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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reporting tumor molecular heterogeneity in histopathological diagnosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
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Detection of molecular tumor heterogeneity has become of paramount importance with the advent of targeted therapies. Analysis for detection should be comprehensive, timely and based on routinely available tumor samples.
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Multigene mutational profiling of cholangiocarcinomas identifies actionable molecular subgroups.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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One-hundred-fifty-three biliary cancers, including 70 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC), 57 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ECC) and 26 gallbladder carcinomas (GBC) were assessed for mutations in 56 genes using multigene next-generation sequencing. Expression of EGFR and mTOR pathway genes was investigated by immunohistochemistry. At least one mutated gene was observed in 118/153 (77%) cancers. The genes most frequently involved were KRAS (28%), TP53 (18%), ARID1A (12%), IDH1/2 (9%), PBRM1 (9%), BAP1 (7%), and PIK3CA (7%). IDH1/2 (p=0.0005) and BAP1 (p=0.0097) mutations were characteristic of ICC, while KRAS (p=0.0019) and TP53 (p=0.0019) were more frequent in ECC and GBC. Multivariate analysis identified tumour stage and TP53 mutations as independent predictors of survival. Alterations in chromatin remodeling genes (ARID1A, BAP1, PBRM1, SMARCB1) were seen in 31% of cases. Potentially actionable mutations were seen in 104/153 (68%) cancers: i) KRAS/NRAS/BRAF mutations were found in 34% of cancers; ii) mTOR pathway activation was documented by immunohistochemistry in 51% of cases and by mutations in mTOR pathway genes in 19% of cancers; iii) TGF-ß/Smad signaling was altered in 10.5% cancers; iv) mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors were found in 9% cases. Our study identified molecular subgroups of cholangiocarcinomas that can be explored for specific drug targeting in clinical trials.
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Clinical application of microRNA testing in neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.
Molecules
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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It is well documented that dysregulation of microRNAs is a hallmark of human cancers. Thus, this family of small non-coding regulatory molecules represents an excellent source of sensitive biomarkers. Unique microRNAs expression profiles have been associated with different types and subsets of gastrointestinal tumors including gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). GEP-NETs are a heterogeneous group of epithelial neoplasms with neuroendocrine differentiation. At present, early detection and surgical resection of GEP-NETs represent the best chance for a cure. Thus, clinically useful biomarkers for GEP-NETs that strongly correlate with early detection are urgently needed. The purpose of this review is to summarize the role of miRNAs in GEP-NET carcinogenesis and their possible use as novel diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers.
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Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma reveal epigenetic deregulation of SLIT-ROBO, ITGA2 and MET signaling.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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The importance of epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation in tumorigenesis is increasingly being appreciated. To define the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), we captured the methylation profiles of 167 untreated resected PDACs and compared them to a panel of 29 adjacent nontransformed pancreata using high-density arrays. A total of 11,634 CpG sites associated with 3,522 genes were significantly differentially methylated (DM) in PDAC and were capable of segregating PDAC from non-malignant pancreas, regardless of tumor cellularity. As expected, PDAC hypermethylation was most prevalent in the 5' region of genes (including the proximal promoter, 5'UTR and CpG islands). Approximately 33% DM genes showed significant inverse correlation with mRNA expression levels. Pathway analysis revealed an enrichment of aberrantly methylated genes involved in key molecular mechanisms important to PDAC: TGF-?, WNT, integrin signaling, cell adhesion, stellate cell activation and axon guidance. Given the recent discovery that SLIT-ROBO mutations play a clinically important role in PDAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of axon guidance was pursued in more detail. Bisulfite amplicon deep sequencing and qRT-PCR expression analyses confirmed recurrent perturbation of axon guidance pathway genes SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, ROBO3, ITGA2 and MET and suggests epigenetic suppression of SLIT-ROBO signaling and up-regulation of MET and ITGA2 expression. Hypomethylation of MET and ITGA2 correlated with high gene expression, which was associated with poor survival. These data suggest that aberrant methylation plays an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis affecting core signaling pathways with potential implications for the disease pathophysiology and therapy.
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MEN1 Gene Mutation and Reduced Expression Are Associated with Poor Prognosis in Pulmonary Carcinoids.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2013
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Context:MEN1 gene alterations have been implicated in lung carcinoids, but their effect on gene expression and disease outcome are unknown.Objective:To analyse MEN1 gene and expression anomalies in lung neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and their correlations with clinicopathologic data and disease outcome.Design:We examined 74 lung NENs including 58 carcinoids and 16 high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas (HGNECs) for MEN1 mutations (n=70) and allelic losses (n=69), promoter hypermethylation (n=65), and mRNA (n=74) expression. Results were correlated with disease outcome.Results:MEN1 mutations were found in 7/55 (13%) carcinoids and in 1 HGNEC, mostly associated with loss of the second allele. MEN1 decreased expression levels correlated with the presence of mutations (P=0.0060) and was also lower in HGNECs than carcinoids (P=0.0024). MEN1 methylation was not associated with mRNA expression levels. Patients with carcinoids harbouring MEN1 mutation and loss had shorter overall survival (P=0.039 and P=0.035, respectively), and low MEN1 mRNA levels correlated with distant metastasis (P=0.00010) and shorter survival (P=0.0071). In multivariate analysis, stage and MEN1 allelic loss were independent predictors of prognosis.Conclusion:Thirteen percent of pulmonary carcinoids harbour MEN1 mutation, associated with reduced mRNA expression and poor prognosis. Also in mutation-negative tumours, low MEN1 gene expression correlates with an adverse disease outcome. Hypermethylation was excluded as the underlying mechanism.
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Histomolecular phenotypes and outcome in adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of vater.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
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Individuals with adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater demonstrate a broad range of outcomes, presumably because these cancers may arise from any one of the three epithelia that converge at that location. This variability poses challenges for clinical decision making and the development of novel therapeutic strategies.
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DNA qualification workflow for next generation sequencing of histopathological samples.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Histopathological samples are a treasure-trove of DNA for clinical research. However, the quality of DNA can vary depending on the source or extraction method applied. Thus a standardized and cost-effective workflow for the qualification of DNA preparations is essential to guarantee interlaboratory reproducible results. The qualification process consists of the quantification of double strand DNA (dsDNA) and the assessment of its suitability for downstream applications, such as high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We tested the two most frequently used instrumentations to define their role in this process: NanoDrop, based on UV spectroscopy, and Qubit 2.0, which uses fluorochromes specifically binding dsDNA. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used as the reference technique as it simultaneously assesses DNA concentration and suitability for PCR amplification. We used 17 genomic DNAs from 6 fresh-frozen (FF) tissues, 6 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 3 cell lines, and 2 commercial preparations. Intra- and inter-operator variability was negligible, and intra-methodology variability was minimal, while consistent inter-methodology divergences were observed. In fact, NanoDrop measured DNA concentrations higher than Qubit and its consistency with dsDNA quantification by qPCR was limited to high molecular weight DNA from FF samples and cell lines, where total DNA and dsDNA quantity virtually coincide. In partially degraded DNA from FFPE samples, only Qubit proved highly reproducible and consistent with qPCR measurements. Multiplex PCR amplifying 191 regions of 46 cancer-related genes was designated the downstream application, using 40 ng dsDNA from FFPE samples calculated by Qubit. All but one sample produced amplicon libraries suitable for next-generation sequencing. NanoDrop UV-spectrum verified contamination of the unsuccessful sample. In conclusion, as qPCR has high costs and is labor intensive, an alternative effective standard workflow for qualification of DNA preparations should include the sequential combination of NanoDrop and Qubit to assess the purity and quantity of dsDNA, respectively.
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Src kinase activity coordinates cell adhesion and spreading with activation of mammalian target of rapamycin in pancreatic endocrine tumour cells.
Endocr. Relat. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and heterogeneous neoplasms, often diagnosed at metastatic stage, for which no cure is currently available. Recently, activation of two pathways that support proliferation and invasiveness of cancer cells, the Src family kinase (SFK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, was demonstrated in PETs. Since both pathways represent suitable targets for therapeutic intervention, we investigated their possible interaction in PETs. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses indicated that SFK and mTOR activity correlate in PET cell lines. We also found that SFKs coordinate cell adhesion and spreading with activation of the mTOR pathway in PET cells. Live cell metabolic labelling and biochemical studies demonstrated that SFK activity enhance mTOR-dependent translation initiation. Furthermore, microarray analysis of the mRNAs associated with polyribosomes revealed that SFKs regulate mTOR-dependent translation of specific transcripts, with an enrichment in mRNAs encoding cell cycle proteins. Importantly, a synergic inhibition of proliferation was observed in PET cells concomitantly treated with SFK and mTOR inhibitors, without activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pro-survival pathway. Tissue microarray analysis revealed activation of Src and mTOR in some PET samples, and identified phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 as an independent marker of poor prognosis in PETs. Thus, our work highlights a novel link between the SFK and mTOR pathways, which regulate the translation of mRNAs for cell cycle regulators, and suggest that crosstalk between these pathways promotes PET cell proliferation.
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Mutational profiling of kinases in human tumours of pancreatic origin identifies candidate cancer genes in ductal and ampulla of vater carcinomas.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2010
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Protein kinases are key regulators of cellular processes (such as proliferation, apoptosis and invasion) that are often deregulated in human cancers. Accordingly, kinase genes have been the first to be systematically analyzed in human tumors leading to the discovery that many oncogenes correspond to mutated kinases. In most cases the genetic alterations translate in constitutively active kinase proteins, which are amenable of therapeutic targeting. Tumours of the pancreas are aggressive neoplasms for which no effective therapeutic strategy is currently available.
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MEN1 in pancreatic endocrine tumors: analysis of gene and protein status in 169 sporadic neoplasms reveals alterations in the vast majority of cases.
Endocr. Relat. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2010
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Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) may be part of hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome. While MEN1 gene mutation is the only ascertained genetic anomaly described in PETs, no data exist on the cellular localization of MEN1-encoded protein, menin, in normal pancreas and PETs. A total of 169 PETs were used to assess the i) MEN1 gene mutational status in 100 clinically sporadic PETs by direct DNA sequencing, ii) immunohistochemical expression of menin in normal pancreas and 140 PETs, including 71 cases screened for gene mutations, and iii) correlation of these findings with clinical-pathological parameters. Twenty-seven PETs showed mutations that were somatic in 25 patients and revealed to be germline in 2 patients. Menin immunostaining showed strong nuclear and very faint cytoplasmic signal in normal islet cells, whereas it displayed abnormal location and expression levels in 80% of tumors. PETs harboring MEN1 truncating mutations lacked nuclear protein, and most PETs with MEN1 missense mutations showed a strong cytoplasmic positivity for menin. Menin was also misplaced in a significant number of cases lacking MEN1 mutations. In conclusion, the vast majority of PETs showed qualitative and/or quantitative alterations in menin localization. In 30% of cases, this was associated with MEN1 mutations affecting sequences involved in nuclear localization or protein-protein interaction. In cases lacking MEN1 mutations, the alteration of one of the menin interactors may have prevented its proper localization, as suggested by recent data showing that menin protein shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and also affects the subcellular localization of its interactors.
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Mutational profile of GNAQQ209 in human tumors.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2009
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Frequent somatic mutations have recently been identified in the ras-like domain of the heterotrimeric G protein alpha-subunit (GNAQ) in blue naevi 83%, malignant blue naevi (50%) and ocular melanoma of the uvea (46%). The mutations exclusively affect codon 209 and result in GNAQ constitutive activation which, in turn, acts as a dominant oncogene.
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Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.
Andrew V Biankin, Nicola Waddell, Karin S Kassahn, Marie-Claude Gingras, Lakshmi B Muthuswamy, Amber L Johns, David K Miller, Peter J Wilson, Ann-Marie Patch, Jianmin Wu, David K Chang, Mark J Cowley, Brooke B Gardiner, Sarah Song, Ivon Harliwong, Senel Idrisoglu, Craig Nourse, Ehsan Nourbakhsh, Suzanne Manning, Shivangi Wani, Milena Gongora, Marina Pajic, Christopher J Scarlett, Anthony J Gill, Andreia V Pinho, Ilse Rooman, Matthew Anderson, Oliver Holmes, Conrad Leonard, Darrin Taylor, Scott Wood, Qinying Xu, Katia Nones, J Lynn Fink, Angelika Christ, Tim Bruxner, Nicole Cloonan, Gabriel Kolle, Felicity Newell, Mark Pinese, R Scott Mead, Jeremy L Humphris, Warren Kaplan, Marc D Jones, Emily K Colvin, Adnan M Nagrial, Emily S Humphrey, Angela Chou, Venessa T Chin, Lorraine A Chantrill, Amanda Mawson, Jaswinder S Samra, James G Kench, Jessica A Lovell, Roger J Daly, Neil D Merrett, Christopher Toon, Krishna Epari, Nam Q Nguyen, Andrew Barbour, Nikolajs Zeps, , Nipun Kakkar, Fengmei Zhao, Yuan Qing Wu, Min Wang, Donna M Muzny, William E Fisher, F Charles Brunicardi, Sally E Hodges, Jeffrey G Reid, Jennifer Drummond, Kyle Chang, Yi Han, Lora R Lewis, Huyen Dinh, Christian J Buhay, Timothy Beck, Lee Timms, Michelle Sam, Kimberly Begley, Andrew Brown, Deepa Pai, Ami Panchal, Nicholas Buchner, Richard de Borja, Robert E Denroche, Christina K Yung, Stefano Serra, Nicole Onetto, Debabrata Mukhopadhyay, Ming-Sound Tsao, Patricia A Shaw, Gloria M Petersen, Steven Gallinger, Ralph H Hruban, Anirban Maitra, Christine A Iacobuzio-Donahue, Richard D Schulick, Christopher L Wolfgang, Richard A Morgan, Rita T Lawlor, Paola Capelli, Vincenzo Corbo, Maria Scardoni, Giampaolo Tortora, Margaret A Tempero, Karen M Mann, Nancy A Jenkins, Pedro A Pérez-Mancera, David J Adams, David A Largaespada, Lodewyk F A Wessels, Alistair G Rust, Lincoln D Stein, David A Tuveson, Neal G Copeland, Elizabeth A Musgrove, Aldo Scarpa, James R Eshleman, Thomas J Hudson, Robert L Sutherland, David A Wheeler, John V Pearson, John D McPherson, Richard A Gibbs, Sean M Grimmond.
Nature
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Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.
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Time-Qualified Patterns of Variation of PPAR?, DNMT1, and DNMT3B Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines.
PPAR Res
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Carcinogenesis is related to the loss of homeostatic control of cellular processes regulated by transcriptional circuits and epigenetic mechanisms. Among these, the activities of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are crucial and intertwined. PPAR? is a key regulator of cell fate, linking nutrient sensing to transcription processes, and its expression oscillates with circadian rhythmicity. Aim of our study was to assess the periodicity of PPAR? and DNMTs in pancreatic cancer (PC). We investigated the time-related patterns of PPARG, DNMT1, and DNMT3B expression monitoring their mRNA levels by qRT-PCR at different time points over a 28-hour span in BxPC-3, CFPAC-1, PANC-1, and MIAPaCa-2 PC cells after synchronization with serum shock. PPARG and DNMT1 expression in PANC-1 cells and PPARG expression in MIAPaCa-2 cells were characterized by a 24?h period oscillation, and a borderline significant rhythm was observed for the PPARG, DNMT1, and DNMT3B expression profiles in the other cell lines. The time-qualified profiles of gene expression showed different shapes and phase relationships in the PC cell lines examined. In conclusion, PPARG and DNMTs expression is characterized by different time-qualified patterns in cell lines derived from human PC, and this heterogeneity could influence cell phenotype and human disease behaviour.
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Molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer: from bench-to-bedside translation.
Curr Drug Targets
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Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (referred here as pancreatic cancer) is a lethal disease with the worst prognosis among all solid tumors. Surgical resection represents the only hope for cure but it is possible only in patients that present with local disease (about 20% of cases). Whether dismal prognosis of pancreatic cancer is a result of late diagnosis or early dissemination to distant organ is still a debate. Moreover, this disease shows an intrinsic chemotherapeutic resistance that has been mainly ascribed to the presence of a dense stromal reaction that significantly impairs drugs delivery. Clinical management of pancreatic cancer patients relies on few molecular markers (e.g., the diagnostic marker CA19-9) that, however, present several limitations to their use. The clinical usefulness of somatic alterations in well-characterized genes (such as KRAS and TP53), whose detection is technically feasible in different biological samples, has been extensively investigated leading to inconsistent results. Furthermore, none of the candidate molecular markers identified in recent years has shown an appropriate clinical performance and therefore none is routinely used. This depicts a scenario where the identification of novel and effective clinical biomarkers is mandatory. Very recent genome-wide comprehensive studies have shed light on the high degree of genetic complexity and heterogeneity of the pancreatic cancers. Although far from being introduced into the clinical settings, results from those studies are expected to change definitively the perspective through which we look at the clinical management of pancreatic cancer patients towards a personalized cancer medicine.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.