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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Real-world use patterns of olanzapine long-acting injection in the United States: comparison to the recommended dosing strategy.
Curr Med Res Opin
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2013
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Recommended doses for olanzapine long-acting injection (olanzapine LAI) are 150 mg/2 weeks, 210?mg/2 weeks, 300 mg/2 or 4 weeks, and 405 mg/4 weeks. This analysis evaluated the dosing and interval patterns to compare the actual dosing patterns with the recommended dosing strategy.
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Reasons for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine in the treatment of schizophrenia from the perspectives of patients and clinicians.
Patient Prefer Adherence
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2011
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The aim of this study was to assess the reasons for discontinuing or continuing olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia, from the perspectives of the patients and their clinicians.
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Analysis of gene variants previously associated with iloperidone response in patients with schizophrenia who are treated with risperidone.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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We examined 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated with response to iloperidone therapy for association with response to risperidone therapy.
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Assessment of treatment algorithms including amantadine, metformin, and zonisamide for the prevention of weight gain with olanzapine: a randomized controlled open-label study.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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This 22-week, open-label study, conducted between November 2006 and September 2008 in a community setting, was designed to determine if weight gain during olanzapine treatment can be prevented or mitigated with adjunctive treatment algorithms that include amantadine, metformin, and zonisamide.
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Weight gain and changes in metabolic variables following olanzapine treatment in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
Clin Drug Investig
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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Antipsychotic therapy forms the cornerstone of treatment for people with severe mental illness. Second-generation (atypical) antipsychotics are associated with a significantly lower incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms than the typical, first-generation agents; however, changes in metabolic variables -- including impaired glucose metabolism, diabetes mellitus, weight gain and dyslipidaemia -- have been reported during treatment with second-generation antipsychotics. Understanding any potential link between antipsychotic treatment and the incidence of these events is complicated by the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes occurring in the general population and the increased risk of diabetes and changes in metabolic variables in people with schizophrenia. While relative risk estimates are inconsistent, the association between atypical antipsychotics and increases in glucose level appears to fall on a continuum, with olanzapine appearing to have a greater association than some other atypical antipsychotics. The PubMed database was used to search for publications that included any information on measures of changes in weight, body mass index (BMI) and/or metabolic variables in randomized studies of olanzapine published between 1992 and 2010. In long-term (?48 weeks) studies of olanzapine, the mean weight gain was 5.6?kg (last observation carried forward; median exposure 573 days). The proportions of patients who gained at least 7%, 15% or 25% of their baseline weight with long-term exposure were 64%, 32% and 12%, respectively. Some studies have suggested that weight gain early during the course of olanzapine treatment may predict clinically significant weight gain following long-term exposure to the drug. Changes in metabolic variables, such as elevated indices of glucose metabolism and triglyceride level, have also been observed during treatment with olanzapine. Consensus guidelines emphasize the importance of appropriate baseline screening and ongoing monitoring of weight gain and metabolic variables for people receiving all antipsychotic treatments. Long-term weight management programmes have been shown to reduce weight gain in some patients.
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Impact of race on efficacy and safety during treatment with olanzapine in schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder.
BMC Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2010
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To examine potential differences in efficacy and safety of treatment with olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia of white and black descent.
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The potential role of appetite in predicting weight changes during treatment with olanzapine.
BMC Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2010
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Clinically significant weight gain has been reported during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. It has been suggested that weight changes in patients treated with olanzapine may be associated with increased appetite.
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Factors associated with weight gain during olanzapine treatment in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder: results from a six-month prospective, multinational, observational study.
World J. Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2009
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The aim of this 6-month observational study was to examine which clinical, eating- and lifestyle-related factors were associated with weight gain in patients initiating or switching to oral olanzapine for the treatment of schizophrenia or bipolar mania. A total of 622 outpatients in four countries (China, Mexico, Romania, Taiwan) were assessed at monthly intervals for up to 6 months. Mixed model repeated-measures analysis, adjusted for baseline weight, was used to identify which factors were associated with weight gain during olanzapine therapy. After 6 months of therapy, the LS mean weight change was +4.1 kg and 43.9% of the patients had significant (> or = 7%) weight gain. Early significant weight gain after 2 months of therapy occurred in 23.4% of the patients and these patients gained significantly more weight overall. Ten factors were associated with weight gain during 6 months of olanzapine therapy in an exploratory multivariate analysis: country, housing conditions, stronger appetite, excessive amount of food needed to feel full, eating until uncomfortably full, thoughts preoccupied with food, meal location, increased meal frequency, evening snack consumption, and a lower amount of vigorous exercise. These results indicate that the influence of environmental, eating- and lifestyle-related factors should be considered when assessing weight gain during olanzapine therapy.
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Predictors and correlates for weight changes in patients co-treated with olanzapine and weight mitigating agents; a post-hoc analysis.
BMC Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2009
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This study focuses on exploring the relationship between changes in appetite or eating behaviors and subsequent weight change for adult patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder treated with olanzapine and adjunctive potential weight mitigating pharmacotherapy. The aim is not to compare different weight mitigating agents, but to evaluate patients characteristics and changes in their eating behaviors during treatment. Identification of patient subgroups with different degrees of susceptibility to the effect of weight mitigating agents during olanzapine treatment may aid clinicians in treatment decisions.
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Early predictors of weight gain risk during treatment with olanzapine: analysis of pooled data from 58 clinical trials.
Psychopharmacol Bull
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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This analysis evaluated the usefulness of different predictors in identifying patient risk of substantial weight gain (SWG) during olanzapine treatment. Data were from 58 studies with 3826 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, or borderline personality disorder. The primary definition for SWG was gaining >/=12% of baseline weight by endpoint (30 weeks +/-5 weeks); other definitions of SWG were also examined. Potential predictors of SWG included baseline patient characteristics, weight change, and percent weight change at Weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4 after olanzapine initiation. To facilitate model building and validation, the data set was randomly partitioned into training (N = 1912), validation (N = 1149), and test (N = 765) sets and 2 complementary analytic techniques were used: logistic regression with stepwise variable selection followed by receiver operating characteristic analysis for evaluation of resulting candidate models and decision trees. Approximately 24% of patients gained >/=12% of their initial weight, about 30% gained >/=10%, and 45% gained >/=7% or >/=5 kg by the 30-week endpoint. Baseline covariates significantly and positively associated with probability of SWG were lower baseline body mass index, younger age, female sex, United States residency, and African ethnicity. Early weight changes substantially improved the prediction of the risk for longer-term SWG. These results confirm that cut-offs for weight gain during the first 4 weeks of treatment may be useful in evaluating SWG risk for an individual patient.
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Pharmacogenomic associations with weight gain in olanzapine treatment of patients without schizophrenia.
J Clin Psychiatry
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Pharmacogenomic analyses of weight gain during treatment with second-generation antipsychotics have resulted in a number of associations with variants in ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1)/dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) genes. These studies primarily assessed subjects with schizophrenia who had prior antipsychotic exposure that may have influenced the amount of weight gained from subsequent therapies. We assessed the relationships between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes with weight gain during treatment with olanzapine in a predominantly antipsychotic-naive population.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.