the genetic diversity, population structure, and familial relatedness. Population structure identified tropical and temperate subgroups, and complex familial relationships were identified within the global collection. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was measured overall and within chromosomes, allelic frequency groups, subgroups related by geographic origin, and subgroups of different sample sizes. The LD decay distance differed among chromosomes and ranged between 1 to 10 kb. The LD distance increased with the increase of minor allelic frequency (MAF), and with smaller sample sizes, encouraging caution when using too few lines in a study. The LD decay distance was much higher in temperate than in tropical and subtropical lines, because tropical and subtropical lines are more diverse and contain more rare alleles than temperate lines. A core set of inbreds was defined based on haplotypes, and 60 lines capture 90% of the haplotype diversity of the entire panel. The defined core sets and the entire collection can be used widely for different research targets.
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Population genomic and genome-wide association studies of agroclimatic traits in sorghum.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Accelerating crop improvement in sorghum, a staple food for people in semiarid regions across the developing world, is key to ensuring global food security in the context of climate change. To facilitate gene discovery and molecular breeding in sorghum, we have characterized ~265,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 971 worldwide accessions that have adapted to diverse agroclimatic conditions. Using this genome-wide SNP map, we have characterized population structure with respect to geographic origin and morphological type and identified patterns of ancient crop diffusion to diverse agroclimatic regions across Africa and Asia. To better understand the genomic patterns of diversification in sorghum, we quantified variation in nucleotide diversity, linkage disequilibrium, and recombination rates across the genome. Analyzing nucleotide diversity in landraces, we find evidence of selective sweeps around starch metabolism genes, whereas in landrace-derived introgression lines, we find introgressions around known height and maturity loci. To identify additional loci underlying variation in major agroclimatic traits, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on plant height components and inflorescence architecture. GWAS maps several classical loci for plant height, candidate genes for inflorescence architecture. Finally, we trace the independent spread of multiple haplotypes carrying alleles for short stature or long inflorescence branches. This genome-wide map of SNP variation in sorghum provides a basis for crop improvement through marker-assisted breeding and genomic selection.
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Dissecting tocopherols content in maize (Zea mays L.), using two segregating populations and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism markers.
BMC Plant Biol.
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Tocopherols, which are vitamin E compounds, play an important role in maintaining human health. Compared with other staple foods, maize grains contain high level of tocopherols.
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An international reference consensus genetic map with 897 marker loci based on 11 mapping populations for tetraploid groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).
PLoS ONE
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Only a few genetic maps based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) and backcross (BC) populations have been developed for tetraploid groundnut. The marker density, however, is not very satisfactory especially in the context of large genome size (2800 Mb/1C) and 20 linkage groups (LGs). Therefore, using marker segregation data for 10 RILs and one BC population from the international groundnut community, with the help of common markers across different populations, a reference consensus genetic map has been developed. This map is comprised of 897 marker loci including 895 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 2 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) loci distributed on 20 LGs (a01-a10 and b01-b10) spanning a map distance of 3, 863.6 cM with an average map density of 4.4 cM. The highest numbers of markers (70) were integrated on a01 and the least number of markers (21) on b09. The marker density, however, was lowest (6.4 cM) on a08 and highest (2.5 cM) on a01. The reference consensus map has been divided into 20 cM long 203 BINs. These BINs carry 1 (a10_02, a10_08 and a10_09) to 20 (a10_04) loci with an average of 4 marker loci per BIN. Although the polymorphism information content (PIC) value was available for 526 markers in 190 BINs, 36 and 111 BINs have at least one marker with >0.70 and >0.50 PIC values, respectively. This information will be useful for selecting highly informative and uniformly distributed markers for developing new genetic maps, background selection and diversity analysis. Most importantly, this reference consensus map will serve as a reliable reference for aligning new genetic and physical maps, performing QTL analysis in a multi-populations design, evaluating the genetic background effect on QTL expression, and serving other genetic and molecular breeding activities in groundnut.
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Large-scale development of cost-effective SNP marker assays for diversity assessment and genetic mapping in chickpea and comparative mapping in legumes.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
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A set of 2486 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were compiled in chickpea using four approaches, namely (i) Solexa/Illumina sequencing (1409), (ii) amplicon sequencing of tentative orthologous genes (TOGs) (604), (iii) mining of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (286) and (iv) sequencing of candidate genes (187). Conversion of these SNPs to the cost-effective and flexible throughput Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays generated successful assays for 2005 SNPs. These marker assays have been designated as Chickpea KASPar Assay Markers (CKAMs). Screening of 70 genotypes including 58 diverse chickpea accessions and 12 BC(3) F(2) lines showed 1341 CKAMs as being polymorphic. Genetic analysis of these data clustered chickpea accessions based on geographical origin. Genotyping data generated for 671 CKAMs on the reference mapping population (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958?×?Cicer reticulatum PI 489777) were compiled with 317 unpublished TOG-SNPs and 396 published markers for developing the genetic map. As a result, a second-generation genetic map comprising 1328 marker loci including novel 625 CKAMs, 314 TOG-SNPs and 389 published marker loci with an average inter-marker distance of 0.59?cM was constructed. Detailed analyses of 1064 mapped loci of this second-generation chickpea genetic map showed a higher degree of synteny with genome of Medicago truncatula, followed by Glycine max, Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. Development of these cost-effective CKAMs for SNP genotyping will be useful not only for genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea, but also for utilizing genome information from other sequenced or model legumes.
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Coverage-based consensus calling (CbCC) of short sequence reads and comparison of CbCC results to identify SNPs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum; Fabaceae), a crop species without a reference genome.
Am. J. Bot.
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Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are frequently used for resequencing and mining of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by comparison to a reference genome. In crop species such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum) that lack a reference genome sequence, NGS-based SNP discovery is a challenge. Therefore, unlike probability-based statistical approaches for consensus calling and by comparison with a reference sequence, a coverage-based consensus calling (CbCC) approach was applied and two genotypes were compared for SNP identification.
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A comprehensive transcriptome assembly of Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) using sanger and second-generation sequencing platforms.
Mol Plant
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A comprehensive transcriptome assembly for pigeonpea has been developed by analyzing 128.9 million short Illumina GA IIx single end reads, 2.19 million single end FLX/454 reads, and 18?353 Sanger expressed sequenced tags from more than 16 genotypes. The resultant transcriptome assembly, referred to as CcTA v2, comprised 21?434 transcript assembly contigs (TACs) with an N50 of 1510?bp, the largest one being ~8?kb. Of the 21?434 TACs, 16?622 (77.5%) could be mapped on to the soybean genome build 1.0.9 under fairly stringent alignment parameters. Based on knowledge of intron junctions, 10?009 primer pairs were designed from 5033 TACs for amplifying intron spanning regions (ISRs). By using in silico mapping of BAC-end-derived SSR loci of pigeonpea on the soybean genome as a reference, putative mapping positions at the chromosome level were predicted for 6284 ISR markers, covering all 11 pigeonpea chromosomes. A subset of 128 ISR markers were analyzed on a set of eight genotypes. While 116 markers were validated, 70 markers showed one to three alleles, with an average of 0.16 polymorphism information content (PIC) value. In summary, the CcTA v2 transcript assembly and ISR markers will serve as a useful resource to accelerate genetic research and breeding applications in pigeonpea.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.