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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
2-epi-5-epi-Valiolone synthase activity is essential for maintaining phycobilisome composition in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 when grown in the presence of a carbon source.
Photosyn. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2013
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The cyclase 2-epi-5-epi-valiolone synthase (EVS) is reported to be a key enzyme for biosynthesis of the mycosporine-like amino acid shinorine in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. Subsequently, we demonstrated that an in-frame complete deletion of the EVS gene had little effect on in vivo production of shinorine. Complete segregation of the EVS gene deletion mutant proved difficult and was achieved only when the mutant was grown in the dark and in a medium supplemented with fructose. The segregated mutant showed a striking colour change from native blue-green to pale yellow-green, corresponding to substantial loss of the photosynthetic pigment phycocyanin, as evinced by combinations of absorbance and emission spectra. Transcriptional analysis of the mutant grown in the presence of fructose under dark or light conditions revealed downregulation of the cpcA gene that encodes the alpha subunit of phycocyanin, whereas the gene encoding nblA, a protease chaperone essential for phycobilisome degradation, was not expressed. We propose that the substrate of EVS (sedoheptulose 7-phosphate) or possibly lack of its EVS-downstream products, represses transcription of cpcA to exert a hitherto unknown control over photosynthesis in this cyanobacterium. The significance of this finding is enhanced by phylogenetic analyses revealing horizontal gene transfer of the EVS gene of cyanobacteria to fungi and dinoflagellates. It is also conceivable that the EVS gene has been transferred from dinoflagellates, as evident in the host genome of symbiotic corals. A role of EVS in regulating sedoheptulose 7-phosphate concentrations in the photophysiology of coral symbiosis is yet to be determined.
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Proteomic characterisation of toxins isolated from nematocysts of the South Atlantic jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis.
Toxicon
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Surprisingly little is known of the toxic arsenal of cnidarian nematocysts compared to other venomous animals. Here we investigate the toxins of nematocysts isolated from the jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis. A total of 29 unique ms/ms events were annotated as potential toxins homologous to the toxic proteins from diverse animal phyla, including cone-snails, snakes, spiders, scorpions, wasp, bee, parasitic worm and other Cnidaria. Biological activities of these potential toxins include cytolysins, neurotoxins, phospholipases and toxic peptidases. The presence of several toxic enzymes is intriguing, such as sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase B (SMase B) that has only been described in certain spider venoms, and a prepro-haystatin P-IIId snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) that activates coagulation factor X, which is very rare even in snake venoms. Our annotation reveals sequence orthologs to many representatives of the most important superfamilies of peptide venoms suggesting that their origins in higher organisms arise from deep eumetazoan innovations. Accordingly, cnidarian venoms may possess unique biological properties that might generate new leads in the discovery of novel pharmacologically active drugs.
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KEGG orthology-based annotation of the predicted proteome of Acropora digitifera: ZoophyteBase - an open access and searchable database of a coral genome.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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Contemporary coral reef research has firmly established that a genomic approach is urgently needed to better understand the effects of anthropogenic environmental stress and global climate change on coral holobiont interactions. Here we present KEGG orthology-based annotation of the complete genome sequence of the scleractinian coral Acropora digitifera and provide the first comprehensive view of the genome of a reef-building coral by applying advanced bioinformatics.
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Hepatic coenzyme Q redox balance of fishes as a potential bioindicator of environmental contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
Biol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2010
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In this communication, we introduce a novel biomarker of aquatic contamination based on the xenobiotic-induced response of the hepatic coenzyme Q (CoQ) redox balance of fishes to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The method is demonstrated by comparing changes in the liver CoQ redox balance with that measured using the CYP1A-based, 7-ethoxyresofurin-O-deethylase activity assay, on administration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and ?-naphthoflavone (BNF) to Barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Both assays showed comparable dose-dependent effects in fish treated with BaP or BNF. Perturbation in the constitutive hepatic CoQ redox balance of fishes may thus provide a simple biomarker of aquatic PAH contamination.
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Gene expression in the scleractinian Acropora microphthalma exposed to high solar irradiance reveals elements of photoprotection and coral bleaching.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2010
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The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH) from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues.
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Vitamin E protection in the biochemical adaptation of marine organisms to cold-water environments.
Comp. Biochem. Physiol. B, Biochem. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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Vitamin E is one of the most important lipid-soluble antioxidants to occur in plants and animals for cellular protection against lipid peroxidation. An essential adaptation to low temperature is the elaboration of high levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the composition of cellular membranes, which is necessary to maintain functional membrane fluidity. Increasing the content of lipid unsaturation, however, occurs at the expense of enhancing the vulnerability of cellular membranes to oxidative damage. First isolated from salmon eggs, cold-water marine organisms were found to produce, or acquire, a specific vitamin E homologue, named "marine-derived tocopherol" (MDT), having an unusual methylene unsaturation at its isoprenoid-chain terminus. In this overview we compare the antioxidant composition of tropical, temperate and polar fishes, present provisional evidence that MDT is produced at the primary food chain, and provide empirical confirmation that the enhanced reactivity of MDT at low temperature is attributed to its greater rate of diffusion in viscous lipids at low temperatures. This claim of biochemical adaptation is supported by a unique model of diffusion-limited reactivity that mimics changes in the ratio of the MDT/alpha-tocopherol rate constants at diminishing levels of radical flux in viscous media at low temperature. We offer in conclusion future outlooks to research on antioxidant protection in cold-water ectotherms.
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Global genome analysis of the shikimic acid pathway reveals greater gene loss in host-associated than in free-living bacteria.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
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A central tenet in biochemistry for over 50 years has held that microorganisms, plants and, more recently, certain apicomplexan parasites synthesize essential aromatic compounds via elaboration of a complete shikimic acid pathway, whereas metazoans lacking this pathway require a dietary source of these compounds. The large number of sequenced bacterial and archaean genomes now available for comparative genomic analyses allows the fundamentals of this contention to be tested in prokaryotes. Using Hidden Markov Model profiles (HMM profiles) to identify all known enzymes of the pathway, we report the presence of genes encoding shikimate pathway enzymes in the hypothetical proteomes constructed from the genomes of 488 sequenced prokaryotes.
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Ockhams razor gone blunt: coenzyme Q adaptation and redox balance in tropical reef fishes.
Biol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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The ubiquitous coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a powerful antioxidant defence against cellular oxidative damage. In fishes, differences in the isoprenoid length of CoQ and its associated antioxidant efficacy have been proposed as an adaptation to different thermal environments. Here, we examine this broad contention by a comparison of the CoQ composition and its redox status in a range of coral reef fishes. Contrary to expectations, most species possessed CoQ(8) and their hepatic redox balance was mostly found in the reduced form. These elevated concentrations of the ubiquinol antioxidant are indicative of a high level of protection required against oxidative stress. We propose that, in contrast to the current paradigm, CoQ variation in coral reef fishes is not a generalized adaptation to thermal conditions, but reflects species-specific ecological habits and physiological constraints associated with oxygen demand.
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A profile of an endosymbiont-enriched fraction of the coral Stylophora pistillata reveals proteins relevant to microbial-host interactions.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
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This study examines the response of Symbiodinium sp. endosymbionts from the coral Stylophora pistillata to moderate levels of thermal "bleaching" stress, with and without trace metal limitation. Using quantitative high throughput proteomics, we identified 8098 MS/MS events relating to individual peptides from the endosymbiont-enriched fraction, including 109 peptides meeting stringent criteria for quantification, of which only 26 showed significant change in our experimental treatments; 12 of 26 increased expression in response to thermal stress with little difference affected by iron limitation. Surprisingly, there were no significant increases in antioxidant or heat stress proteins; those induced to higher expression were generally involved in protein biosynthesis. An outstanding exception was a massive 114-fold increase of a viral replication protein indicating that thermal stress may substantially increase viral load and thereby contribute to the etiology of coral bleaching and disease. In the absence of a sequenced genome for Symbiodinium or other photosymbiotic dinoflagellate, this proteome reveals a plethora of proteins potentially involved in microbial-host interactions. This includes photosystem proteins, DNA repair enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, metabolic redox enzymes, heat shock proteins, globin hemoproteins, proteins of nitrogen metabolism, and a wide range of viral proteins associated with these endosymbiont-enriched samples. Also present were 21 unusual peptide/protein toxins thought to originate from either microbial consorts or from contamination by coral nematocysts. Of particular interest are the proteins of apoptosis, vesicular transport, and endo/exocytosis, which are discussed in context of the cellular processes of coral bleaching. Notably, the protein complement provides evidence that, rather than being expelled by the host, stressed endosymbionts may mediate their own departure.
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Redundant pathways of sunscreen biosynthesis in a cyanobacterium.
Chembiochem
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Route of the sun block: according to empirical evidence, sun-screening mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in Eukarya originate from the shikimic acid pathway, whereas in cyanobacteria, biosynthesis of the MAA shinorine reportedly occurs through the pentose phosphate pathway. However, gene deletion shows that the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29143 does not biosynthesise shinorine exclusively by this route.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.