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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Low levels of HIV-1 RNA detected in the cerebrospinal fluid after up to 10 years of suppressive therapy are associated with local immune activation.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2014
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Though combination antiretroviral therapy reduces the concentration of HIV-1 RNA in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) below the detection limit of clinical assays, low levels of HIV-1 RNA are frequently detectable in plasma using more sensitive assays. We examined the frequency and magnitude of persistent low-level HIV-1 RNA in CSF and its relation to the central nervous system (CNS) immune activation.
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An example of genetically distinct HIV-1 variants in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma during suppressive therapy.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 12-12-2013
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We sequenced HIV-1 in 70 CSF and 29 plasma samples and the corresponding pre-therapy samples from 17 subjects on suppressive therapy. More of the CSF sequences were hypermutants than plasma sequences. We generated on-therapy sequences from both CSF and plasma from two subjects; in one we found genetically distinct sequences in CSF and plasma indicating that they came from two different compartments, one potentially the CNS, during suppressive therapy. In addition, there was little evidence of viral evolution in the CSF during therapy, suggesting that continuous virus replication is not the major cause of viral persistence in the CNS.
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Single-copy assay quantification of HIV-1 RNA in paired cerebrospinal fluid and plasma samples from elite controllers.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2013
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Elite controllers are a rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals who maintain HIV-1 RNA concentrations in plasma below the lower limit of quantification of clinical assays (<20-50 copies/ml) in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Here, we examine to what extent elite controllers also control infection of the central nervous system (CNS).
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The immunologic effects of maraviroc intensification in treated HIV-infected individuals with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery: a randomized trial.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has been hypothesized to decrease T-cell activation in HIV-infected individuals, but its independent immunologic effects have not been established in a placebo-controlled trial. We randomized 45 HIV-infected subjects with CD4 counts <350 cells per mm(3) and plasma HIV RNA levels <48 copies per mL on antiretroviral therapy (ART) to add maraviroc vs placebo to their regimen for 24 weeks followed by 12 weeks on ART alone. Compared with placebo-treated subjects, maraviroc-treated subjects unexpectedly experienced a greater median increase in % CD38+HLA-DR+ peripheral blood CD8+ T cells at week 24 (+2.2% vs -0.7%, P = .014), and less of a decline in activated CD4+ T cells (P < .001). The % CD38+HLA-DR+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased nearly twofold in rectal tissue (both P < .001), and plasma CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) ligand (macrophage-inflammatory protein 1?) levels increased 2.4-fold during maraviroc intensification (P < .001). During maraviroc intensification, plasma lipopolysaccharide declined, whereas sCD14 levels and neutrophils tended to increase in blood and rectal tissue. Although the mechanisms explaining these findings remain unclear, CCR5 ligand-mediated activation of T cells, macrophages, and neutrophils via alternative chemokine receptors should be explored. These results may have relevance for trials of maraviroc for HIV preexposure prophylaxis and graft-versus-host disease. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00735072.
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Comparative analysis of measures of viral reservoirs in HIV-1 eradication studies.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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HIV-1 reservoirs preclude virus eradication in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The best characterized reservoir is a small, difficult-to-quantify pool of resting memory CD4(+) T cells carrying latent but replication-competent viral genomes. Because strategies targeting this latent reservoir are now being tested in clinical trials, well-validated high-throughput assays that quantify this reservoir are urgently needed. Here we compare eleven different approaches for quantitating persistent HIV-1 in 30 patients on HAART, using the original viral outgrowth assay for resting CD4(+) T cells carrying inducible, replication-competent viral genomes as a standard for comparison. PCR-based assays for cells containing HIV-1 DNA gave infected cell frequencies at least 2 logs higher than the viral outgrowth assay, even in subjects who started HAART during acute/early infection. This difference may reflect defective viral genomes. The ratio of infected cell frequencies determined by viral outgrowth and PCR-based assays varied dramatically between patients. Although strong correlations with the viral outgrowth assay could not be formally excluded for most assays, correlations achieved statistical significance only for integrated HIV-1 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HIV-1 RNA/DNA ratio in rectal CD4(+) T cells. Residual viremia was below the limit of detection in many subjects and did not correlate with the viral outgrowth assays. The dramatic differences in infected cell frequencies and the lack of a precise correlation between culture and PCR-based assays raise the possibility that the successful clearance of latently infected cells may be masked by a larger and variable pool of cells with defective proviruses. These defective proviruses are detected by PCR but may not be affected by reactivation strategies and may not require eradication to accomplish an effective cure. A molecular understanding of the discrepancy between infected cell frequencies measured by viral outgrowth versus PCR assays is an urgent priority in HIV-1 cure research.
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Raltegravir treatment intensification does not alter cerebrospinal fluid HIV-1 infection or immunoactivation in subjects on suppressive therapy.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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Despite suppression of plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA by antiretroviral therapy to levels below clinical assay detection, infection and immune activation may persist within the central nervous system and possibly lead to continued brain injury. We hypothesized that intensifying therapy would decrease cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infection and immune activation.
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Treatment intensification with raltegravir in subjects with sustained HIV-1 viraemia suppression: a randomized 48-week study.
Antivir. Ther. (Lond.)
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Residual viraemia is a major obstacle to HIV-1 eradication in subjects receiving HAART. The intensification with raltegravir could impact latent reservoirs and might lead to a reduction of plasma HIV-1 viraemia (viral load [VL]), complementary DNA intermediates and immune activation.
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A randomized, controlled trial of raltegravir intensification in antiretroviral-treated, HIV-infected patients with a suboptimal CD4+ T cell response.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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Some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are not able to achieve a normal CD4(+) T cell count despite prolonged, treatment-mediated viral suppression. We conducted an intensification study to assess whether residual viral replication contributes to replenishment of the latent reservoir and whether mucosal HIV-specific T cell responses limit the reservoir size.
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Can HIV infection be eradicated through use of potent antiviral agents?
Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2010
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This review focuses on recent advances in HIV research and therapy that seek to eradicate persistent HIV in patients on suppressive therapy.
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HIV-1 replication and immune dynamics are affected by raltegravir intensification of HAART-suppressed subjects.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
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Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) results in potent and durable suppression of HIV-1 viremia. However, HIV-1 replication resumes if therapy is interrupted. Although it is generally believed that active replication has been halted in individuals on HAART, immune activation and inflammation continue at abnormal levels, suggesting continued, low-level viral replication. To assess whether active replication might be driving immune activation in HAART, we examined the impact of treatment intensification with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir on viral complementary DNA and immune activation parameters. In the presence of raltegravir, linear HIV-1 cDNA is prevented from integrating into chromatin and is subsequently converted to episomal cDNAs. Raltegravir intensification of a three-drug suppressive HAART regimen resulted in a specific and transient increase in episomal DNAs in a large percentage of HAART-suppressed subjects. Furthermore, in subjects with these episomal DNAs, immune activation was higher at baseline and was subsequently normalized after raltegravir intensification. These results suggest that, despite suppressive HAART, active replication persists in some infected individuals and drives immune activation. The ability of raltegravir intensification to perturb the reservoir that supports active replication has implications for therapeutic strategies aimed at achieving viral eradication.
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HIV reservoirs, latency, and reactivation: prospects for eradication.
Antiviral Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2009
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Current antiretroviral therapy effectively suppresses but does not eradicate HIV-1 infection. During therapy patients maintain a persistent low-level viremia requiring lifelong adherence to antiretroviral therapies. This viremia may arise from latently infected reservoirs such as resting memory CD4+ T-cells or sanctuary sites where drug penetration is suboptimal. Understanding the mechanisms of HIV latency will help efforts to eradicate the infection. This review examines the dynamics of persistent viremia, viral reservoirs, the mechanisms behind viral latency, and methods to purge the viral reservoirs. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, vol. 85, issue 1, 2010.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.