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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
High frequency of Tropheryma whipplei in culture-negative endocarditis.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-30-2011
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"Classical" Whipples disease (cWD) is caused by Tropheryma whipplei and is characterized by arthropathy, weight loss, and diarrhea. T. whipplei infectious endocarditis (TWIE) is rarely reported, either in the context of cWD or as isolated TWIE without signs of systemic infection. The frequency of TWIE is unknown, and systematic studies are lacking. Here, we performed an observational cohort study on the incidence of T. whipplei infection in explanted heart valves in two German university centers. Cardiac valves from 1,135 patients were analyzed for bacterial infection using conventional culture techniques, PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, and subsequent sequencing. T. whipplei-positive heart valves were confirmed by specific PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, histological examination, and culture for T. whipplei. Bacterial endocarditis was diagnosed in 255 patients, with streptococci, staphylococci, and enterococci being the main pathogens. T. whipplei was the fourth most frequent pathogen, found in 16 (6.3%) cases, and clearly outnumbered Bartonella quintana, Coxiella burnetii, and members of the HACEK group (Haemophilus species, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae). In this cohort, T. whipplei was the most commonly found pathogen associated with culture-negative infective endocarditis.
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Detection of "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" in two patients with severe febrile illnesses: evidence for a European sequence variant.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2010
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Recently, a new genus of Anaplasmataceae termed "Candidatus Neoehrlichia" was discovered in ticks and rodents. Here, we report on two patients who suffered from febrile bacteremia due to "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" associated with thrombotic or hemorrhagic events. 16S rRNA and groEL gene sequencing provided evidence of three groups of sequence variants.
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Oropharyngeal tularemia--a differential diagnosis of tonsillopharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis.
Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2010
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Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, has been recognized as a human and zoonotic pathogen for almost 100 years. The increasing number of tularemia outbreaks in regions of Europe outside the classic endemic areas in recent years has prompted renewed interest in this rare infectious disease. We report on a case of oropharyngeal tularemia in an 18-year-old girl from Bavaria (Germany) who presented with tonsillopharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis. Strongly positive serological tests and PCR detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in lymph node tissue led to the diagnosis of tularemia. After long-term treatment with doxycycline, partly in combination with ciprofloxacin, the patient recovered completely. Clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and recent epidemiological aspects of tularemia in Europe are discussed in this case report and review of the literature.
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In vivo detection of mucosal healing-involved histiocytes by confocal laser endomicroscopy.
World J. Gastroenterol.
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Histiocytes have a pivotal role in wound repair and intestinal epithelial recovery - the most important goal to sustain gut functionality. Yet, an in vivo description of colonic histiocytes by confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is missing. Here, we report the case of a 45-years-old male patient who was referred to our clinic with weight loss and a history of two consecutive Clostridium difficile colitis episodes, the latter cured 3 wk before present admission. Stool microbiology was negative. Conventional colonoscopy showed atrophy and a light mucosal oedema in the distal colon. During on-going endoscopy, we performed a fluorescein-aided CLE which revealed large polygonal (histiocytes-like) cells with copious cytoplasm and large nuclei in the lamina propria of the sigmoid colon as well as regenerative epithelial changes. Histopathological assessment of biopsies from the same areas confirmed the endomicroscopical findings: Periodic acid-Schiff- and CD68-positive foamy histiocytes in the colonic lamina propria and an advanced epithelial recovery. Since stool microbiology was repeatedly negative and polymerase chain reaction-analysis from colonic biopsies could not detect any mRNA for Thropheryma whippleii and common pathogens, we interpreted this particular setting as a mucosal healing process after consecutive Clostridium difficile infections. In conclusion, by describing these colonic histiocytes, we highlight the clinical usefulness of CLE in describing the entity of histiocytes in vivo and in real-time during the process of post-infectious mucosal healing in the colon.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.