JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Steps measured by pedometry and the relationship to adiposity in college women.
J Phys Act Health
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between steps per day and adiposity among college women.
Related JoVE Video
Steps Measured by Pedometry and the Relationship to Adiposity in College Women.
J Phys Act Health
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between steps per day and adiposity among college women. Methods: This study was cross-sectional and included women ages 18-25. Participants wore a pedometer for seven consecutive days. Body composition was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were assessed. Results: The women took 10,119 ± 2,836 steps per day. When divided into quartiles by steps, the top two quartiles of women in the study had significantly lower BMI, percent body fat, and waist and hip circumferences than the bottom quartile of women (P ? 0.05). Percent body fat was different between the bottom two quartiles and the top two quartiles (P ? 0.05). The odds of having a body fat of greater than 32% were reduced by 21.9% for every increase of 1,000 steps taken per day (P ? 0.05). Conclusions: Steps per day are related to body composition in young adult women, but this relationship weakens with progressively higher step counts. A reasonable recommendation for steps in young adult women that is associated with the lowest BMIs and body fat seems to be between 10,000 and 12,000 steps per day.
Related JoVE Video
Population growth of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, under varying levels of predator exclusion.
J. Insect Sci.
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), has caused economic damage in several Midwestern states, growers in Missouri have experienced relatively minor damage. To evaluate whether existing predatory insect populations are capable of suppressing or preventing soybean aphid population growth or establishment in Missouri, a predator exclusion study was conducted to gauge the efficacy of predator populations. Three levels of predator exclusion were used; one that excluded all insects (small mesh), one that excluded insects larger than thrips (medium mesh), and one that excluded insects larger than Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae), a principal predator (large mesh). Along with manipulating predator exposure, timing of aphid arrival (infestation) was manipulated. Three infestation times were studied; vegetative (V5), beginning bloom (R1), and beginning pod set (R3). Timing of aphid and predator arrival in a soybean field may affect the soybean aphids ability to establish and begin reproducing. Cages infested at V5 and with complete predator exclusion reached economic threshold within two weeks, while cages with predators reached economic threshold in four and a half weeks. Cages infested at R1 with complete predator exclusion reached economic threshold within five weeks; cages with predators reached economic threshold within six weeks. Cages infested at R3 never reached threshold (with or without predators). The predator population in Missouri seems robust, capable of depressing the growth of soybean aphid populations once established, and even preventing establishment when the aphid arrived late in the field.
Related JoVE Video
Distribution of the long-horned beetle, Dectes texanus, in soybeans of Missouri, Western Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas.
J. Insect Sci.
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The long-horned beetle, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is a stem-boring pest of soybeans, Glycine max (L.) Merrill (Fabales: Fabaceae). Soybean stems and stubble were collected from 131 counties in Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee and dissected to determine D. texanus infestation rates. All states sampled had D. texanus present in soybeans. Data from Tennessee and Arkansas showed sample infestations of D. texanus averaging nearly 40%. Samples from Missouri revealed higher infestation in the twelve southeastern counties compared to the rest of the state. Data from Mississippi suggested that D. texanus is not as problematic there as in Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee. Infestation rates from individual fields varied greatly (0-100%) within states. In Tennessee, second crop soybeans (i.e. soybeans planted following winter wheat) had lower infestations than full season soybeans. A map of pest distribution is presented that documents the extent of the problem, provides a baseline from which changes can be measured, contributes data for emergency registration of pesticides for specific geographic regions, and provides useful information for extension personnel, crop scouts, and growers.
Related JoVE Video
Western corn rootworm larval movement in SmartStax seed blend scenarios.
J. Econ. Entomol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Insect resistance management (IRM) can extend the lifetime of management options, but depends on extensive knowledge of the biology of the pest species involved for an optimal plan. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered seed blends refuge for two of the transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn products targeting the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Larval movement between Bt and isoline plants can be detrimental to resistance management for high dose Bt products because the larger larvae can be more tolerant of the Bt toxins. We assessed movement of western corn rootworm larvae among four spatial arrangements of SmartStax corn (expressing both the Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1 proteins) and isoline plants by infesting specific plants with wild type western corn rootworm eggs. Significantly fewer western corn rootworm larvae, on average, were recovered from infested SmartStax plants than infested isoline plants, and the SmartStax plants were significantly less damaged than corresponding isoline plants. However, when two infested isoline plants surrounded a SmartStax plant, a significant number of larvae moved onto the SmartStax plant late in the season. These larvae caused significant damage both years and produced significantly more beetles than any other plant configuration in the study (including isoline plants) in the first year of the study. This plant configuration would occur rarely in a 5% seed blend refuge and may produce beetles of a susceptible genotype because much of their initial larval development was on isoline plants. Results are discussed in terms of their potential effects on resistance management.
Related JoVE Video
Spatial distribution of Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae): a summary of the suction trap network.
J. Econ. Entomol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an economically important pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, in the United States. Phenological information of A. glycines is limited; specifically, little is known about factors guiding migrating aphids and potential impacts of long distance flights on local population dynamics. Increasing our understanding of A. glycines population dynamics may improve predictions of A. glycines outbreaks and improve management efforts. In 2005 a suction trap network was established in seven Midwest states to monitor the occurrence of alates. By 2006, this network expanded to 10 states and consisted of 42 traps. The goal of the STN was to monitor movement of A. glycines from their overwintering host Rhamnus spp. to soybean in spring, movement among soybean fields during summer, and emigration from soybean to Rhamnus in fall. The objective of this study was to infer movement patterns of A. glycines on a regional scale based on trap captures, and determine the suitability of certain statistical methods for future analyses. Overall, alates were not commonly collected in suction traps until June. The most alates were collected during a 3-wk period in the summer (late July to mid-August), followed by the fall, with a peak capture period during the last 2 wk of September. Alate captures were positively correlated with latitude, a pattern consistent with the distribution of Rhamnus in the United States, suggesting that more southern regions are infested by immigrants from the north.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.