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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The UP4FUN Intervention Effect on Breaking Up Sedentary Time in 10- to 12-Year-Old Belgian Children: The ENERGY-Project.
Pediatr Exerc Sci
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2014
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There are currently no studies available reporting intervention effects on breaking up children's sedentary time. This study examined the UP4FUN intervention effect on objectively measured number of breaks in sedentary time, number of sedentary bouts (?10 mins) and total and average amount of time spent in those sedentary bouts among 10- to 12- year-old Belgian children. The total sample included 354 children (mean age: 10.9±0.7 years; 59% girls) with valid ActiGraph accelerometer data at pre- and post-test. Only few and small intervention effects were found, namely on total time spent in sedentary bouts immediately after school hours (4-6PM; ß=-3.51mins) and on average time spent in sedentary bouts before school hours (6-8.30AM; ß=-4.83mins) and immediately after school hours in favour of children from intervention schools (ß=-2.71mins). Unexpectedly, girls from intervention schools decreased the number of breaks during school hours (8.30AM-4PM; ß=-23.45breaks) and increased the number of sedentary bouts on a weekend day (ß=+0.90bouts), whereas girls in control schools showed an increase in number of breaks and a decrease in number of bouts. In conclusion, UP4FUN did not have a consistent or substantial effect on breaking up children's sedentary time and these data suggest that more intensive and longer lasting interventions are needed.
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The school nutrition environment and its association with soft drink intakes in seven countries across Europe - the ENERGY project.
Health Place
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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The school is an important setting for promoting healthy eating especially at the transition from childhood to adolescence. This study contributes to the literature by describing practices within physical, political and sociocultural aspects of the school nutrition environment in seven countries across Europe based on questionnaires to the school management, and exploring their associations with soft drink consumption reported on questionnaires by 10-12 year olds. Several of the commonly self-reported practices could be supportive of a healthy diet (time to eat, access to water, restriction on marketing), but some practices were underutilized (i.e. discussion with stakeholders, healthy foods at events). Only a few associations of practices with the pupils? soft drink consumption were found.
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A meta-analysis of serious digital games for healthy lifestyle promotion.
Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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Several systematic reviews have described health-promoting effects of serious games but so far no meta-analysis has been reported. This paper presents a meta-analysis of 54 serious digital game studies for healthy lifestyle promotion, in which we investigated the overall effectiveness of serious digital games on healthy lifestyle promotion outcomes and the role of theoretically and clinically important moderators. Findings showed that serious games have small positive effects on healthy lifestyles (g=0.260, 95% CI 0.148; 0.373) and their determinants (g=0.334, 95% CI 0.260; 0.407), especially for knowledge. Effects on clinical outcomes were significant, but much smaller (g=0.079, 95% CI 0.038; 0.120). Long-term effects were maintained for all outcomes except for behavior. Serious games are best individually tailored to both socio-demographic and change need information, and benefit from a strong focus on game theories or a dual theoretical foundation in both behavioral prediction and game theories. They can be effective either as a stand-alone or multi-component programs, and appeal to populations regardless of age and gender. Given that effects of games remain heterogeneous, further explorations of which game features create larger effects are needed.
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The role of family-related factors in the effects of the UP4FUN school-based family-focused intervention targeting screen time in 10- to 12-year-old children: the ENERGY project.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2014
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Screen-related behaviours are highly prevalent in schoolchildren. Considering the adverse health effects and the relation of obesity and screen time in childhood, efforts to affect screen use in children are warranted. Parents have been identified as an important influence on children's screen time and therefore should be involved in prevention programmes. The aim was to examine the mediating role of family-related factors on the effects of the school-based family-focused UP4FUN intervention aimed at screen time in 10- to 12-year-old European children (n child-parent dyads = 1940).
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Family sociodemographic characteristics as correlates of children's breakfast habits and weight status in eight European countries. The ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project.
Public Health Nutr
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations of family sociodemographic characteristics with children's weight status and whether these potential associations are mediated by children's breakfast habits.
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Associations between Family-Related Factors, Breakfast Consumption and BMI among 10- to 12-Year-Old European Children: The Cross-Sectional ENERGY-Study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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To investigate associations of family-related factors with childrens breakfast consumption and BMI-z-score and to examine whether childrens breakfast consumption mediates associations between family-related factors and childrens BMI-z-score.
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Mediating effects of home-related factors on fat intake from snacks in a school-based nutrition intervention among adolescents.
Health Educ Res
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2011
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The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the effects of the parental component of a school-based intervention on dietary fat intake from snacking were mediated by changes in home-related factors. A random sample of 10 schools with 2232 pupils aged 11-15 years was randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups [one with (n = 1226) and one without a parental component (n = 1006)]. Fat intake, home availability of low-fat foods and parental encouragement and support to eat a low-fat diet were assessed with validated self-administered questionnaires. Mediation was assessed with the product-of-coefficient test. Changes in home-related determinants were significantly related to changes in fat intake from snacks; therefore, school-based obesity programmes on adolescents should try to address these determinants. In the present study, one of the three investigated home-related factors, namely parental support, was affected by the parental component intervention. Decreases in parental support were prevented. These changes in parental support were found to mediate the parental intervention effects on changes in fat intake from snacks. Home-related factors appear to be related to changes in adolescents snacking behaviours, therefore, school-based obesity programmes should target them. Nevertheless, more research is needed concerning effectively addressing the other determinants.
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Effectiveness of workplace interventions in Europe promoting healthy eating: a systematic review.
Eur J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2011
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The worksite is a promising setting for health promotion. This review summarizes the evidence of effect of intervention studies in European countries promoting a healthy diet solely and in combination with increasing physical activity at the workplace.
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What do parents think about parental participation in school-based interventions on energy balance-related behaviours? a qualitative study in 4 countries.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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Overweight and obesity in youth has increased dramatically. Therefore, overweight prevention initiatives should start early in life and target modifiable energy balance-related behaviours. Parental participation is often advocated as important for school-based interventions, however, getting parents involved in school-based interventions appears to be challenging based on earlier intervention experiences. The purpose of this study was to get insight into the determinants of and perspectives on parental participation in school-interventions on energy balance-related behaviours (physical activity, healthy eating, sedentary behaviours) in parents of ten- to twelve-year olds in order to develop an effective parental module for school-based interventions concerning energy balance-related behaviours.
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Associations between home- and family-related factors and fruit juice and soft drink intake among 10- to 12-year old children. The ENERGY project.
Appetite
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The aim of this study is to investigate associations of family-related factors with childrens fruit drink/juice and soft drink consumption. A cross-sectional survey among 10- to 12-year-old children and their parents in eight European countries was conducted to gather this data. Key variables of interest were childrens self-reported fruit drink/juice and soft drink intake per day (outcome) and family-related factors (based on parents report) related to these two behaviors (modeling, automaticity, availability, monitoring, permissiveness, negotiating, communicating health beliefs, avoid negative modeling, self-efficacy, rewarding, and family consumption). 7915 Children (52% girls; mean age=11.7 ± 0.8 years) and 6512 parents (83% women; mean age=41.4 ± 5.3 years) completed the questionnaire. Multilevel regression analyses were used to examine the aforementioned associations. Three of the 11 family-related factors (modeling, availability, and family consumption) were positively associated with childrens fruit drink/juice and soft drink intake. Additionally, three family-related factors (permissiveness, monitoring, and self-efficacy) were solely associated with soft drink intake and one family-related factor (communicating health beliefs) was related to fruit drink/juice intake. Future interventions targeting childrens fruit drink/juice and soft drink intake should focus on the home environment, parents and their practices, especially on parents fruit drink/juice and soft drink intake and availability of these beverages at home.
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Family- and school-based predictors of energy balance-related behaviours in children: a 6-year longitudinal study.
Public Health Nutr
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To examine family- and school-based predictors of breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption and physical activity (PA) and moderating effects of gender and socio-economic status (SES).
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The effect of the UP4FUN pilot intervention on objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity in 10-12 year old children in Belgium: the ENERGY-project.
BMC Public Health
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BAKCKGROUND: The first aim was to examine the effect of the UP4FUN pilot intervention on childrens total sedentary time. The second aim was to investigate if the intervention had an effect on childrens physical activity (PA) level. Finally, we aimed to investigate demographic differences (i.e. age, gender, ethnicity, living status and having siblings) between children in the intervention group who improved in sedentary time and PA at post-test and children in the intervention group who worsened in sedentary time and PA at post-test.
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Test-retest reliability and construct validity of the ENERGY-parent questionnaire on parenting practices, energy balance-related behaviours and their potential behavioural determinants: the ENERGY-project.
BMC Res Notes
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Insight in parental energy balance-related behaviours, their determinants and parenting practices are important to inform childhood obesity prevention. Therefore, reliable and valid tools to measure these variables in large-scale population research are needed. The objective of the current study was to examine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the parent questionnaire used in the ENERGY-project, assessing parental energy balance-related behaviours, their determinants, and parenting practices among parents of 10-12 year old children.
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Self-reported TV and computer time do not represent accelerometer-derived total sedentary time in 10 to 12-year-olds.
Eur J Public Health
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Screen-time activities are often used as proxies for sedentary time. We studied associations of self-reported television (TV), computer and total screen-time with accelerometer-derived total sedentary time in European children (10-12 years). Analyses showed significant positive associations between TV, computer and total screen-time with total sedentary time for the total sample, however, the explained variance was low and stratified analyses only revealed a significant positive association between total screen-time and total sedentary time in boys and between computer time and total sedentary time in Dutch children. This suggests that self-reported TV and computer time do not adequately reflect total sedentary time in schoolchildren.
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Levels of physical activity and sedentary time among 10- to 12-year-old boys and girls across 5 European countries using accelerometers: an observational study within the ENERGY-project.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act
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The study aim was to objectively assess levels of sedentary time, light, moderate and vigorous physical activity (PA) among 10-12 year olds across five European countries and to examine differences in sedentary time and PA according to gender and country.
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Effects of a 2-year healthy eating and physical activity intervention for 3-6-year-olds in communities of high and low socio-economic status: the POP (Prevention of Overweight among Pre-school and school children) project.
Public Health Nutr
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The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a school-based, 2-year, multi-component intervention on BMI, eating and physical activity behaviour in Flanders, Belgium, targeting children aged 3-6 years in communities of high and low socio-economic status (SES).
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Does parental involvement make a difference in school-based nutrition and physical activity interventions? A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.
Int J Public Health
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Parental involvement is often advocated as important for school-based interventions, however, to date, only inconsistent evidence is available. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact of parental involvement in school-based obesity prevention interventions in children and adolescents.
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Family- and school-based correlates of energy balance-related behaviours in 10-12-year-old children: a systematic review within the ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project.
Public Health Nutr
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To identify family- and school-based correlates of specific energy balance-related behaviours (physical activity, sedentary behaviour, breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption) among 10-12-year-olds, using the EnRG framework (Environmental Research framework for weight Gain prevention).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.