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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mapping the Nasal Airways: Using Histology to Enhance CT-Based Three-Dimensional Reconstruction in Nycticebus.
Anat Rec (Hoboken)
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2014
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Three-dimensional reconstructions of imaging data are an increasingly common approach for studying anatomical structure. However, certain aspects of anatomy, including microscopic structure and differentiating tissue types, continue to benefit from traditional histological analyses. We present here a detailed methodology for combining data from microCT and histological imaging to create 3D virtual reconstructions for visualization and further analyses. We used this approach to study the distribution of olfactory mucosa on ethmoturbinal I of an adult pygmy slow loris, Nycticebus pygmaeus. MicroCT imaging of the specimen was followed by processing, embedding, and sectioning for histological analysis. We identified corresponding features in the CT and histological data, and used these to reconstruct the plane of section in the CT volume. The CT volume was then digitally re-sliced, such that orthogonal sections of the CT image corresponded to histological sections. Histological images were annotated for the features of interest (in this case, the contour of soft tissue on ethmoturbinal I and the extent of olfactory mucosa), and annotations were transferred to binary masks in the CT volume. These masks were combined with density-based surface reconstructions of the skull to create an enhanced 3D virtual reconstruction, in which the bony surfaces are coded for mucosal function. We identified a series of issues that may be raised in this approach, for example, deformation related to histological processing, and we make recommendations for addressing these issues. This method provides an evidence-based approach to 3D visualization and analysis of microscopic features in an anatomic context. Anat Rec, 297:2113-2120, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Clustering of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in the polycystic ovary syndrome: a principal component analysis.
Metab. Clin. Exp.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent condition with heterogeneity of clinical features and cardiovascular risk factors that implies multiple aetiological factors and possible outcomes.
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The omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA decrease plasma F(2)-isoprostanes: Results from two placebo-controlled interventions.
Free Radic. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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Omega-3 (omega3) fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), protect against cardiovascular disease. Despite these benefits, concern remains that omega3 fatty acids may increase lipid peroxidation. It has previously been shown that urinary F(2)-isoprostanes (F(2)-IsoPs) were reduced following omega3 fatty acid supplementation in humans. It is now determined whether EPA or DHA supplementation affects plasma F(2)-IsoPs. In two 6-week placebo-controlled interventions, Study A: overweight, dyslipidaemic men; and Study B: treated-hypertensive Type 2 diabetic, patients were randomized to 4 g daily EPA, DHA. Post-intervention plasma F(2)-IsoPs were significantly reduced by EPA (24% in Study A, 19% in Study B) and by DHA (14% in Study A, 23% in Study B) relative to the olive oil group. The fall in plasma F(2)-IsoPs was not altered in analyses that corrected for changes in plasma arachidonic acid, which was reduced with EPA and DHA supplementation. Neither F(3)- nor F(4)-IsoPs were observed in plasma in both studies. These results show that in humans, EPA and DHA reduce in vivo oxidant stress as measured in human plasma and urine.
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A comparison of the effects of swimming and walking on body weight, fat distribution, lipids, glucose, and insulin in older women--the Sedentary Women Exercise Adherence Trial 2.
Metab. Clin. Exp.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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All types of aerobic exercise are assumed to affect cardiovascular risk similarly. There are few studies of swimming, but complex responses to water-based exercise suggest its potential for differential effects. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of swimming and walking on fitness, body weight, lipids, glucose, and insulin in older women. Sedentary women aged 50 to 70 years (N = 116), randomly assigned to swimming or walking plus usual care or a behavioral intervention, completed 3 sessions per week of moderate-intensity exercise, supervised for 6 months then unsupervised for 6 months. After 6 months, 1.6-km walk time decreased in walkers and swimmers, with greater improvement in walkers (1.0 vs 0.6 minute, P = .001). In swimmers, but not walkers, distance swum in 12 minutes increased (78.1 vs -2.2 m, P = .021). Waist and hip circumferences (80.8 vs 83.1 cm and 101.8 vs 102.4 cm; P = .023 and P = .042, respectively) and insulin area under the curve (oral glucose tolerance test) (5128 vs 5623 ?U/[L 120 min], P < .05) were lower with swimming. Lipids did not differ between groups. At 12 months, fitness was maintained. Relative to walking, swimming reduced body weight by (1.1 kg, P = .039) and resulted in lower total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.3 and 0.2 mmol/L; P = .040 and P = .049, respectively). The magnitude of the difference in the reduction of insulin area under the curve between swimming and walking was greater at 12 months; however, the significance was attenuated (4677 vs 5240 ?U/[L 120 min], P = .052). Compared with walking, swimming improved body weight, body fat distribution, and insulin in the short term and, in the longer term, body weight and lipid measures. These findings suggest that the type of exercise can influence health benefits.
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A cohort study of missed and new cancers after esophagogastroduodenoscopy.
Am. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Little is known about missed rates of upper gastrointestinal cancer (UGC) in Western populations, with most data originating from Japanese centers quoting high missed rates of 23.5-25.8%. The objective of this study was to better define missed rates of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and the natural history of UGC in a Western population that underwent an initial EGD without cancer, but were subsequently diagnosed with a UGC. Our hypothesis was that a normal EGD rarely misses the detection of UGC.
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Interferon-induced thyroid dysfunction in chronic hepatitis C.
J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2009
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Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon is known to be associated with thyroid dysfunction (TD) in 5-14% of patients. We studied the incidence, types, outcome and risk factors predictive of thyroid dysfunction.
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The effects of [omega]3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 on blood pressure and heart rate in chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2009
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Chronic kidney disease (CKD) associates with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Hypertension is a major determinant of progression of CKD. Omega-3 fatty acids (omger3FA) protect against CVD via improvements in blood pressure, heart rate, vascular reactivity and serum lipids. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ) may improve blood pressure and vascular function. This study determined whether omega3FA and CoQ have independent or additive effects in improving the cardiovascular profile, particularly blood pressure and heart rate, in nondiabetic patients with CKD stages 3-4.
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A score test for assessing the cured proportion in the long-term survivor mixture model.
Stat Med
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2009
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The long-term survivor mixture model is commonly applied to analyse survival data when some individuals may never experience the failure event of interest. A score test is presented to assess whether the cured proportion is significant to justify the long-term survivor mixture model. Sampling distribution and power of the test statistic are evaluated by simulation studies. The results confirm that the proposed test statistic performs well in finite sample situations. The test procedure is illustrated using a breast cancer survival data set and the clustered multivariate failure times from a multi-centre clinical trial of carcinoma.
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Fluctuating asymmetry and developmental instability in sagittal craniosynostosis.
Cleft Palate Craniofac. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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To determine whether premature sagittal craniosynostosis is associated with developmental instability in the skull by analyzing fluctuating asymmetry in skull shape.
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Synergy between adiposity, insulin resistance, metabolic risk factors, and inflammation in adolescents.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
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The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between inflammatory markers and components of a metabolic syndrome cluster in adolescents.
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Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment--a position paper of the The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
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In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.
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Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment: a position paper of The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich)
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In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.