JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
High-throughput docking for the identification of new influenza A virus polymerase inhibitors targeting the PA-PB1 protein-protein interaction.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A high-throughput molecular docking approach was successfully applied for the selection of potential inhibitors of the Influenza RNA-polymerase which act by targeting the PA-PB1 protein-protein interaction. Commercially available compounds were purchased and biologically evaluated in vitro using an ELISA-based assay. As a result, some compounds possessing a 3-cyano-4,6-diphenyl-pyridine nucleus emerged as effective inhibitors with the best ones showing IC50 values in the micromolar range.
Related JoVE Video
The Fight against the Influenza A Virus H1N1: Synthesis, Molecular Modeling, and Biological Evaluation of Benzofurazan Derivatives as Viral RNA Polymerase Inhibitors.
ChemMedChem
PUBLISHED: 09-19-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The influenza RNA polymerase complex, which consists of the three subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, is a promising target for the development of new antiviral drugs. A large library of benzofurazan compounds was synthesized and assayed against influenza virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Most of the new derivatives were found to act by inhibiting the viral RNA polymerase complex through disruption of the complex formed between subunits PA and PB1. Docking studies were also performed to elucidate the binding mode of benzofurazans within the PB1 binding site in PA and to identify amino acids involved in their mechanism of action. The predicted binding pose is fully consistent with the biological data and lays the foundation for the rational development of more effective PA-PB1 inhibitors.
Related JoVE Video
Discovery and synthesis of novel benzofurazan derivatives as inhibitors of influenza A virus.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The identification of a novel hit compound inhibitor of the protein-protein interaction between the influenza RNA-polymerase PA and PB1 subunits has been accomplished by means of high-throughput screening. A small family of structurally related molecules has been synthesized and biologically evaluated with most of the compounds showing micromolar potency of inhibition against viral replication.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of high-affinity PB1-derived peptides with enhanced affinity to the PA protein of influenza A virus polymerase.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The influenza A virus polymerase complex, consisting of the subunits PB1, PB2, and PA, represents a promising target for the development of new antiviral drugs. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the protein-protein interaction domain between PA and PB1 using peptides derived from the extreme N terminus of PB1 (amino acids [aa] 1 to 15), comprising the PA-binding domain of PB1. To increase the binding affinity of these peptides, we performed a systematic structure-affinity relationship analysis. Alanine and aspartic acid scans revealed that almost all amino acids in the core binding region (aa 5 to 11) are indispensable for PA binding. Using a library of immobilized peptides representing all possible single amino acid substitutions, we were able to identify amino acid positions outside the core PA-binding region (aa 1, 3, 12, 14, and 15) that are variable and can be replaced by affinity-enhancing residues. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies revealed that combination of several affinity-enhancing mutations led to an additive effect. Thus, the feasibility to enhance the PA-binding affinity presents an intriguing possibility to increase antiviral activity of the PB1-derived peptide and one step forward in the development of an antiviral drug against influenza A viruses.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of a PA-binding peptide with inhibitory activity against influenza A and B virus replication.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There is an urgent need for new drugs against influenza type A and B viruses due to incomplete protection by vaccines and the emergence of resistance to current antivirals. The influenza virus polymerase complex, consisting of the PB1, PB2 and PA subunits, represents a promising target for the development of new drugs. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the protein-protein interaction domain between the PB1 and PA subunits of the polymerase complex of influenza A virus using a small peptide derived from the PA-binding domain of PB1. However, this influenza A virus-derived peptide did not affect influenza B virus polymerase activity. Here we report that the PA-binding domain of the polymerase subunit PB1 of influenza A and B viruses is highly conserved and that mutual amino acid exchange shows that they cannot be functionally exchanged with each other. Based on phylogenetic analysis and a novel biochemical ELISA-based screening approach, we were able to identify an influenza A-derived peptide with a single influenza B-specific amino acid substitution which efficiently binds to PA of both virus types. This dual-binding peptide blocked the viral polymerase activity and growth of both virus types. Our findings provide proof of principle that protein-protein interaction inhibitors can be generated against influenza A and B viruses. Furthermore, this dual-binding peptide, combined with our novel screening method, is a promising platform to identify new antiviral lead compounds.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.