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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Rabeprazole exhibits antiproliferative effects on human gastric cancer cell lines.
Oncol Lett
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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Intracellular proton extrusion in gastric cancer cells has been reported to promote cancer cell survival under acidic conditions via hydrogen/potassium adenosine triphosphatase (H(+)/K(+)-ATPase). Rabeprazole is a frequently used second-generation proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that irreversibly inactivates gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Therefore, we hypothesized that rabeprazole could reduce the viability of gastric cancer cells. In the present study, four human gastric cancer cell lines and one non-cancer gastric cell line were cultured. Cell viability, the ?- and ?-subunits of H(+)/K(+)-ATPase and cellular apoptosis were analyzed by dye exclusion assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, respectively. The expression level of total extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) and phosphorylated-ERK protein was detected by western blot analysis. Gastric cancer cell lines were more tolerant of the acidic culture media than non-cancer cells. Administration of rabeprazole led to a marked decrease in the viability of MKN-28 cells. Exposure to rabeprazole induced significant apoptosis in AGS cells. Rabeprazole completely inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the MKN-28 cells, whereas the same effect was not observed in either the KATO III or MKN-45 cells. The ERK 1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, attenuated the viability of the AGS cells. A similar antiproliferative effect was observed in the rabeprazole treatment group. In addition, PD98059 and rabeprazole were able to efficaciously inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the gastric cancer cells. Therefore, it was concluded that rabeprazole can attenuate the cell viability of human gastric cancer cells through inactivation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The results of the present study demonstrate that rabeprazole inhibits the viability of gastric cancer cells in vitro and may serve as a novel antineoplastic agent.
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ADAR-mediated RNA editing in non-coding RNA sequences.
Sci China Life Sci
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2013
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Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is the most abundant editing event in animals. It converts adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA regions through the action of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) proteins. Editing of pre-mRNA coding regions can alter the protein codon and increase functional diversity. However, most of the A-to-I editing sites occur in the non-coding regions of pre-mRNA or mRNA and non-coding RNAs. Untranslated regions (UTRs) and introns are located in pre-mRNA non-coding regions, thus A-to-I editing can influence gene expression by nuclear retention, degradation, alternative splicing, and translation regulation. Non-coding RNAs such as microRNA (miRNA), small interfering RNA (siRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) are related to pre-mRNA splicing, translation, and gene regulation. A-to-I editing could therefore affect the stability, biogenesis, and target recognition of non-coding RNAs. Finally, it may influence the function of non-coding RNAs, resulting in regulation of gene expression. This review focuses on the function of ADAR-mediated RNA editing on mRNA non-coding regions (UTRs and introns) and non-coding RNAs (miRNA, siRNA, and lncRNA).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.