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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Walking Trail Use Among a Sample of Black, White, Hispanic and Asian Adult Walkers.
J Phys Act Health
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2014
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Walking trails are positively associated with physical activity; however, few studies have been conducted among diverse communities. We sought to describe trail use and the physical and social environmental correlates of trail use in a racially/ethnically diverse sample.
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Features of the Built Environment Related to Physical Activity Friendliness and Children's Obesity and Other Risk Factors.
Public Health Nurs
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2014
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We investigated the relationships among environmental features of physical activity friendliness, socioeconomic indicators, and prevalence of obesity (BMI status), central adiposity (waist circumference, waist-height ratio), and hypertension.
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Evaluation of booster breaks in the workplace.
J. Occup. Environ. Med.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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This study elicited information regarding benefits of and barriers to participation in health-promoting work breaks, known as Booster Breaks, from participants with extensive experience (6 months to 1 year) with these types of breaks.
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Point-of-Decision Signs and Stair Use in a University Worksite Setting: General Versus Specific Messages.
Am J Health Promot
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2014
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Abstract Purpose . This study tested the effectiveness of two point-of-decision signs to increase stair use and investigated message content by comparing signs with general and specific messages. Design . This study used a quasi-experimental time series design, including a 2-week baseline period: 2 weeks with a general message and 2 weeks with a specific message. Setting . The signs were placed in an eight-story university building. Subjects . The subjects comprised all adults entering the building. During the study, 2997 observations of stair/elevator choice were made. Intervention . A stair-prompt sign with a general message and a sign with a specific message served as the interventions. Measures . Observers measured stair/elevator choice, demographics, and traffic volume. Analysis . Logistic regression analyses were employed, adjusting for covariates. Results . The specific sign intervention showed significantly increased odds of stair use compared to baseline (odds ratio [OR] = 2.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.46-2.84). The odds of stair use were also significantly greater with the specific sign than the general sign (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.13-2.20). Conclusion . Only the specific sign significantly increased stair use. The results indicate that a specific message may be more effective at promoting stair use.
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African-American breast cancer survivors preferences for various types of physical activity interventions: a Sisters Network Inc. web-based survey.
J Cancer Surviv
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2013
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Needs assessments are essential to developing lifestyle interventions for minority populations. To our knowledge, no physical activity (PA) needs assessment studies have been conducted for African-American (AA) breast cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to determine the PA intervention preferences of AA breast cancer survivors and determine whether these preferences differ according to medical and sociodemographic factors.
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Booster Breaks in the workplace: participants perspectives on health-promoting work breaks.
Health Educ Res
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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Increasing sedentary work has been associated with greater cardiovascular and metabolic risk, as well as premature mortality. Interrupting the sedentary workday with health-promoting work breaks can counter these negative health effects. To examine the potential sustainability of work-break programs, we assessed the acceptance of these breaks among participants in a Booster Break program. We analyzed qualitative responses from 35 participants across five worksites where one 15-min physical activity break was taken each workday. Two worksites completed a 1-year intervention and three worksites completed a 6-month intervention. Responses to two open-ended questions about the acceptance and feasibility of Booster Breaks were obtained from a survey administered after the intervention. Three themes for benefits and two themes for barriers were identified. The benefit themes were (i) reduced stress and promoted enjoyment, (ii) increased health awareness and facilitated behavior change, and (iii) enhanced workplace social interaction. The barrier themes were the need for (iv) greater variety in Booster Break routines and (v) greater management support. This study provides empirical support for the acceptance and feasibility of Booster Breaks during the workday. Emphasizing the benefits and minimizing the barriers are strategies that can be used to implement Booster Breaks in other workplaces.
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Fracture Risk Assessment in Older Adults Using a Combination of Selected Quantitative Computed Tomography Bone Measures: A Subanalysis of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.
J Clin Densitom
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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Bone mineral density (BMD) and geometric bone measures are individually associated with prevalent osteoporotic fractures. Whether an aggregate of these measures would better associate with fractures has not been examined. We examined relationships between self-reported fractures and selected bone measures acquired by quantitative computerized tomography (QCT), a composite bone score, and QCT-acquired dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-like total femur BMD in 2110 men and 2682 women in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. The combined bone score was generated by summing gender-specific Z-scores for 4 QCT measures: vertebral trabecular BMD, femur neck cortical thickness, femur neck trabecular BMD, and femur neck minimal cross-sectional area. Except for the latter measure, lower scores for QCT measures, singly and combined, showed positive (p < 0.05) associations with fractures. Results remained the same in stratified models for participants not taking bone-promoting medication. In women on bone-promoting medication, greater femur neck cortical thickness and trabecular BMD were significantly associated with fracture status. However, the association between fracture and combined bone score was not stronger than the associations between fracture and individual measures or total femur BMD. Thus, the selected measures did not all similarly associate with fracture status and did not appear to have an additive effect on fracture status.
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Parental and Peer Factors Associated with Body Image Discrepancy among Fifth-Grade Boys and Girls.
J Youth Adolesc
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2013
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Many young adolescents are dissatisfied with their body due to a discrepancy between their ideal and actual body size, which can lead to weight cycling, eating disorders, depression, and obesity. The current study examined the associations of parental and peer factors with fifth-graders body image discrepancy, physical self-worth as a mediator between parental and peer factors and body image discrepancy, and how these associations vary by childs sex. Body image discrepancy was defined as the difference between young adolescents self-perceived body size and the size they believe a person their age should be. Data for this study came from Healthy Passages, which surveyed 5,147 fifth graders (51 % females; 34 % African American, 35 % Latino, 24 % White, and 6 % other) and their primary caregivers from the United States. Path analyses were conducted separately for boys and girls. The findings for boys suggest father nurturance and getting along with peers are related negatively to body image discrepancy; however, for girls, fear of negative evaluation by peers is related positively to body image discrepancy. For both boys and girls, getting along with peers and fear of negative evaluation by peers are related directly to physical self-worth. In addition, mother nurturance is related positively to physical self-worth for girls, and father nurturance is related positively to physical self-worth for boys. In turn, physical self-worth, for both boys and girls, is related negatively to body image discrepancy. The findings highlight the potential of parental and peer factors to reduce fifth graders body image discrepancy.
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Lifestyle behaviors of African American breast cancer survivors: a Sisters Network, Inc. study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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African American breast cancer survivors experience poor cancer outcomes that may, in part, be remedied by healthy lifestyle choices. Few studies have evaluated the health and lifestyle behaviors of this population. The purpose of this study was to characterize the health and lifestyle habits of African American breast cancer survivors and evaluate the socio-demographic and medical correlates of these behaviors.
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Childhood obesity: a framework for policy approaches and ethical considerations.
Prev Chronic Dis
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2011
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Although obesity rates among US children have increased during the past 3 decades, effective public policies have been limited, and the quest for workable solutions raises ethical questions. To address these concerns, in 2010, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation convened an expert panel to consider approaches to the ethics problems related to interventions for childhood obesity. On the basis of recommendations from the expert panel, we propose frameworks for policy approaches and ethical aspects of interventions and evaluation. We present these frameworks in the context of other papers in this collection and make recommendations for public health practice.
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The use of point-of-sale machines in school cafeterias as a method of parental influence over child lunch food choices.
J Sch Health
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2011
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Computerized point-of-sale (POS) machine software that allows parents to place restrictions on their childs school meal accounts is available. Parents could restrict specific foods (eg, chips), identify specific days the child can purchase extra foods, or set monetary limits. This descriptive study examines the use of parental restrictions on student cafeteria POS accounts in a convenience sample of 2 school districts.
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Exercise among breast and prostate cancer survivors--what are their barriers?
J Cancer Surviv
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2011
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Despite proven benefits of regular physical activity, estimates indicate that few cancer survivors meet physical activity guidelines. The purpose of this paper is to identify and compare exercise barriers among cancer survivors, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally as they undergo home-based behavioral interventions.
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Linking service-learning with community-based participatory research: an interprofessional course for health professional students.
Nurs Outlook
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Service-learning is a valued strategy for educating health professionals. Linking service-learning with community-based participatory research (CBPR) engages students with community stakeholders and faculty in a collaborative process to bring about social change and improved health. The purpose of this paper is to describe a strategy for involving interprofessional students in ongoing faculty CBPR in an underserved community. The process includes the design and implementation of a course that combines weekly seminars with field experiences in the targeted community, emphasizing community assessment, and working with community members to find solutions to health problems. Nursing, public health, and medical students were recruited to the initial course, and offered the opportunity to meet objectives of required components of their disciplinary curriculum. Community members became actively involved in educating students while working to solve identified health problems. Important principles of CBPR--trust, collaboration, excellence in science, and ethics--are emphasized throughout the initiative. This course is now a regular offering for interprofessional students, providing valuable learning experiences for students, faculty, and the community. Ongoing faculty CBPR continues a trusting community-academic relationship and gives the community a voice in the solution for health problems.
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The Booster Break program: description and feasibility test of a worksite physical activity daily practice.
Work
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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Work breaks are underutilized opportunities to promote health. The Booster Break program is a co-worker led physical activity group session devoted exclusively to standard 15-minute work breaks. The purpose of this study was to report the fidelity, attendance, feasibility, and sustainability of the Booster Break program and to explore its potential impact.
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A structured, interactive method for youth participation in a school district-university partnership to prevent obesity.
J Sch Health
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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The involvement of school-age children in participatory research is described in the context of a school district-university partnership to prevent obesity in children. The purpose of this study was to elicit, from children in kindergarten (K) through sixth grade, perceptions of foods and activities that would inform the design of developmentally appropriate interventions to prevent and reduce childhood obesity.
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Environmental characteristics and physical activity in racial/ethnic minority and Euro-American college students.
Percept Mot Skills
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2009
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Little is known about the relations of environmental characteristics and physical activity of college students, especially students from diverse racial or ethnic backgrounds. Associations were examined between environmental characteristics and moderate and vigorous activity in racial or ethnic minority (n = 418; M age = 24.3 +/- 4.5 yr.; 54.2% women) and Euro-American (n = 297; M age = 23.5 +/- 4.4 yr.; 49.7% women) college students. Participants completed questionnaires assessing demographic measures, physical activity, exercise equipment at home, neighborhood characteristics, and convenient places for physical activity. Moderate and vigorous activity participation was similar between the two groups even though racial or ethnic minorities had less supportive home and neighborhood environments for activity and fewer convenient facilities. Greater moderate and vigorous activity were related with more convenient facilities in racial or ethnic minorities. Vigorous activity was associated with better neighborhood characteristics for Euro-Americans. The findings can inform the design and implementation of environmental approaches to promoting activity of college students from diverse ethnic backgrounds.
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Neighborhood characteristics favorable to outdoor physical activity: disparities by socioeconomic and racial/ethnic composition.
Health Place
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2009
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This paper uses a socioecological framework to investigate socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in neighborhood characteristics that are associated with outdoor physical activity. We surveyed 632 parents of 5th graders about perceptions of their neighborhood social processes and collected systematic observations of the physical environment on their block-face of residence. Higher poverty neighborhoods and non-White neighborhoods have better accessibility; however, they are less safe, less comfortable, and less pleasurable for outdoor physical activity, and have less favorable social processes. Interventions to reduce disparities in physical activity should address not only the physical environment, but also social processes favorable to physical activity.
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Disparities in physical activity and sedentary behaviors among US children and adolescents: prevalence, correlates, and intervention implications.
J Public Health Policy
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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Regular physical activity is important for health benefits among youth, but disparities exist. This paper describes disparities in physical activity participation and sedentary behaviors among youth in the United States, provides intervention implications, and offers recommendations for future research focused on reducing disparities related to levels of physical activity. Secondary analysis of national accelerometer data showed that achievement of recommended levels of physical activity ranged across subgroups from 2% to 61%. Mean hours per day spent in sedentary behavior ranged from 5.5 to 8.5. The largest disparities were by gender and age. An improved understanding of correlates may inform the design of interventions to increase physical activity in targeted subgroups. Additional theoretically based research is needed to elucidate which factors contributing to physical activity disparities are amenable to change via intervention. To eliminate health disparities, changes in policies that have an impact on physical activity may be necessary to promote physical activity among high-risk youth.
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Weight status, quality of life, and self-concept in African American, Hispanic, and white fifth-grade children.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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This study examined the association between weight status and quality of life (QOL) in fifth-grade African American, Hispanic, and white children and the potential mediation of this relationship by self-concept. A sample was recruited from fifth-grade public school students in three sites, of whom 599 were African American (40%), Hispanic (34%), or white (26%). During a home interview, physical and psychosocial QOL and global and body-specific self-concept were measured. Measured height and weight were used to calculate BMI. In this sample, 57% were classified by BMI as not overweight, 17%, overweight, and 26%, obese. Although there was no significant interaction between weight classification and race/ethnicity for QOL, obese children reported significantly lower psychosocial but not physical QOL than those classified as not overweight. There was a significant association between BMI (measured continuously) and psychosocial QOL, but only 2% of the variance was accounted for. Both global self-concept and body dissatisfaction independently mediated significant portions of the association between BMI and psychosocial QOL. Being obese in childhood may have negative psychosocial effects.
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Measurement of park and recreation environments that support physical activity in low-income communities of color: highlights of challenges and recommendations.
Am J Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2009
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The capacity of public parks and recreation environments to promote physical activity for low-income communities of color is receiving increased attention from researchers and policymakers. As a result, several systems to measure park and recreation environments have been recently developed. Developing measures is important because they are critical to establishing key correlates and determinants that drive physical activity and inform intervention strategies. This paper briefly reviews recently developed approaches for measuring physical environments within public parks and recreation areas. It critiques the capacity of these approaches to advance an understanding of how parks and recreation settings contribute to physical activity in low-income communities of color. Residents of low-income communities of color are usually found to have lower physical activity, and this may be due partly to a disparity in access to parks and other recreation environments. Three primary recommendations are presented. First, future measurement tools should explicitly reflect inequality in the built environment in terms of availability and quality of parks and recreation areas. Second, measurement strategies should incorporate research on recreation activity and setting preferences important in low-income communities of color. Finally, the perceptions of residents of low-income communities of color should be reflected in measurement approaches. One strategy for incorporating the perceptions is community-based participatory research. The rapid development of high-quality tools for measuring parks and recreation environments is encouraging. However, existing measures should be tested and refined in varying social-ecologic conditions, and new tools should be developed specifically for nuances associated with low-income minority communities.
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Community energy balance: a framework for contextualizing cultural influences on high risk of obesity in ethnic minority populations.
Prev Med
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Increases in the availability, affordability, and promotion of high-calorie foods and beverages and decreased obligations for routine physical activity have fostered trends of increased obesity worldwide. In high-income, plural societies, above average obesity prevalence is often observed in ethnic minority communities, suggesting that obesity-promoting influences are more prevalent or potent in these communities.
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Self-efficacy and barriers to multiple behavior change in low-income African Americans with hypertension.
J Behav Med
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Behavioral risk factors are among the preventable causes of health disparities, yet long-term change remains elusive. Many interventions are designed to increase self-efficacy, but little is known about the effect on long-term behavior change in older, low-income African Americans, especially when facing more problematic barriers. A cohort of 185 low-income African-Americans with hypertension reported barriers they encountered while undergoing a multiple behavior change trial from 2002 to 2006. The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationships between self-efficacy, barriers, and multiple behavior change over time. Higher self-efficacy seemed to be partially helpful for smoking reduction and increasing physical activity, but not for following a low-sodium diet. Addiction was indirectly associated with less reduction in smoking through lower self-efficacy. Otherwise, different barriers were associated with behavior change than were associated with self-efficacy: being "too busy" directly interfered with physical activity and "traditions" with low-sodium diet; however, they were neither the most frequently reported barriers, nor associated with lower self-efficacy. This suggests that an emphasis on self-efficacy alone may be insufficient for overcoming the most salient barriers encountered by older African Americans. Additionally, the most common perceived barriers may not necessarily be relevant to long-term behavioral outcomes.
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Environmental Audits of Friendliness toward Physical Activity in Three Income Levels.
J Urban Health
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An important research area is the relationship among income status, health, and the environment. This study examined the relationships among income levels, features of the environment and friendliness toward physical activity. We investigated whether low-, middle-, and high-income neighborhoods differ in terms of four environmental characteristics that affect the degree to which an area is conducive to physical activity: population density, land use diversity, street design, and physical disorder in the environment. In a large, urban southwestern county, 30 block groups were randomly selected to represent low-, middle-, and high-income neighborhoods. Using the St. Louis Environmental Checklist Audit, walking audits were conducted and analyzed. The low-income neighborhoods had significantly greater density and land use diversity than the high-income neighborhoods. High- and middle-income neighborhoods had significantly fewer manifestations of physical disorder and incivility than low-income neighborhoods. Features of physical activity-promoting environments were found in each income level neighborhood.
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Associations among physical activity, body mass index, and health-related quality of life by race/ethnicity in a diverse sample of breast cancer survivors.
Cancer
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Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), body mass index (BMI), and physical activity (PA) levels have all been associated with prognosis following breast cancer and may explain partially the higher mortality for breast cancer in certain racial/ethnic subgroups. In this study, associations between PA, BMI, and HRQOL by race were examined in a sample of breast cancer survivors.
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Long-term physical activity outcomes of home-based lifestyle interventions among breast and prostate cancer survivors.
Support Care Cancer
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Few studies have investigated long-term effects of physical activity (PA) interventions. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether or not increased levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were maintained by cancer survivors 1 year after receipt of two home-based interventions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.