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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The influence of heterocyclic compound-PAMAM dendrimer complexes on evoked electrical responses in slices of hypoxic brain tissue.
Cell. Mol. Biol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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We used complexes between a fourth generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and one of two heterocyclic compounds - 1-(6-hydroxyhexyl)-3-(5-phenyl-isoxazole-3-yl)-urea or 5-phenyl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid - to reduce oxygen consumption in transverse slices of the hippocampus taken from 4-week old male rats. In vitro electrophysiological experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect of the hypoxic state on the evoked responses was enhanced in the presence of the complexes. The data were analyzed in terms of the potential antitumor effects of these complexes.
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Lipopolysaccharide-induced neuronal activation in the paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamus depends on ambient temperature.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is associated with either fever or hypothermia, but the mechanisms responsible for switching from one to the other are unknown. In experimental animals, systemic inflammation is often induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To identify the diencephalic and brainstem structures involved in the fever-hypothermia switch, we studied the expression of c-Fos protein, a marker of neuronal activation, in rats treated with the same high dose of LPS (0.5 mg/kg, intravenously) either in a thermoneutral (30 °C) or cool (24 °C) environment. At 30 °C, LPS caused fever; at 24 °C, the same dose caused profound hypothermia. Both fever and hypothermia were associated with the induction of c-Fos in many brain areas, including several structures of the anterior preoptic, paraventricular, lateral, and dorsal hypothalamus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the posterior pretectal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, lateral parabrachial nucleus, area postrema, and nucleus of the solitary tract. Every brain area studied showed a comparable response to LPS at the two different ambient temperatures used, with the exception of two areas: the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), which we studied together with the adjacent dorsal hypothalamic area (DA), and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). Both structures had much stronger c-Fos expression during LPS hypothermia than during fever. We propose that PVH and DMH/DA neurons are involved in a circuit, which - depending on the ambient temperature - determines whether the thermoregulatory response to bacterial LPS will be fever or hypothermia.
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NT-ProBNP levels, water and sodium homeostasis in healthy men: effects of 7 days of dry immersion.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2011
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Immersion is a useful tool for studying fluid-volume homeostasis. Natriuretic peptides play a vital role in renal, humoral, and cardiovascular regulation under changing environmental conditions. We hypothesized that dry immersion would rapidly induce a new steady state for water and sodium metabolism, and that serum NT-proBNP levels, a proxy measure for brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), would decrease during long-term dry immersion and increase during recovery. Eight healthy young men were studied before, during, and after 7 days of dry immersion. Body weight, water balance, and plasma volume changes were evaluated. Plasma and serum samples were analyzed for active renin, NT-proBNP, aldosterone, electrolytes, osmolality, total protein, and creatinine. Urine samples were analyzed to determine levels of electrolytes, osmolality, creatinine, and free cortisol. A stand test was performed before and after dry immersion to evaluate cardiovascular deconditioning. Long-term dry immersion induced acute changes in water and sodium homeostasis on day 1, followed by a new steady state. Plasma volume decreased significantly during dry immersion. The serum levels of NT-proBNP increased significantly in recovery (10 ± 3 ng/L before dry immersion vs. 26 ± 5 ng/L on the fourth recovery day). Heart rate in the standing position was significantly greater after immersion. Results suggest that chronic dry immersion rapidly induced a new level of water-electrolyte homeostasis. The increase in NT-proBNP levels during the recovery period may be related to greater cardiac work and might reflect the degree of cardiovascular deconditioning.
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Naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of lipopolysaccharide- and Escherichia coli-induced systemic inflammation.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
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The natural switch from fever to hypothermia observed in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation is a phenomenon that continues to puzzle clinicians and scientists. The present study was the first to evaluate in direct experiments how the development of hypothermia vs. fever during severe forms of systemic inflammation impacts the pathophysiology of this malady and mortality rates in rats. Following administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 or 18 mg/kg) or of a clinical Escherichia coli isolate (5 × 10(9) or 1 × 10(10) CFU/kg), hypothermia developed in rats exposed to a mildly cool environment, but not in rats exposed to a warm environment; only fever was revealed in the warm environment. Development of hypothermia instead of fever suppressed endotoxemia in E. coli-infected rats, but not in LPS-injected rats. The infiltration of the lungs by neutrophils was similarly suppressed in E. coli-infected rats of the hypothermic group. These potentially beneficial effects came with costs, as hypothermia increased bacterial burden in the liver. Furthermore, the hypotensive responses to LPS or E. coli were exaggerated in rats of the hypothermic group. This exaggeration, however, occurred independently of changes in inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins. Despite possible costs, development of hypothermia lessened abdominal organ dysfunction and reduced overall mortality rates in both the E. coli and LPS models. By demonstrating that naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of aseptic (LPS-induced) or septic (E. coli-induced) systemic inflammation, this study provides new grounds for the management of this deadly condition.
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Improved cellular specificity of plasmonic nanobubbles versus nanoparticles in heterogeneous cell systems.
PLoS ONE
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The limited specificity of nanoparticle (NP) uptake by target cells associated with a disease is one of the principal challenges of nanomedicine. Using the threshold mechanism of plasmonic nanobubble (PNB) generation and enhanced accumulation and clustering of gold nanoparticles in target cells, we increased the specificity of PNB generation and detection in target versus non-target cells by more than one order of magnitude compared to the specificity of NP uptake by the same cells. This improved cellular specificity of PNBs was demonstrated in six different cell models representing diverse molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor, CD3 receptor, prostate specific membrane antigen and mucin molecule MUC1. Thus PNBs may be a universal method and nano-agent that overcome the problem of non-specific uptake of NPs by non-target cells and improve the specificity of NP-based diagnostics, therapeutics and theranostics at the cell level.
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Cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs and heterocyclic compounds at application on the cells of primary culture of neuroepithelium tumors.
Med Chem
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Neuroepithelial tumor cells were cultured in vitro. The biopsy material was taken from 93 children at removal of the brain tumors during neurosurgical operations. The individual features of the cells sensitivity of primary cultures in respect to protocol-approved chemotherapy drugs and changes in the Interleukin-6 (Il-6) level in the culture medium after the application of chemotherapy were established. The initial level of Il-6 exceeded 600.0 pg/ml in the cultural medium with histologically verified pilomyxoid astrocytoma cells, and ranged from 100.0 to 200.0 pg/ml in the medium at cultivation of ganglioneuroblastoma and pilocytic astrocytoma. A decrease in the Il-6 level in the medium culture of primary tumors cells was observed after the application of chemotherapeutic agents on the cells of pilomyxoid astrocytoma, astrocytomas, and pilocytic desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma. The production of Il-6 increased after application of cytostatic drugs on the cells of oligoastrocytomas. A decrease in Il-6 level after application of Cisplatin and Methotrexate and a 5-10 fold increase in the level of Il-6 after application of Etoposide, Carboplatin, Cytarabine, and Gemcitabine were registered in the medium with ganglioneuroblastoma. To improve the cytotoxic action of chemotherapeutic agents, the combined application of cytostatics with heterocyclic compounds was carried out. A computer modeling of ligand-protein complexes of carbamide using the Dock 6.4 and USF Chimera program packages was performed with molecular mechanics method. Special attention was drawn to the ability of several isoxazole heterocycles and isothiazolyl to inhibit the tyrosine kinase. It was proved in vitro that the joint application of chemotherapeutic agents and heterocyclic compounds could reduce the concentration of the cytostatic factor by 10 or more times, having maintained the maximum cytotoxic effect. It was assumed that the target amplification of cytotoxic action of chemotherapeutic agents had prospects for reducing toxic side effects of chemotherapy in vivo, which would be carried out only after the preclinical studies.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.