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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quantification of viral proteins of the avian H7 subtype of influenza virus: an isotope dilution mass spectrometry method applicable for producing more rapid vaccines in the case of an influenza pandemic.
Anal. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza and its serious complications. Influenza viral strains undergo rapid mutations of the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) requiring vaccines to be frequently updated to include current circulating strains. It is nearly impossible to predict which strains will be circulating in the next influenza season. It is, therefore, imperative that the process of producing a vaccine be streamlined and as swift as possible. We have developed an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) method to quantify HA and NA in H7N7, H7N2, and H7N9 influenza. The IDMS method involves enzymatic digestion of viral proteins and the specific detection of evolutionarily conserved target peptides. The four target peptides that were initially chosen for analysis of the HA protein of H7N2 and H7N7 subtypes were conserved and available for analysis of the H7N9 subtype that circulated in China in the spring of 2013. Thus, rapid response to the potential pandemic was realized. Quantification of a protein is performed by employing multiple peptides to ensure that the enzymatic digestion of the protein is efficient in the region of the target peptides, verify the accuracy of the measurement, and provide flexibility in the case of amino acid changes among newly emerging strains. The IDMS method is an accurate, sensitive, and selective method to quantify the amount of HA and NA antigens in primary liquid standards, crude allantoic fluid, purified virus samples, and final vaccine presentations.
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Extraction and inhibition of enzymatic activity of botulinum neurotoxins /B1, /B2, /B3, /B4, and /B5 by a panel of monoclonal anti-BoNT/B antibodies.
BMC Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2011
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Botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), extremely toxic proteins which can induce respiratory failure leading to long-term intensive care or death. Treatment for botulism includes administration of antitoxins, which must be administered early in the course of the intoxication; therefore, rapid determination of human exposure to BoNT is an important public health goal. In previous work, our laboratory reported on Endopep-MS, a mass spectrometry-based activity method for detecting and differentiating BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F in clinical samples. We also demonstrated that antibody-capture is effective for purification and concentration of BoNTs from complex matrices such as clinical samples. However, some antibodies inhibit or neutralize the enzymatic activity of BoNT, so the choice of antibody for toxin extraction is critical.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.