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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Limited duration of complete remission on ruxolitinib in myeloid neoplasms with PCM1-JAK2 and BCR-JAK2 fusion genes.
Ann. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2014
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Rearrangements of chromosome band 9p24 are known to be associated with JAK2 fusion genes, e.g., t(8;9)(p22;p24) with a PCM1-JAK2 and t(9;22)(p24;q11) with a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene, respectively. In association with myeloid neoplasms, the clinical course is aggressive, and in absence of effective conventional treatment options, long-term remission is usually only observed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). With the discovery of inhibitors of the JAK2 tyrosine kinase and based on encouraging in vitro and in vivo data, we treated two male patients with myeloid neoplasms and a PCM1-JAK2 or a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene, respectively, with the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. After 12 months of treatment, both patients achieved a complete clinical, hematologic, and cytogenetic response. Non-hematologic toxicity was only grade 1 while no hematologic toxicity was observed. However, remission in both patients was only short-term, with relapse occurring after 18 and 24 months, respectively, making ASCT indispensable in both cases. This data highlight (1) the ongoing importance of cytogenetic analysis for the diagnostic work-up of myeloid neoplasms as it may guide targeted therapy and (2) remission under ruxolitinib may only be short-termed in JAK2 fusion genes but it may be an important bridging therapy prior to ASCT.
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Exome sequence read depth methods for identifying copy number changes.
Brief. Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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Copy number variants (CNVs) play important roles in a number of human diseases and in pharmacogenetics. Powerful methods exist for CNV detection in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data, but such data are costly to obtain. Many disease causal CNVs span or are found in genome coding regions (exons), which makes CNV detection using whole exome sequencing (WES) data attractive. If reliably validated against WGS-based CNVs, exome-derived CNVs have potential applications in a clinical setting. Several algorithms have been developed to exploit exome data for CNV detection and comparisons made to find the most suitable methods for particular data samples. The results are not consistent across studies. Here, we review some of the exome CNV detection methods based on depth of coverage profiles and examine their performance to identify problems contributing to discrepancies in published results. We also present a streamlined strategy that uses a single metric, the likelihood ratio, to compare exome methods, and we demonstrated its utility using the VarScan 2 and eXome Hidden Markov Model (XHMM) programs using paired normal and tumour exome data from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients. We use array-based somatic CNV (SCNV) calls as a reference standard to compute prevalence-independent statistics, such as sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio, for validation of the exome-derived SCNVs. We also account for factors known to influence the performance of exome read depth methods, such as CNV size and frequency, while comparing our findings with published results.
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Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.
Kristen S Purrington, Seth Slettedahl, Manjeet K Bolla, Kyriaki Michailidou, Kamila Czene, Heli Nevanlinna, Stig E Bojesen, Irene L Andrulis, Angela Cox, Per Hall, Jane Carpenter, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Christopher A Haiman, Peter A Fasching, Arto Mannermaa, Robert Winqvist, Hermann Brenner, Annika Lindblom, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Javier Benitez, Anthony Swerdlow, Vessela Kristensen, Pascal Guénel, Alfons Meindl, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Rainer Fagerholm, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Xianshu Wang, Curtis Olswold, Janet E Olson, Anna Marie Mulligan, Julia A Knight, Sandrine Tchatchou, Malcolm W R Reed, Simon S Cross, Jianjun Liu, Jingmei Li, Keith Humphreys, Christine Clarke, Rodney Scott, , Florentia Fostira, George Fountzilas, Irene Konstantopoulou, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Arif B Ekici, Arndt Hartmann, Matthias W Beckmann, Jaana M Hartikainen, Veli-Matti Kosma, Vesa Kataja, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Katri Pylkäs, Saila Kauppila, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Christa Stegmaier, Volker Arndt, Sara Margolin, Rosemary Balleine, José Ignacio Arias Perez, M Pilar Zamora, Primitiva Menéndez, Alan Ashworth, Michael Jones, Nick Orr, Patrick Arveux, Pierre Kerbrat, Thérèse Truong, Peter Bugert, Amanda E Toland, Christine B Ambrosone, France Labrèche, Mark S Goldberg, Martine Dumont, Argyrios Ziogas, Eunjung Lee, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Jirong Long, Martha Shrubsole, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Filomena Ficarazzi, Monica Barile, Paolo Peterlongo, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, Carolien H M van Deurzen, John W M Martens, Mieke Kriege, Jonine D Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Andreas Schneeweiss, William J Tapper, Susan M Gerty, Lorraine Durcan, Catriona McLean, Roger L Milne, Laura Baglietto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Laura J Van't Veer, Sten Cornelissen, Asta Försti, Diana Torres, Thomas Rüdiger, Anja Rudolph, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Stefan Nickels, Caroline Weltens, Giuseppe Floris, Matthieu Moisse, Joe Dennis, Qin Wang, Alison M Dunning, Mitul Shah, Judith Brown, Jacques Simard, Hoda Anton-Culver, Susan L Neuhausen, John L Hopper, Natalia Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Wei Zheng, Paolo Radice, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Peter Devillee, Hiltrud Brauch, Maartje Hooning, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Elinor Sawyer, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederick Marmee, Diana M Eccles, Graham G Giles, Julian Peto, Marjanka Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Ute Hamann, Jenny Chang-Claude, Diether Lambrechts, Paul D P Pharoah, Douglas Easton, V Shane Pankratz, Susan Slager, Celine M Vachon, Fergus J Couch.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer.
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2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.
Jingmei Li, Linda S Lindström, Jia N Foo, Sajjad Rafiq, Marjanka K Schmidt, Paul D P Pharoah, Kyriaki Michailidou, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Laura J van 't Veer, Sten Cornelissen, Emiel Rutgers, Melissa C Southey, Carmel Apicella, Gillian S Dite, John L Hopper, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Haeberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Carl Blomqvist, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Vesa Kataja, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Kelly-Anne Phillips, Sue-Anne McLachlan, Diether Lambrechts, Bernard Thienpont, Ann Smeets, Hans Wildiers, Jenny Chang-Claude, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Petra Seibold, Anja Rudolph, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Vessela Kristensen, Grethe I Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Borresen-Dale, Silje Nord, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Peter Devilee, Robert Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Maartje Hooning, Mieke Kriege, Antoinette Hollestelle, Ans van den Ouweland, Yi Li, Ute Hamann, Diana Torres, Hans U Ulmer, Thomas Rüdiger, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Shou-Tung Chen, Soo Hwang Teo, Nur Aishah Mohd Taib, Cheng Har Yip, Gwo Fuang Ho, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Kazuo Tajima, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Keun-Young Yoo, Tom Maishman, William J Tapper, Alison Dunning, Mitul Shah, Robert Luben, Judith Brown, Chiea Chuen Khor, Diana M Eccles, Heli Nevanlinna, Douglas Easton, Keith Humphreys, Jianjun Liu, Per Hall, Kamila Czene.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.
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Megalencephaly syndromes: exome pipeline strategies for detecting low-level mosaic mutations.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Two megalencephaly (MEG) syndromes, megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) and megalencephaly-polymicrogyriapolydactyly-hydrocephalus (MPPH), have recently been defined on the basis of physical and neuroimaging features. Subsequently, exome sequencing of ten MEG cases identified de-novo postzygotic mutations in PIK3CA which cause MCAP and de-novo mutations in AKT and PIK3R2 which cause MPPH. Here we present findings from exome sequencing three unrelated megalencephaly patients which identified a causal PIK3CA mutation in two cases and a causal PIK3R2 mutation in the third case. However, our patient with the PIK3R2 mutation which is considered to cause MPPH has a marked bifrontal band heterotopia which is a feature of MCAP. Furthermore, one of our patients with a PIK3CA mutation lacks syndactyly/polydactyly which is a characteristic of MCAP. These findings suggest that the overlap between MCAP and MPPH may be greater than the available studies suggest. In addition, the PIK3CA mutation in one of our patients could not be detected using standard exome analysis because the mutation was observed at a low frequency consistent with somatic mosaicism. We have therefore investigated several alternative methods of exome analysis and demonstrate that alteration of the initial allele frequency spectrum (AFS), used as a prior for variant calling in samtools, had the greatest power to detect variants with low mutant allele frequencies in our 3 MEG exomes and in simulated data. We therefore recommend non-default settings of the AFS in combination with stringent quality control when searching for causal mutation(s) that could have low levels of mutant reads due to post-zygotic mutation.
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Genome-wide association study identifies 25 known breast cancer susceptibility loci as risk factors for triple negative breast cancer.
Kristen S Purrington, Susan Slager, Diana Eccles, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Peter A Fasching, Penelope Miron, Jane Carpenter, Jenny Chang-Claude, Nicholas G Martin, Grant W Montgomery, Vessela Kristensen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Paul Goodfellow, William J Tapper, Sajjad Rafiq, Susan M Gerty, Lorraine Durcan, Irene Konstantopoulou, Florentia Fostira, Athanassios Vratimos, Paraskevi Apostolou, Irene Konstanta, Vassiliki Kotoula, Sotiris Lakis, Meletios A Dimopoulos, Dimosthenis Skarlos, Dimitrios Pectasides, George Fountzilas, Matthias W Beckmann, Alexander Hein, Matthias Ruebner, Arif B Ekici, Arndt Hartmann, Ruediger Schulz-Wendtland, Stefan P Renner, Wolfgang Janni, Brigitte Rack, Christoph Scholz, Julia Neugebauer, Ulrich Andergassen, Michael P Lux, Lothar Haeberle, Christine Clarke, Nirmala Pathmanathan, Anja Rudolph, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Stefan Nickels, Janet E Olson, James N Ingle, Curtis Olswold, Seth Slettedahl, Jeanette E Eckel-Passow, S Keith Anderson, Daniel W Visscher, Victoria L Cafourek, Hugues Sicotte, Naresh Prodduturi, Elisabete Weiderpass, Leslie Bernstein, Argyrios Ziogas, Jennifer Ivanovich, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Melissa Southey, Veli-Matti Kosma, Hans-Peter Fischer, , Malcom W R Reed, Simon S Cross, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha Shrubsole, Qiuyin Cai, Xiao-Ou Shu, Mary Daly, Joellen Weaver, Eric Ross, Jennifer Klemp, Priyanka Sharma, Diana Torres, Thomas Rüdiger, Heidrun Wölfing, Hans-Ulrich Ulmer, Asta Försti, Thaer Khoury, Shicha Kumar, Robert Pilarski, Charles L Shapiro, Dario Greco, Päivi Heikkilä, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Astrid Irwanto, Jianjun Liu, Vernon Shane Pankratz, Xianshu Wang, Gianluca Severi, Arto Mannermaa, Douglas Easton, Per Hall, Hiltrud Brauch, Angela Cox, Wei Zheng, Andrew K Godwin, Ute Hamann, Christine Ambrosone, Amanda Ewart Toland, Heli Nevanlinna, Celine M Vachon, Fergus J Couch.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2013
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Triple negative (TN) breast cancer is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer associated with a unique set of epidemiologic and genetic risk factors. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TN breast cancer (stage 1: 1,529 TN cases, 3,399 controls; stage 2: 2,148 cases, 1,309 controls) to identify loci that influence TN breast cancer risk. Variants in the 19p13.1 and PTHLH loci showed genome-wide significant associations (p<5x10(-8)) in stage 1 and 2 combined. Results also suggested a substantial enrichment of significantly associated variants among the SNPs analyzed in stage 2. Variants from 25 of 74 known breast cancer susceptibility loci were also associated with risk of TN breast cancer (p<0.05). Associations with TN breast cancer were confirmed for ten loci (LGR6, MDM4, CASP8, 2q35, 2p24.1, TERT-rs10069690, ESR1, TOX3, 19p13.1, RALY), and we identified associations with TN breast cancer for 15 additional breast cancer loci (p<0.05: PEX14, 2q24.1, 2q31.1, ADAM29, EBF1, TCF7L2, 11q13.1, 11q24.3, 12p13.1, PTHLH, NTN4, 12q24, BRCA2, RAD51L1-rs2588809, MKL1). Further, two SNPs independent of previously reported signals in ESR1 (rs12525163 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.15, p=4.9x10(-4)) and 19p13.1 (rs1864112 OR=0.84, p=1.8x10(-9)) were associated with TN breast cancer. A polygenic risk score (PRS) for TN breast cancer based on known breast cancer risk variants showed a 4-fold difference in risk between the highest and lowest PRS quintiles (OR=4.03, 95% CI 3.46-4.70, p=4.8x10(-69)). This translates to an absolute risk for TN breast cancer ranging from 0.8% to 3.4%, suggesting that genetic variation may be used for TN breast cancer risk prediction.
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Identification of inherited genetic variations influencing prognosis in early-onset breast cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have begun to investigate associations between inherited genetic variations and breast cancer prognosis. Here, we report our findings from a GWAS conducted in 536 patients with early-onset breast cancer aged 40 or less at diagnosis and with a mean follow-up period of 4.1 years (SD = 1.96). Patients were selected from the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer. A Bonferroni correction for multiple testing determined that a P value of 1.0 × 10(-7) was a statistically significant association signal. Following quality control, we identified 487,496 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for association tests in stage 1. In stage 2, 35 SNPs with the most significant associations were genotyped in 1,516 independent cases from the same early-onset cohort. In stage 2, 11 SNPs remained associated in the same direction (P ? 0.05). Fixed effects meta-analysis models identified one SNP associated at close to genome wide level of significance 556 kb upstream of the ARRDC3 locus [HR = 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.33-1.96; P = 9.5 × 10(-7)]. Four further associations at or close to the PBX1, ROR?, NTN1, and SYT6 loci also came close to genome-wide significance levels (P = 10(-6)). In the first ever GWAS for the identification of SNPs associated with prognosis in patients with early-onset breast cancer, we report a SNP upstream of the ARRDC3 locus as potentially associated with prognosis (median follow-up time for genotypes: CC = 4 years, CT = 3 years, and TT = 2.7 years; Wilcoxon rank-sum test CC vs. CT, P = 4 × 10(-4) and CT vs. TT, P = 0.76). Four further loci may also be associated with prognosis.
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Support Vector Machine classifier for estrogen receptor positive and negative early-onset breast cancer.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Two major breast cancer sub-types are defined by the expression of estrogen receptors on tumour cells. Cancers with large numbers of receptors are termed estrogen receptor positive and those with few are estrogen receptor negative. Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotype data for a sample of early-onset breast cancer patients we developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier from 200 germline variants associated with estrogen receptor status (p<0.0005). Using a linear kernel Support Vector Machine, we achieved classification accuracy exceeding 93%. The model indicates that polygenic variation in more than 100 genes is likely to underlie the estrogen receptor phenotype in early-onset breast cancer. Functional classification of the genes involved identifies enrichment of functions linked to the immune system, which is consistent with the current understanding of the biological role of estrogen receptors in breast cancer.
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Mapping of chromosome 1p deletions in myeloma identifies FAM46C at 1p12 and CDKN2C at 1p32.3 as being genes in regions associated with adverse survival.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2011
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Regions on 1p with recurrent deletions in presenting myeloma patients were examined with the purpose of defining the deletions and assessing their survival impact.
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The clinical impact and molecular biology of del(17p) in multiple myeloma treated with conventional or thalidomide-based therapy.
Genes Chromosomes Cancer
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2011
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Hemizygous deletion of 17p (del(17p)) has been identified as a variable associated with poor prognosis in myeloma, although its impact in the context of thalidomide therapy is not well described. The clinical outcome of 85 myeloma patients with del(17p) treated in a clinical trial incorporating both conventional and thalidomide-based induction therapies was examined. The clinical impact of deletion, low expression, and mutation of TP53 was also determined. Patients with del(17p) did not have inferior response rates compared to patients without del(17p), but, despite this, del(17p) was associated with impaired overall survival (OS) (median OS 26.6 vs. 48.5 months, P < 0.001). Within the del(17p) group, thalidomide induction therapy was associated with improved response rates compared to conventional therapy, but there was no impact on OS. Thalidomide maintenance was associated with impaired OS, although our analysis suggests that this effect may have been due to confounding variables. A minimally deleted region on 17p13.1 involving 17 genes was identified, of which only TP53 and SAT2 were underexpressed. TP53 was mutated in <1% in patients without del(17p) and in 27% of patients with del(17p). The higher TP53 mutation rate in samples with del(17p) suggests a role for TP53 in these clinical outcomes. In conclusion, del(17p) defined a patient group associated with short survival in myeloma, and although thalidomide induction therapy was associated with improved response rates, it did not impact OS, suggesting that alternative therapeutic strategies are required for this group.
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Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple-negative breast cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2011
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Triple-negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiologic factors that promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome-wide association studies display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by the status of estrogen and progesterone receptors. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple-negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single-nucleotide polymorphisms, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.1), and rs8100241 (19p13.1), significantly associated with the risk of triple-negative breast cancer. Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple-negative breast cancer.
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Gender disparities in the tumor genetics and clinical outcome of multiple myeloma.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Several cancer types have differences in incidence and clinical outcome dependent on gender, but these are not well described in myeloma. The aim of this study was to characterize gender disparities in myeloma.
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A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.
Christopher A Haiman, Gary K Chen, Celine M Vachon, Federico Canzian, Alison Dunning, Robert C Millikan, Xianshu Wang, Foluso Ademuyiwa, Shahana Ahmed, Christine B Ambrosone, Laura Baglietto, Rosemary Balleine, Elisa V Bandera, Matthias W Beckmann, Christine D Berg, Leslie Bernstein, Carl Blomqvist, William J Blot, Hiltrud Brauch, Julie E Buring, Lisa A Carey, Jane E Carpenter, Jenny Chang-Claude, Stephen J Chanock, Daniel I Chasman, Christine L Clarke, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Sandra L Deming, Robert B Diasio, Athanasios M Dimopoulos, W Ryan Driver, Thomas Dünnebier, Lorraine Durcan, Diana Eccles, Christopher K Edlund, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, Heather S Feigelson, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Florentia Fostira, Asta Försti, George Fountzilas, Susan M Gerty, , Graham G Giles, Andrew K Godwin, Paul Goodfellow, Nikki Graham, Dario Greco, Ute Hamann, Susan E Hankinson, Arndt Hartmann, Rebecca Hein, Judith Heinz, Andrea Holbrook, Robert N Hoover, Jennifer J Hu, David J Hunter, Sue A Ingles, Astrid Irwanto, Jennifer Ivanovich, Esther M John, Nicola Johnson, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Rudolf Kaaks, Yon-Dschun Ko, Laurence N Kolonel, Irene Konstantopoulou, Veli-Matti Kosma, Swati Kulkarni, Diether Lambrechts, Adam M Lee, Loic Le Marchand, Timothy Lesnick, Jianjun Liu, Sara Lindstrom, Arto Mannermaa, Sara Margolin, Nicholas G Martin, Penelope Miron, Grant W Montgomery, Heli Nevanlinna, Stephan Nickels, Sarah Nyante, Curtis Olswold, Julie Palmer, Harsh Pathak, Dimitrios Pectasides, Charles M Perou, Julian Peto, Paul D P Pharoah, Loreall C Pooler, Michael F Press, Katri Pylkäs, Timothy R Rebbeck, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Lynn Rosenberg, Eric Ross, Thomas Rüdiger, Isabel dos Santos Silva, Elinor Sawyer, Marjanka K Schmidt, Rüdiger Schulz-Wendtland, Fredrick Schumacher, Gianluca Severi, Xin Sheng, Lisa B Signorello, Hans-Peter Sinn, Kristen N Stevens, Melissa C Southey, William J Tapper, Ian Tomlinson, Frans B L Hogervorst, Els Wauters, Joellen Weaver, Hans Wildiers, Robert Winqvist, David Van Den Berg, Peggy Wan, Lucy Y Xia, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Wei Zheng, Regina G Ziegler, Afshan Siddiq, Susan L Slager, Daniel O Stram, Douglas Easton, Peter Kraft, Brian E Henderson, Fergus J Couch.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2011
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Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.
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Genome variation: a review of Web resources.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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An enormous number of high-quality Web-based resources are now available to facilitate research into genome variation. Although identification of the most appropriate and informative resources can be challenging, a number of key sites provide links to more specialized resources that may be useful to follow up. Given ongoing research, focussing on the sequencing of many different genomes, we can expect sequence databases and their associated polymorphism-based resources to greatly increase in depth and complexity in a relatively short period of time. However, databases and tools developed to date, and described here, provide a sound basis for accommodating this next generation of genomic data. As well as sequence-oriented resources this review presents databases providing genotypic and common disease phenotype data, copy number variation, genetic maps, cytogenetic data, and gives an overview of key software tools, with the emphasis on analysis of the genetic basis of common disease.
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Composite likelihood-based meta-analysis of breast cancer association studies.
J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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For detecting low risk disease variants in genome-wide association panels, meta-analysis is a powerful strategy to increase power. We apply a composite likelihood-based method, which models association with disease in regions defined on a linkage disequilibrium map and combines the evidence across multiple genome-wide samples. This fixed region approach has the advantage that, as only one statistical test is made per region, there is no increased multiple testing penalty in higher marker density panels. Imputation of missing genotypes is also advantageous to increase coverage. Meta-analysis of three breast cancer data sets combines evidence from samples that show heterogeneity in phenotype and, particularly, in marker coverage. The FGFR2 gene has the highest rank, consistent with previous analysis of one of these samples and supported by the small number of early-onset breast cancer cases included. The 8q24 breast cancer region also ranks highly and is supported by evidence from both early-onset and post-menopausal breast cancer samples. The PIK3AP1 gene region is highlighted in this analysis as a strong candidate for further study.
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Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies.
Xiaohong R Yang, Jenny Chang-Claude, Ellen L Goode, Fergus J Couch, Heli Nevanlinna, Roger L Milne, Mia Gaudet, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Angela Cox, Peter A Fasching, Rebecca Hein, Amanda B Spurdle, Fiona Blows, Kristy Driver, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Judith Heinz, Peter Sinn, Alina Vrieling, Tuomas Heikkinen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Päivi Heikkilä, Carl Blomqvist, Jolanta Lissowska, Beata Peplonska, Stephen Chanock, Jonine Figueroa, Louise Brinton, Per Hall, Kamila Czene, Keith Humphreys, Hatef Darabi, Jianjun Liu, Laura J van 't Veer, Flora E van Leeuwen, Irene L Andrulis, Gord Glendon, Julia A Knight, Anna Marie Mulligan, Frances P O'Malley, Nayana Weerasooriya, Esther M John, Matthias W Beckmann, Arndt Hartmann, Sebastian B Weihbrecht, David L Wachter, Sebastian M Jud, Christian R Loehberg, Laura Baglietto, Dallas R English, Graham G Giles, Catriona A McLean, Gianluca Severi, Diether Lambrechts, Thijs Vandorpe, Caroline Weltens, Robert Paridaens, Ann Smeets, Patrick Neven, Hans Wildiers, Xianshu Wang, Janet E Olson, Victoria Cafourek, Zachary Fredericksen, Matthew Kosel, Celine Vachon, Helen E Cramp, Daniel Connley, Simon S Cross, Sabapathy P Balasubramanian, Malcolm W R Reed, Thilo Dörk, Michael Bremer, Andreas Meyer, Johann H Karstens, Aysun Ay, Tjoung-Won Park-Simon, Peter Hillemanns, José Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez Rodríguez, Pilar Zamora, Javier Benitez, Yon-Dschun Ko, Hans-Peter Fischer, Ute Hamann, Beate Pesch, Thomas Brüning, Christina Justenhoven, Hiltrud Brauch, Diana M Eccles, William J Tapper, Sue M Gerty, Elinor J Sawyer, Ian P Tomlinson, Angela Jones, Michael Kerin, Nicola Miller, Niall McInerney, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Show-Lin Yang, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Shou-Tung Chen, Giu-Cheng Hsu, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Loic Le Marchand, Laurence N Kolonel, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Tomasz Huzarski, Tomasz Byrski, Bohdan Górski, Jacek Gronwald, Maartje J Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Agnes Jager, Mieke Kriege, Madeleine M A Tilanus-Linthorst, Margriet Collée, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Kari Mononen, Mervi Grip, Pasi Hirvikoski, Robert Winqvist, Arto Mannermaa, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana Kauppinen, Vesa Kataja, Päivi Auvinen, Ylermi Soini, Reijo Sironen, Stig E Bojesen, David Dynnes Ørsted, Diljit Kaur-Knudsen, Henrik Flyger, Børge G Nordestgaard, Helene Holland, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Siranoush Manoukian, Monica Barile, Paolo Radice, Susan E Hankinson, David J Hunter, Rulla Tamimi, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Fabrice Odefrey, Valerie Gaborieau, Peter Devilee, P E A Huijts, R A E M Tollenaar, C Seynaeve, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, John L Hopper, Fleur Hammet, Helen Tsimiklis, Letitia D Smith, Melissa C Southey, Manjeet K Humphreys, Douglas Easton, Paul Pharoah, Mark E Sherman, Montserrat Garcia-Closas.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2010
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Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.
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Genome-wide association of breast cancer: composite likelihood with imputed genotypes.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2010
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We describe composite likelihood-based analysis of a genome-wide breast cancer case-control sample from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project. We determine 14?380 genome regions of fixed size on a linkage disequilibrium (LD) map, which delimit comparable levels of LD. Although the numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly variable, each region contains an average of ?35 SNPs and an average of ?69 after imputation of missing genotypes. Composite likelihood association mapping yields a single P-value for each region, established by a permutation test, along with a maximum likelihood disease location, SE and information weight. For single SNP analysis, the nominal P-value for the most significant SNP (msSNP) requires substantial correction given the number of SNPs in the region. Therefore, imputing genotypes may not always be advantageous for the msSNP test, in contrast to composite likelihood. For the region containing FGFR2 (a known breast cancer gene) the largest ?(2) is obtained under composite likelihood with imputed genotypes (?(2)(2) increases from 20.6 to 22.7), and compares with a single SNP-based ?(2)(2) of 19.9 after correction. Imputation of additional genotypes in this region reduces the size of the 95% confidence interval for location of the disease gene by ?40%. Among the highest ranked regions, SNPs in the NTSR1 gene would be worthy of examination in additional samples. Meta-analysis, which combines weighted evidence from composite likelihood in different samples, and refines putative disease locations, is facilitated through defining fixed regions on an underlying LD map.
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The influence of common polymorphisms on breast cancer.
Cancer Treat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2010
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Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in the Western world and a significant cause of mortality worldwide. A small proportion of cases are accounted for by high-penetrance monogenic predisposition genes; however, this explains only a small fraction (less than 5%) of all breast cancers. Increasingly with advances in molecular technology and the development of large research consortia, the locations and identities of many low-penetrance genetic variants are being discovered. However, each variant has a very small effect similar to or smaller than many of the known environmental risk factors. It is therefore unlikely that these variants will be appropriate for predictive genetic testing, although they may identify novel pathways and genes which provide new insights and targets for therapeutic intervention. The future challenges will be identifying causal variants and determining how these low-penetrance alleles interact with each other and with environmental factors in order to usefully implement them in the practice of clinical medicine. Furthermore, it is clear that breast cancer comes in many forms with the tumour pathology and immunohistochemical profile already being used routinely as prognostic indicators and to inform treatment decisions. However, these indicators of prognosis are imperfect; two apparently identical tumours may have very different outcomes in different individuals. Inherited genetic variants may well be one of the other factors that need to be taken into account in assessing prognosis and planning treatment.
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Genome-wide association study identifies five new breast cancer susceptibility loci.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries. To identify common breast cancer susceptibility alleles, we conducted a genome-wide association study in which 582,886 SNPs were genotyped in 3,659 cases with a family history of the disease and 4,897 controls. Promising associations were evaluated in a second stage, comprising 12,576 cases and 12,223 controls. We identified five new susceptibility loci, on chromosomes 9, 10 and 11 (P = 4.6 x 10(-7) to P = 3.2 x 10(-15)). We also identified SNPs in the 6q25.1 (rs3757318, P = 2.9 x 10(-6)), 8q24 (rs1562430, P = 5.8 x 10(-7)) and LSP1 (rs909116, P = 7.3 x 10(-7)) regions that showed more significant association with risk than those reported previously. Previously identified breast cancer susceptibility loci were also found to show larger effect sizes in this study of familial breast cancer cases than in previous population-based studies, consistent with polygenic susceptibility to the disease.
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A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population.
Antonis C Antoniou, Xianshu Wang, Zachary S Fredericksen, Lesley McGuffog, Robert Tarrell, Olga M Sinilnikova, Sue Healey, Jonathan Morrison, Christiana Kartsonaki, Timothy Lesnick, Maya Ghoussaini, Daniel Barrowdale, , Susan Peock, Margaret Cook, Clare Oliver, Debra Frost, Diana Eccles, D Gareth Evans, Ros Eeles, Louise Izatt, Carol Chu, Fiona Douglas, Joan Paterson, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Claude Houdayer, Sylvie Mazoyer, Sophie Giraud, Christine Lasset, Audrey Remenieras, Olivier Caron, Agnès Hardouin, Pascaline Berthet, Frans B L Hogervorst, Matti A Rookus, Agnes Jager, Ans van den Ouweland, Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Rob B van der Luijt, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, Encarna B Gomez Garcia, Peter Devilee, Maaike P G Vreeswijk, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Jacek Gronwald, Tomasz Huzarski, Tomasz Byrski, Bohdan Górski, Cezary Cybulski, Amanda B Spurdle, Helene Holland, David E Goldgar, Esther M John, John L Hopper, Melissa Southey, Saundra S Buys, Mary B Daly, Mary-Beth Terry, Rita K Schmutzler, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Christoph Engel, Alfons Meindl, Sabine Preisler-Adams, Norbert Arnold, Dieter Niederacher, Christian Sutter, Susan M Domchek, Katherine L Nathanson, Timothy Rebbeck, Joanne L Blum, Marion Piedmonte, Gustavo C Rodriguez, Katie Wakeley, John F Boggess, Jack Basil, Stephanie V Blank, Eitan Friedman, Bella Kaufman, Yael Laitman, Roni Milgrom, Irene L Andrulis, Gord Glendon, Hilmi Ozcelik, Tomas Kirchhoff, Joseph Vijai, Mia M Gaudet, David Altshuler, Candace Guiducci, Niklas Loman, Katja Harbst, Johanna Rantala, Hans Ehrencrona, Anne-Marie Gerdes, Mads Thomassen, Lone Sunde, Paolo Peterlongo, Siranoush Manoukian, Bernardo Bonanni, Alessandra Viel, Paolo Radice, Trinidad Caldés, Miguel de la Hoya, Christian F Singer, Anneliese Fink-Retter, Mark H Greene, Phuong L Mai, Jennifer T Loud, Lucia Guidugli, Noralane M Lindor, Thomas V O Hansen, Finn C Nielsen, Ignacio Blanco, Conxi Lazaro, Judy Garber, Susan J Ramus, Simon A Gayther, Catherine Phelan, Stephen Narod, Csilla I Szabo, Javier Benitez, Ana Osorio, Heli Nevanlinna, Tuomas Heikkinen, Maria A Caligo, Mary S Beattie, Ute Hamann, Andrew K Godwin, Marco Montagna, Cinzia Casella, Susan L Neuhausen, Beth Y Karlan, Nadine Tung, Amanda E Toland, Jeffrey Weitzel, Olofunmilayo Olopade, Jacques Simard, Penny Soucy, Wendy S Rubinstein, Adalgeir Arason, Gad Rennert, Nicholas G Martin, Grant W Montgomery, Jenny Chang-Claude, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Hiltrud Brauch, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Penelope Miron, Sue M Gerty, William Tapper, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, George Fountzilas, Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Julian Peto, Diether Lambrechts, Robert Paridaens, Thomas Rüdiger, Asta Försti, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Robert B Diasio, Adam M Lee, Jeanette Eckel-Passow, Celine Vachon, Fiona Blows, Kristy Driver, Alison Dunning, Paul P D Pharoah, Kenneth Offit, V Shane Pankratz, Hakon Hakonarson, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Douglas F Easton, Fergus J Couch.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2010
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Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer diagnosis over age 35. We took forward 96 SNPs for replication in another 5,986 BRCA1 carriers (2,974 individuals with breast cancer and 3,012 unaffected individuals). Five SNPs on 19p13 were associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) = 2.3 × 10?? to P(trend) = 3.9 × 10??), two of which showed independent associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.83, 95% CI 0.75-0.92, P(trend) = 0.0003) and an association with estrogen receptor-positive disease in the opposite direction (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.14, P(trend) = 0.016). The five SNPs were also associated with triple-negative breast cancer in a separate study of 2,301 triple-negative cases and 3,949 controls (P(trend) = 1 × 10??) to P(trend) = 8 × 10??; rs2363956 per-allele OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.74-0.87, P(trend) = 1.1 × 10??
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The JAK2 46/1 haplotype predisposes to MPL-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2010
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The 46/1 JAK2 haplotype predisposes to V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the underlying mechanism is obscure. We analyzed essential thrombocythemia patients entered into the PT-1 studies and, as expected, found that 46/1 was overrepresented in V617F-positive cases (n = 404) versus controls (n = 1492, P = 3.9 x 10(-11)). The 46/1 haplotype was also overrepresented in cases without V617F (n = 347, P = .009), with an excess seen for both MPL exon 10 mutated and V617F, MPL exon 10 nonmutated cases. Analysis of further MPL-positive, V617F-negative cases confirmed an excess of 46/1 (n = 176, P = .002), but no association between MPL mutations and MPL haplotype was seen. An excess of 46/1 was also seen in JAK2 exon 12 mutated cases (n = 69, P = .002), and these mutations preferentially arose on the 46/1 chromosome (P = .029). No association between 46/1 and clinical or laboratory features was seen in the PT-1 cohort either with or without V617F. The excess of 46/1 in JAK2 exon 12 cases is compatible with both the "hypermutability" and "fertile ground" hypotheses, but the excess in MPL-mutated cases argues against the former. No difference in sequence, splicing, or expression of JAK2 was found on 46/1 compared with other haplotypes, suggesting that any functional difference of JAK2 on 46/1, if it exists, must be relatively subtle.
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Mutations in phospholipase C epsilon 1 are not sufficient to cause diffuse mesangial sclerosis.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2009
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Diffuse mesangial sclerosis occurs as an isolated abnormality or as a part of a syndrome. Recently, mutations in phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) were found to cause a nonsyndromic, autosomal recessive form of this disease. Here we describe three children from one consanguineous kindred of Pakistani origin with diffuse mesangial sclerosis who presented with congenital or infantile nephrotic syndrome. Homozygous mutations in PLCE1 (also known as KIAA1516, PLCE, or NPHS3) were identified following genome-wide mapping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. All affected children were homozygous for a four-basepair deletion in exon 3, which created a premature translational stop codon. Analysis of the asymptomatic father of two of the children revealed that he was also homozygous for the same mutation. We conclude this nonpenetrance may be due to compensatory mutations at a second locus and that mutation within PLCE1 is not always sufficient to cause diffuse mesangial sclerosis.
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Recurrent SETBP1 mutations in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia.
Nat. Genet.
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Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) shares clinical and laboratory features with CML, but it lacks the BCR-ABL1 fusion. We performed exome sequencing of eight aCMLs and identified somatic alterations of SETBP1 (encoding a p.Gly870Ser alteration) in two cases. Targeted resequencing of 70 aCMLs, 574 diverse hematological malignancies and 344 cancer cell lines identified SETBP1 mutations in 24 cases, including 17 of 70 aCMLs (24.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 16-35%). Most mutations (92%) were located between codons 858 and 871 and were identical to changes seen in individuals with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Individuals with mutations had higher white blood cell counts (P = 0.008) and worse prognosis (P = 0.01). The p.Gly870Ser alteration abrogated a site for ubiquitination, and cells exogenously expressing this mutant exhibited higher amounts of SETBP1 and SET protein, lower PP2A activity and higher proliferation rates relative to those expressing the wild-type protein. In summary, mutated SETBP1 represents a newly discovered oncogene present in aCML and closely related diseases.
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Exome-based linkage disequilibrium maps of individual genes: functional clustering and relationship to disease.
Hum. Genet.
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Exome sequencing identifies thousands of DNA variants and a proportion of these are involved in disease. Genotypes derived from exome sequences provide particularly high-resolution coverage enabling study of the linkage disequilibrium structure of individual genes. The extent and strength of linkage disequilibrium reflects the combined influences of mutation, recombination, selection and population history. By constructing linkage disequilibrium maps of individual genes, we show that genes containing OMIM-listed disease variants are significantly under-represented amongst genes with complete or very strong linkage disequilibrium (P = 0.0004). In contrast, genes with disease variants are significantly over-represented amongst genes with levels of linkage disequilibrium close to the average for genes not known to contain disease variants (P = 0.0038). Functional clustering reveals, amongst genes with particularly strong linkage disequilibrium, significant enrichment of essential biological functions (e.g. phosphorylation, cell division, cellular transport and metabolic processes). Strong linkage disequilibrium, corresponding to reduced haplotype diversity, may reflect selection in utero against deleterious mutations which have profound impact on the function of essential genes. Genes with very weak linkage disequilibrium show enrichment of functions requiring greater allelic diversity (e.g. sensory perception and immune response). This category is not enriched for genes containing disease variation. In contrast, there is significant enrichment of genes containing disease variants amongst genes with more average levels of linkage disequilibrium. Mutations in these genes may less likely lead to in utero lethality and be subject to less intense selection.
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A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11.
Afshan Siddiq, Fergus J Couch, Gary K Chen, Sara Lindstrom, Diana Eccles, Robert C Millikan, Kyriaki Michailidou, Daniel O Stram, Lars Beckmann, Suhn Kyong Rhie, Christine B Ambrosone, Kristiina Aittomäki, Pilar Amiano, Carmel Apicella, , Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Matthias W Beckmann, Christine D Berg, Leslie Bernstein, Carl Blomqvist, Hiltrud Brauch, Louise Brinton, Quang M Bui, Julie E Buring, Saundra S Buys, Daniele Campa, Jane E Carpenter, Daniel I Chasman, Jenny Chang-Claude, Constance Chen, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Kamila Czene, Sandra L Deming, Robert B Diasio, W Ryan Diver, Alison M Dunning, Lorraine Durcan, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Laura Fejerman, Jonine D Figueroa, Olivia Fletcher, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Mia M Gaudet, Susan M Gerty, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Graham G Giles, Carla H van Gils, Andrew K Godwin, Nikki Graham, Dario Greco, Per Hall, Susan E Hankinson, Arndt Hartmann, Rebecca Hein, Judith Heinz, Robert N Hoover, John L Hopper, Jennifer J Hu, Scott Huntsman, Sue A Ingles, Astrid Irwanto, Claudine Isaacs, Kevin B Jacobs, Esther M John, Christina Justenhoven, Rudolf Kaaks, Laurence N Kolonel, Gerhard A Coetzee, Mark Lathrop, Loic Le Marchand, Adam M Lee, I-Min Lee, Timothy Lesnick, Peter Lichtner, Jianjun Liu, Eiliv Lund, Enes Makalic, Nicholas G Martin, Catriona A McLean, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, Alfons Meindl, Penelope Miron, Kristine R Monroe, Grant W Montgomery, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Stefan Nickels, Sarah J Nyante, Curtis Olswold, Kim Overvad, Domenico Palli, Daniel J Park, Julie R Palmer, Harsh Pathak, Julian Peto, Paul Pharoah, Nazneen Rahman, Fernando Rivadeneira, Daniel F Schmidt, Rita K Schmutzler, Susan Slager, Melissa C Southey, Kristen N Stevens, Hans-Peter Sinn, Michael F Press, Eric Ross, Elio Riboli, Paul M Ridker, Fredrick R Schumacher, Gianluca Severi, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Jennifer Stone, Malin Sund, William J Tapper, Michael J Thun, Ruth C Travis, Clare Turnbull, André G Uitterlinden, Quinten Waisfisz, Xianshu Wang, Zhaoming Wang, Joellen Weaver, Rüdiger Schulz-Wendtland, Lynne R Wilkens, David Van Den Berg, Wei Zheng, Regina G Ziegler, Elad Ziv, Heli Nevanlinna, Douglas F Easton, David J Hunter, Brian E Henderson, Stephen J Chanock, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Peter Kraft, Christopher A Haiman, Celine M Vachon.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ? 1 × 10(-5) in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10(-8)) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10(-6)) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10(-5)) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10(-7)) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.
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Next generation exome sequencing of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients identifies rare and novel variants in candidate genes.
Gut
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Multiple genes have been implicated by association studies in altering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predisposition. Paediatric patients often manifest more extensive disease and a particularly severe disease course. It is likely that genetic predisposition plays a more substantial role in this group.
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