JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effect of edaravone on radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy: a randomized controlled trial.
J. Neurooncol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Excessive generation of free radicals plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury. This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, on radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Eligible patients were randomized 1:1 to the control group and the edaravone group (intravenous 30 mg twice per day for 2 weeks). Both groups received intravenous conventional steroid therapy and were monitored by brain MRI and LENT/SOMA scales prior to the entry of the trial and at 3-months after completing the trial. The primary end point was a 3-month response rate of the proportional changes determined by MRI. The trial is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01865201. Between 2009 and 2012, we enrolled 154 patients. Of whom 137 were eligible for analysis. The volumes of necrosis estimated on T2-weighted image showed that 55.6 % edaravone-treated patients (40 out of 72) showed edema decreases ?25 %, which was significantly higher than that in the control group (35.4 %, 23 out of 65, p = 0.025). Forty-four patients treated with edaravone (61.1 %) reported improvement in neurologic symptoms and signs evaluated by LENT/SOMA scales, while the rate was 38.5 % in the control group (p = 0.006). MRI of the edaravone group showed a significant decrease in area of T1-weighted contrast enhancement (1.67 ± 4.69 cm(2), p = 0.004) and the T2-weighted edema (5.08 ± 10.32 cm(2), p = 0.000). Moreover, compared with those in control group, patients with edaravone exhibited significantly better radiological improvement measured by T2-weighted image (p = 0.042). Administration of edaravone, in adjunct to steroid regimen, might provide a better outcome in patients with radiation-induced brain necrosis.
Related JoVE Video
Hypokalemia in patients with cough mixture abuse: a retrospective chart review.
J Addict Med
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In past 2 decades, nonmedical consumption of cough mixture has become a serious social problem in certain regions of China. Cough mixture abuse causes psychiatric symptoms. Moreover, there has been an increasing concern about the physical disorders associated with cough mixture abuse.
Related JoVE Video
Effects of early blood pressure lowering on early and long-term outcomes after acute stroke: an updated meta-analysis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hypertension is common after acute stroke onset. Previous studies showed controversial effects of early blood pressure (BP) lowering on stroke outcomes. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of early BP lowering on early and long-term outcomes after acute stroke.
Related JoVE Video
Neurosurgery and prognosis in patients with radiation-induced brain injury after nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy: a follow-up study.
Radiat Oncol
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Radiotherapy is the standard radical treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and may cause radiation-induced brain injury (RI). Treatment for RI remains a challenge. We conducted this study to investigate the indications of neurosurgery, operation time and prognosis of patients with RI after NPC radiotherapy who underwent neurosurgical management.
Related JoVE Video
Epilepsy related to radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Radiotherapy is the standard radical treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and may cause radiation encephalopathy (RE). To investigate the characteristics of epilepsy in RE after NPC radiotherapy, we observed 101 RE patients after NPC radiotherapy during a 5-year study period. Seizure semiology, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG) were studied. We found that epilepsy is a common symptom in these patients, with an incidence of 15.8%. In the variables of age, sex, post-radiotherapy interval, radiation dose, radiotherapy techniques, and radiation field, there were no significant differences between RE patients with and without epilepsy. Furthermore, we investigated seizure semiology and EEG records in RE patients with epilepsy, and found that generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS) was the most common type. Cystic lesions in temporal lobes in MRI were more common in RE patients with epilepsy (18.74%), as compared with RE patients without epilepsy (9.41%).
Related JoVE Video
Clipping versus coiling for ruptured intracranial aneurysms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Stroke
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Endovascular treatment has increasingly been used for aneurismal subarachnoid aneurismal hemorrhage. The aim of this analysis is to assess the current evidence regarding safety and efficiency of clipping compared with coiling.
Related JoVE Video
A study of radiation-induced cerebral vascular injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To investigate radiation-induced carotid and cerebral vascular injury and its relationship with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients.
Related JoVE Video
Psychological disorders, cognitive dysfunction and quality of life in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced brain injury.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To evaluate factors affecting psychology, cognitive function and quality of life (QOL) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with radiation-induced brain injury (RI).
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.