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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The effects of eccentric exercise on muscle function and proprioception of individuals being overweight and underweight.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 09-07-2013
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The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of being overweight or underweight on proprioception at rest and after muscle damaging eccentric exercise. Twelve lean, 12 overweight, and 8 underweight female participants performed an eccentric exercise session using the knee extensor muscles of the dominant leg. Muscle damage indices and proprioception were assessed up to 3 days postexercise. The results indicated that proprioception at baseline of the lean individuals was superior to that of the other 2 groups. The overweight individuals exhibited a smaller knee joint reaction angle to release than did the lean group, whereas the underweight individuals exhibited a larger reaction angle to release than did the lean group. After eccentric exercise, proprioception was affected more in the overweight and the underweight groups than in the lean group. The greater exercise-induced muscle damage appeared in the overweight group, and the deficient muscle mass of the underweight participants could explain in part the greater disturbances that appeared in proprioception in these 2 groups than for the lean counterparts. In conclusion, deviating from the normal body mass is associated with significant disturbances in the proprioception of the legs at rest and after participation in activities involving eccentric actions.
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Stair descending exercise increases muscle strength in elderly males with chronic heart failure.
BMC Res Notes
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2013
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Previous studies from our group have shown that "pure" eccentric exercise performed on an isokinetic dynamometer can induce health-promoting effects that may improve quality of life. In order to investigate whether the benefits of "pure" eccentric exercise can be transferred to daily activities, a new and friendlier way to perform eccentric exercise had to be invented. To this end, we have proceeded to the design and construction of an automatic escalator, offering both stair descending (eccentric-biased) and stair ascending (concentric-biased) exercise.
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Stair descending exercise using a novel automatic escalator: effects on muscle performance and health-related parameters.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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A novel automatic escalator was designed, constructed and used in the present investigation. The aim of the present investigation was to compare the effect of two repeated sessions of stair descending versus stair ascending exercise on muscle performance and health-related parameters in young healthy men. Twenty males participated and were randomly divided into two equal-sized groups: a stair descending group (muscle-damaging group) and a stair ascending group (non-muscle-damaging group). Each group performed two sessions of stair descending or stair ascending exercise on the automatic escalator while a three week period was elapsed between the two exercise sessions. Indices of muscle function, insulin sensitivity, blood lipid profile and redox status were assessed before and immediately after, as well as at day 2 and day 4 after both exercise sessions. It was found that the first bout of stair descending exercise caused muscle damage, induced insulin resistance and oxidative stress as well as affected positively blood lipid profile. However, after the second bout of stair descending exercise the alterations in all parameters were diminished or abolished. On the other hand, the stair ascending exercise induced only minor effects on muscle function and health-related parameters after both exercise bouts. The results of the present investigation indicate that stair descending exercise seems to be a promising way of exercise that can provoke positive effects on blood lipid profile and antioxidant status.
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Aging is not a barrier to muscle and redox adaptations: applying the repeated eccentric exercise model.
Exp. Gerontol.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2013
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Despite the progress of analytic techniques and the refinement of study designs, striking disagreement exists among studies regarding the influence of exercise on muscle function and redox homeostasis in the elderly. The repeated eccentric exercise model was applied to produce long-lasting and extensive changes in redox biomarkers and to reveal more effectively the potential effects of aging on redox homeostasis. Ten young (20.6±0.5 years) and ten elderly men (64.6±1.1 years) underwent an isokinetic eccentric exercise session, which was repeated after three weeks. Muscle function/damage indices (torque, range of movement, muscle soreness and creatine kinase) and redox biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls, glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, uric acid, bilirubin and albumin) were assessed in plasma, erythrocytes or urine pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise and at 2 and 4 days post-exercise. As expected, the elderly group exhibited oxidative stress in baseline compared to the young group. Extensive muscle damage and extensive alterations in redox homeostasis appeared after the first bout of eccentric exercise. Noteworthy, the redox responses were similar between the age groups despite their differences in baseline values. Likewise, both age groups demonstrated blunted alterations in muscle damage and redox homeostasis after the second bout of eccentric exercise indicating adaptations from the first bout of exercise. Elderly individuals seem to be well fitted to participate in demanding physical activities without suffering detrimental effects on skeletal muscle and/or disturbances on redox homeostasis. The repeated eccentric exercise model may be a useful and practical physiological tool to study redox biology in humans.
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The effects of low and high glycemic index foods on exercise performance and beta-endorphin responses.
J Int Soc Sports Nutr
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2011
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?he aim of this study was to examine the effects of the consumption of foods of various glycemic index values on performance, ?-endorphin levels and substrate (fat and carbohydrate) utilization during prolonged exercise. Eight untrained healthy males underwent, in a randomized counterbalanced design, three experimental conditions under which they received carbohydrates (1.5 gr. kg-1 of body weight) of low glycemic index (LGI), high glycemic index (HGI) or placebo. Food was administered 30 min prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at an intensity corresponding to 65% of VO2max, which was increased to 90% of VO2max, then they cycled until exhaustion and the time to exhaustion was recorded. Blood was collected prior to food consumption, 15 min prior to exercise, 0, 20, 40, and 60 min into exercise as well as at exhaustion. Blood was analyzed for ?-endorphin, glucose, insulin, and lactate. The mean time to exhaustion did not differ between the three conditions (LGI = 3.2 ± 0.9 min; HGI = 2.9 ± 0.9 min; placebo = 2.7 ± 0.7 min). There was a significant interaction in glucose and insulin response (P < 0.05) with HGI exhibiting higher values before exercise. ?-endorphin increased significantly (P < 0.05) at the end of exercise without, however, a significant interaction between the three conditions. Rate of perceived exertion, heart rate, ventilation, lactate, respiratory quotient and substrate oxidation rate did not differ between the three conditions. The present study indicates that ingestion of foods of different glycemic index 30 min prior to one hour cycling exercise does not result in significant changes in exercise performance, ?-endorphin levels as well as carbohydrate and fat oxidation during exercise.
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Isokinetic knee joint evaluation in track and field events.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2011
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate maximal torque of the knee flexors and extensors, flexor/extensor ratios, and maximal torque differences between the 2 lower extremities in young track and field athletes. Forty male track and field athletes 13-17 years old and 20 male nonathletes of the same age participated in the study. Athletes were divided into 4 groups according to their age and event (12 runners and 10 jumpers 13-15 years old, 12 runners and 6 jumpers 16-17 years old) and nonathletes into 2 groups of the same age. Maximal torque evaluation of knee flexors and extensors was performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s(-1). At the age of 16-17 years, jumpers exhibited higher strength values at extension than did runners and nonathletes, whereas at the age of 13-15 years, no significant differences were found between events. Younger athletes were weaker than older athletes at flexion. Runners and jumpers were stronger than nonathletes in all relative peak torque parameters. Nonathletes exhibited a higher flexor/extensor ratio compared with runners and jumpers. Strength imbalance in athletes was found between the 2 lower extremities in knee flexors and extensors and also at flexor/extensor ratio of the same extremity. Young track and field athletes exhibit strength imbalances that could reduce their athletic performance, and specific strength training for the weak extremity may be needed.
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No effect of antioxidant supplementation on muscle performance and blood redox status adaptations to eccentric training.
Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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It was recently reported that antioxidant supplementation decreases training efficiency and prevents cellular adaptations to chronic exercise.
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The effects of muscle damage on walking biomechanics are speed-dependent.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of muscle damage on walking biomechanics at different speeds. Seventeen young women completed a muscle damage protocol of 5 × 15 maximal eccentric actions of the knee extensors and flexors of both legs at 60°/s. Lower body kinematics and swing-phase kinetics were assessed on a horizontal treadmill pre- and 48 h post-muscle damaging exercise at four walking speeds. Evaluated muscle damage indices included isometric torque, delayed onset muscle soreness, and serum creatine kinase. All muscle damage indices changed significantly after exercise, indicating muscle injury. Kinematic results indicated that post-exercise knee joint was significantly more flexed (31-260%) during stance-phase and knee range of motion was reduced at certain phases of the gait cycle at all speeds. Walking post-exercise at the two lower speeds revealed a more extended knee joint (3.1-3.6%) during the swing-phase, but no differences were found between pre- and post-exercise conditions at the two higher speeds. As speed increased, maximum dorsiflexion angle during stance-phase significantly decreased pre-exercise (5.7-11.8%), but remained unaltered post-exercise across all speeds (p > 0.05). Moreover, post-exercise maximum hip extension decreased (3.6-18.8%), pelvic tilt increased (5.5-10.6%), and tempo-spatial differences were found across all speeds (p < 0.05). Limited effects of muscle damage were observed regarding swing-phase kinetics. In conclusion, walking biomechanics following muscle damage are affected differently at relatively higher walking speeds, especially with respect to knee and ankle joint motion. The importance of speed in evaluating walking biomechanics following muscle damage is highlighted.
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Differences between arms and legs on position sense and joint reaction angle.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2009
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The purpose of the present investigation was to compare the arms and legs in relation to position sense and joint reaction angle. Position sense at 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees flexion as well as joint reaction angle to release from 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees flexion of the elbow and knee joint were evaluated in 12 healthy men. The measurements were performed over 3 consecutive days to minimize the error attributable to the variability of the measured parameters. During the assessment of position sense, subjects had to place their limb as closely as possible to the reference angle. The joint reaction angle was measured by a new test in which the subjects had to stop the fall of their limb as soon as possible after it was released. All measurements were performed in a common isokinetic dynamometer. The results of position sense showed that the arms were placed closer to the reference angle compared with the legs (1.3 degrees vs. 3.1 degrees on average for 3 angles, respectively; p < 0.05). The arms also exhibited faster reaction angle to release compared with legs (3.4 degrees vs. 6.3 degrees on average for 3 angles, respectively; p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ability of arms to perform more accurate and faster movements than legs may mainly be attributed to the higher number of muscle spindles and the lower innervation ratio of arms. An imbalance of the determined relationship between arms and legs in position sense and reaction angle may indicate a neuromuscular disturbance.
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Adipocytokine levels in children: effects of fatness and training.
Pediatr Exerc Sci
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To investigate the effects of obesity and exercise training on plasma adipocytokines a sample of 42 children (lean = 24, %BF = 17.8 ± 7.5%; obese = 18; %BF = 29.1 ± 9.3%; mean age = 12.4 ± 1.9 yrs), were divided into 4 age-matched for activity groups: lean inactive (n = 11), obese inactive (n = 9), lean active (n = 13) and obese active (n = 9). Active children participated in swimming training (?1 year, ?3 times/week, ?1 h per session, covering a distance of 10,000-12,000 m per week).Obese individuals demonstrated greater visfatin levels (3.3 ± 1.3 ng/ml) than their lean counterparts (2.6 ± 1.1 ng/ml; p = .06) whereas adiponectin was significantly lower in obese children (3.8 ± 1.9) than their lean counterparts (5.9 ± 2.7; p £ .05). Insulin and HOMA values were significantly greater in obese compared with lean children (p £ .05). Within obese individuals, active individuals had significantly lower visfatin levels (2.8 ± 1.2 ng/ml) compared with their inactive counterparts (3.8 ± 1.2 ng/ml; p £ .05). Resistin levels were comparable between groups (p > .05). Childhood obesity elevates visfatin and lowers adiponectin levels whereas exercise training could reduce visfatin levels in obese children.
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Low-frequency fatigue as an indicator of eccentric exercise-induced muscle injury: the role of vitamin E.
Oxid Med Cell Longev
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This study investigates whether vitamin E can attenuate eccentric exercise-induced soleus muscle injury as indicated by the amelioration of in situ isometric force decline following a low-frequency fatigue protocol (stimulation at 4?Hz for 5?min) and the ability of the muscle to recover 3?min after the termination of the fatigue protocol. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into vitamin E-supplemented or placebo-supplemented groups studied at rest, immediately post-exercise or 48?h post-exercise. Daily dl-?-tocopheryl acetate intraperitoneal injections of 100?mg/kg body mass for 5 consecutive days prior to exercise doubled its plasma levels. Fatigue index and recovery index expressed as a percentage of the initial tension. FI at 0?h post- and 48?h post-exercise respectively was 88%?±?4.2% and 89%?±?6.8% in the vitamin E groups versus 76%?±?3% and 80%?±?11% in the placebo groups. RI was 99%?±?3.4% and 100%?±?6% in the vitamin E groups versus 82%?±?3.1% and 84%?±?5.9% in the placebo groups. Complementally to the traditionally recorded maximal force, low-frequency fatigue measures may be beneficial for assessing injury-induced decrease in muscle functionality.
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Dance as an eccentric form of exercise: practical implications.
Med Probl Perform Art
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The eccentric action is an integral part of the stretch-shortening (or eccentric-concentric) cycle of muscle movement, especially when repositioning of the centre of gravity is required. Jumps and landing tasks are examples of this cycle and are incorporated in most dance activities. However, unaccustomed eccentric muscle action can cause muscle damage, which is characterised by the development of delayed-onset muscle soreness and swelling, decline of pain-free range of motion, as well as sustained loss of muscle force and range of motion. Furthermore, unaccustomed eccentric muscle action can induce disturbances in movement economy and energy expenditure, so dancers spend more energy during a routine than usual. Such negative effects are gradually reduced and eventually disappear due to physiological adaptations to this form of muscular activity. Given that eccentric exercises also appear to induce greater muscle performance improvements than other forms of muscle conditioning, it is advised that they should be integrated into dancers weekly schedules. The purpose of the present review is to examine the possible effects of the eccentric component of dance on the performance and health status of dancers.
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Redox biology of exercise: an integrative and comparative consideration of some overlooked issues.
J. Exp. Biol.
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The central aim of this review is to address the highly multidisciplinary topic of redox biology as related to exercise using an integrative and comparative approach rather than focusing on blood, skeletal muscle or humans. An attempt is also made to re-define oxidative stress as well as to introduce the term alterations in redox homeostasis to describe changes in redox homeostasis indicating oxidative stress, reductive stress or both. The literature analysis shows that the effects of non-muscle-damaging exercise and muscle-damaging exercise on redox homeostasis are completely different. Non-muscle-damaging exercise induces alterations in redox homeostasis that last a few hours post exercise, whereas muscle-damaging exercise causes alterations in redox homeostasis that may persist for and/or appear several days post exercise. Both exhaustive maximal exercise lasting only 30 s and isometric exercise lasting 1-3 min (the latter activating in addition a small muscle mass) induce systemic oxidative stress. With the necessary modifications, exercise is capable of inducing redox homeostasis alterations in all fluids, cells, tissues and organs studied so far, irrespective of strains and species. More importantly, exercise-induced oxidative stress is not an oddity associated with a particular type of exercise, tissue or species. Rather, oxidative stress constitutes a ubiquitous fundamental biological response to the alteration of redox homeostasis imposed by exercise. The hormesis concept could provide an interpretative framework to reconcile differences that emerge among studies in the field of exercise redox biology. Integrative and comparative approaches can help determine the interactions of key redox responses at multiple levels of biological organization.
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Exercise as a model to study redox homeostasis in blood: the effect of protocol and sampling point.
Biomarkers
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Twenty males ran either on a level treadmill (nonmuscle-damaging condition) or on a downhill treadmill (muscle-damaging condition). Blood and urine samples were collected before and after exercise (immediately after, 1h, 4h, 24h, 48h, and 96h). The following assays were performed: F(2)-isoprostanes in urine, protein carbonyls in plasma, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in erythrocytes. The main finding was that monophasic redox responses were detected after nonmuscle-damaging exercise compared to the biphasic responses detected after muscle-damaging exercise. Based on these findings, muscle-damaging exercise may be a more appropriate experimental model to induce physiological oxidative stress.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.