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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Design and fabrication of memory devices based on nanoscale polyoxometalate clusters.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Flash memory devices-that is, non-volatile computer storage media that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed-are vital for portable electronics, but the scaling down of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) flash memory to sizes of below ten nanometres per data cell presents challenges. Molecules have been proposed to replace MOS flash memory, but they suffer from low electrical conductivity, high resistance, low device yield, and finite thermal stability, limiting their integration into current MOS technologies. Although great advances have been made in the pursuit of molecule-based flash memory, there are a number of significant barriers to the realization of devices using conventional MOS technologies. Here we show that core-shell polyoxometalate (POM) molecules can act as candidate storage nodes for MOS flash memory. Realistic, industry-standard device simulations validate our approach at the nanometre scale, where the device performance is determined mainly by the number of molecules in the storage media and not by their position. To exploit the nature of the core-shell POM clusters, we show, at both the molecular and device level, that embedding [(Se(iv)O3)2](4-) as an oxidizable dopant in the cluster core allows the oxidation of the molecule to a [Se(v)2O6](2-) moiety containing a {Se(v)-Se(v)} bond (where curly brackets indicate a moiety, not a molecule) and reveals a new 5+ oxidation state for selenium. This new oxidation state can be observed at the device level, resulting in a new type of memory, which we call 'write-once-erase'. Taken together, these results show that POMs have the potential to be used as a realistic nanoscale flash memory. Also, the configuration of the doped POM core may lead to new types of electrical behaviour. This work suggests a route to the practical integration of configurable molecules in MOS technologies as the lithographic scales approach the molecular limit.
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Towards polyoxometalate-cluster-based nano-electronics.
Chemistry
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2013
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We explore the concept that the incorporation of polyoxometalates (POMs) into complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technologies could offer a fundamentally better way to design and engineer new types of data storage devices, due to the enhanced electronic complementarity with SiO2 , high redox potentials, and multiple redox states accessible to polyoxometalate clusters. To explore this we constructed a custom-built simulation domain bridge. Connecting DFT, for the quantum mechanical modelling part, and mesoscopic device modelling, confirms the theoretical basis for the proposed advantages of POMs in non-volatile molecular memories (NVMM) or flash-RAM.
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Influence of low-symmetry distortions on electron transport through metal atom chains: when is a molecular wire really "broken"?
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2011
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In the field of molecular electronics, an intimate link between the delocalization of molecular orbitals and their ability to support current flow is often assumed. Delocalization, in turn, is generally regarded as being synonymous with structural symmetry, for example, in the lengths of the bonds along a molecular wire. In this work, we use density functional theory in combination with nonequilibrium Greens functions to show that precisely the opposite is true in the extended metal atom chain Cr(3)(dpa)(4)(NCS)(2) where the delocalized ? framework has previously been proposed to be the dominant conduction pathway. Low-symmetry distortions of the Cr(3) core do indeed reduce the effectiveness of these ? channels, but this is largely irrelevant to electron transport at low bias simply because they lie far below the Fermi level. Instead, the dominant pathway is through higher-lying orbitals of ? symmetry, which remain essentially unperturbed by even quite substantial distortions. In fact, the conductance is actually increased marginally because the ?(nb) channel is displaced upward toward the Fermi level. These calculations indicate a subtle and counterintuitive relationship between structure and function in these metal chains that has important implications for the interpretation of data emerging from scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy experiments.
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Efficient spin filtering through cobalt-based extended metal atom chains.
Inorg Chem
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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Density functional theory in conjunction with nonequilibrium Greens functions has been used to explore charge transport through the cobalt-based extended metal atom chain, Co(3)(dpa)(4)(NCS)(2). The isolated molecule has a doublet ground state, and the singly occupied sigma nonbonding orbital proves to be the dominant transport channel, providing spin filtering efficiencies in excess of 90%. The metal chain differs from typical organic conductors in that the pi orbitals that form the contact with the gold electrode are orthogonal to the transport channel. As a result, the rehybridization of these pi levels by the applied electric field has only a minor impact on the current, allowing spin filtering to persist even at biases in excess of 1 V.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.