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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Identification of tribbles-1 as a novel binding partner of Foxp3 in regulatory T cells.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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In a previous study, we identified TRIB1, a serine-threonine kinase-like molecule, as a biomarker of chronic antibody-mediated rejection of human kidneys when measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we focused our analysis on a specific subset of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that play a dominant role in regulating immune responses in health and disease, so-called CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We isolated both human and murine Treg and non-Treg counterparts and analyzed TRIB1 and Foxp3 mRNA expression by quantitative PCR on the freshly isolated cells or following 24 h of activation. Physical interaction between the human TRIB1 and Foxp3 proteins was analyzed in live cell lines by protein complementation assay using both flow cytometry and microscopy and confirmed in primary freshly isolated human CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD127(-) Tregs by co-immunoprecipitation. Both TRIB1 and Foxp3 were expressed at significantly higher levels in Tregs than in their CD4(+)CD25(-) counterparts (p < 0.001). Moreover, TRIB1 and Foxp3 mRNA levels correlated tightly in Tregs (Spearman r = 1.0; p < 0.001, n = 7), but not in CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. The protein complementation assay revealed a direct physical interaction between TRIB1 and Foxp3 in live cells. This interaction was impaired upon deletion of the TRIB1 N-terminal but not the C-terminal domain, suggesting an interaction in the nucleus. This direct interaction within the nucleus was confirmed in primary human Tregs by co-immunoprecipitation. These data show a direct relationship between TRIB1 and Foxp3 in terms of their expression and physical interaction and highlight Tribbles-1 as a novel binding partner of Foxp3 in Tregs.
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Polyploidization without mitosis improves in vivo liver transduction with lentiviral vectors.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles for therapeutic and research applications. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, they are able to infect most nonproliferating cells. In the liver, induction of cell proliferation dramatically improved hepatocyte transduction using all types of retroviral vectors. However, the precise relationship between hepatocyte division and transduction efficiency has not been determined yet. Here we compared gene transfer efficiency in the liver after in vivo injection of recombinant lentiviral or Moloney murine leukemia viral (MoMuLV) vectors in hepatectomized rats treated or not with retrorsine, an alkaloid that blocks hepatocyte division and induces megalocytosis. Partial hepatectomy alone resulted in a similar increase in hepatocyte transduction using either vector. In retrorsine-treated and partially hepatectomized rats, transduction with MoMuLV vectors dropped dramatically. In contrast, we observed that retrorsine treatment combined with partial hepatectomy increased lentiviral transduction to higher levels than hepatectomy alone. Analysis of nuclear ploidy in single cells showed that a high level of transduction was associated with polyploidization. In conclusion, endoreplication could be exploited to improve the efficiency of liver-directed lentiviral gene therapy.
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Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy for metabolic diseases: an update.
Curr. Pharm. Des.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2011
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Retroviral vectors have been used for several decades for the transfer of therapeutic genes to various cells or organs including the liver. Initial studies aimed at treating inherited liver deficiencies were carried out with murine oncoretroviral vectors either delivered directly to the organ or using an ex vivo strategy that entailed harvest of the hepatocytes, transduction during a culture phase and further reinfusion to the patient. However, although a clinical trial was performed in the early 1990s, a complete cure of animal models of metabolic diseases was rarely achieved. The advent of lentiviral vectors derived from HIV1 profoundly changed the field and this vector type now appears to be of the most attractive for liver directed gene therapy. Indeed, lentiviral vectors do not require complete cell division to transduce the target cells. There are however still bottlenecks that limit the clinical development of gene therapy using retroviral vectors. In the present review we will specifically focus on specific aspects such as the risk of insertional mutagenesis, the potential requirement of cell cycle activation to enhance transduction and the major issue of an immune response directed against the transgene as well as some specific aspects of ex vivo gene transfer. Finally we will briefly consider the future developments of these vectors made possible by the availability of new techniques in cell and molecular biology.
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Transient increase in intrahepatic pressure mediates successful treatment of the Gunn rat with reduced doses of lentiviral vector.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2010
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Lentiviral vectors can stably transduce hepatocytes and are promising tools for gene therapy of hepatic diseases. Although hepatocytes are accessible to blood-borne viral vectors through fenestrations of the hepatic endothelium, improved liver transduction after delivery of vectors to the blood stream is needed. As the normal endothelial fenestration and lentiviral vectors are similar in size (150 nm), we hypothesized that a transient increase in hepatic blood pressure may enhance in vivo gene transfer to hepatocytes. We designed a simple surgical procedure, by which the liver is temporarily excluded from blood flow. Lentiviral vectors were injected in a large volume to increase intrahepatic pressure. We demonstrated that in the Gunn rat, a model of Crigler-Najjar disease, the administration of low vector doses (corresponding to a multiplicity of infection of 0.2) by this procedure resulted in therapeutic correction of hyperbilirubinemia, without toxicity. The correction was sustained for 10 months (end of study). The same vector amounts yielded only partial correction after intraportal delivery. We believe that this new and clinically applicable strategy may broaden the range of genetic liver diseases accessible to gene therapy.
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Lentiviral vectors that express UGT1A1 in liver and contain miR-142 target sequences normalize hyperbilirubinemia in Gunn rats.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2010
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Crigler-Najjar type 1 (CN-I) is an inherited liver disease caused by an absence of bilirubin-uridine 5-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT1A1) activity. It results in life-threatening levels of unconjugated bilirubin, and therapeutic options are limited. We used adult Gunn rats (an animal model of the disease) to evaluate the efficiency of lentiviral-based gene therapy to express UGT1A1 in liver.
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Transient expression of genes delivered to newborn rat liver using recombinant adeno-associated virus 2/8 vectors.
J Gene Med
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2009
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In vivo adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery to adult liver results in sustained expression of the transgene. However, it has been suggested that AAV delivery to the newborn liver may result in transient expression. In the present study, we analysed transgene expression after AAV8 delivery of a therapeutic or a marker gene to newborn rat liver.
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A new surgical approach to improve gene transfer in liver using lentiviral vectors.
J. Pediatr. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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Metabolic inherited liver diseases are attractive targets for gene therapy. Recombinant lentiviruses are very powerful viral vectors able to infect nonmitotic cells. We wanted to develop a new surgical approach to improve gene transfer in adult liver using low viral doses.
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Direct in vivo cell lineage analysis in the retrorsine and 2AAF models of liver injury after genetic labeling in adult and newborn rats.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2009
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When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver regeneration proceeds from the division of non parenchymal hepatocyte progenitors. Oval cells and Small Hepatocyte-like Progenitor Cells (SHPCs) represent the two most studied examples of such epithelial cells with putative stem cell capacity. In the present study we wished to compare the origin of SHPCs proliferating after retrorsine administration to the one of oval cells observed after 2-Acetyl-Amino fluorene (2-AAF) treatment.
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Specific micro RNA-regulated TetR-KRAB transcriptional control of transgene expression in viral vector-transduced cells.
PLoS ONE
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Precise control of transgene expression in a tissue-specific and temporally regulated manner is desirable for many basic and applied investigations gene therapy applications. This is important to regulate dose of transgene products and minimize unwanted effects. Previously described methods have employed tissue specific promoters, miRNA-based transgene silencing or tetR-KRAB-mediated suppression of transgene promoters. To improve on versatility of transgene expression control, we have developed expression systems that use combinations of a tetR-KRAB artificial transgene-repressor, endogenous miRNA silencing machinery and tissue specific promoters. Precise control of transgene expression was demonstrated in liver-, macrophage- and muscle-derived cells. Efficiency was also demonstrated in vivo in murine muscle. This multicomponent and modular regulatory system provides a robust and easily adaptable method for achieving regulated transgene expression in different tissue types. The improved precision of regulation will be useful for many gene therapy applications requiring specific spatiotemporal transgene regulation.
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Priming of hepatocytes enhances in vivo liver transduction with lentiviral vectors in adult mice.
Hum Gene Ther Methods
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Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for liver disease gene therapy, because they can achieve protracted expression of transgenes in hepatocytes. However, the question as to whether cell division is required for optimal hepatocyte transduction has still not been completely answered. Liver gene-transfer efficiency after in vivo administration of recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of a liver-specific promoter in mice that were either hepatectomized or treated with cholic acid or phenobarbital was compared. Phenobarbital is known as a weak inducer of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas cholic acid has no direct effect on the cell cycle. This study shows that cholic acid is able to prime hepatocytes without mitosis induction. Both phenobarbital and cholic acid significantly increased hepatocyte transduction six- to ninefold, although cholic acid did not modify the mitotic index or cell-cycle entry. However, the effect of either compound was weaker than that observed after partial hepatectomy. In no cases was there a correlation between the expression of cell-cycle marker and transduction efficiency. We conclude that priming of hepatocytes should be considered a clinically applicable strategy to enhance in vivo liver gene therapy with lentiviral vectors.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.