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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impaired Mitochondrial Function and Reduced Energy Cost as a Result of Muscle Damage.
Med Sci Sports Exerc
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2014
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Although it has been largely acknowledged that isometric neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) exercise induces larger muscle damage than voluntary contractions, the corresponding effects on muscle energetics remains to be determined. Voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has been reported to have minor slight effects on muscle metabolic response to subsequent dynamic exercise but the magnitude of muscle energetics alterations for NMES EIMD has never been documented.
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Localized Metabolic and T2 Changes Induced by Voluntary and Evoked Contractions.
Med Sci Sports Exerc
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2014
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This study compared the metabolic and activation changes induced by electrically-evoked (NMES) and voluntary (VOL) contractions performed at the same submaximal intensity using P chemical shift imaging (CSI) and T2 mapping investigations.
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Evidence of Preserved Oxidative Capacity and Oxygen Delivery in the Plantar Flexor Muscles With Age.
J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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Studies examining the effect of aging on skeletal muscle oxidative capacity have yielded equivocal results; however, these investigations may have been confounded by differences in oxygen (O2) delivery, physical activity, and small numbers of participants. Therefore, we evaluated skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and O2 delivery in a relatively large group (N = 40) of young (22 ± 2 years) and old (73 ± 7 years) participants matched for physical activity. After submaximal dynamic plantar flexion exercise, phosphocreatine (PCr) resynthesis ((31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy), muscle reoxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy), and popliteal artery blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) were measured. The phosphocreatine recovery time constant (Tau) (young: 33 ± 16; old: 30 ± 11 seconds), maximal rate of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis (young: 25 ± 9; old: 27 ± 8 mM/min), and muscle reoxygenation rates determined by the deoxyhemoglobin/myoglobin recovery Tau (young: 48 ± 5; old: 47 ± 9 seconds) were similar between groups. Similarly, although tending to be higher in the old, there were no significant age-related differences in postexercise popliteal blood flow (area under the curve: young: 1,665 ± 227 vs old: 2,404 ± 357mL, p = .06) and convective O2 delivery (young: 293 ± 146 vs old: 404 ± 191 mL, p = .07). In conclusion, when physical activity and O2 delivery are similar, oxidative capacity in the plantar flexors is not affected by aging. These findings reveal that diminished skeletal muscle oxidative capacity is not an obligatory accompaniment to the aging process.
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A single intake of capsiate improves mechanical performance and bioenergetics efficiency in contracting mouse skeletal muscle.
Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2014
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Capsiate is known to increase whole body oxygen consumption possibly via the activation of uncoupling processes, but its effect at the skeletal muscle level remains poorly documented and conflicting. To clarify this issue, gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics were investigated in mice 2 h after a single intake of either vehicle (control) or purified capsiate (at 10 or 100 mg/kg body wt) through a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements. Mechanical performance and energy pathway fluxes were assessed strictly noninvasively during a standardized electrostimulation-induced exercise, using an original device implementing 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mitochondrial respiration was evaluated in isolated saponin-permeabilized fibers. Compared with control, both capsiate doses produced quantitatively similar effects at the energy metabolism level, including an about twofold decrease of the mitochondrial respiration sensitivity for ADP. Interestingly, they did not alter either oxidative phosphorylation or uncoupling protein 3 gene expression at rest. During 6 min of maximal repeated isometric contractions, both doses reduced the amount of ATP produced from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation but increased the relative contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to total energy turnover (+28 and +21% in the 10- and 100-mg groups, respectively). ATP cost of twitch force generation was further reduced in the 10- (-35%) and 100-mg (-45%) groups. Besides, the highest capsiate dose also increased the twitch force-generating capacity. These data present capsiate as a helpful candidate to enhance both muscle performance and oxidative phosphorylation during exercise, which could constitute a nutritional approach for improving health and preventing obesity and associated metabolic disorders.
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Fast water concentration mapping to normalize (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging.
MAGMA
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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To propose a fast and robust acquisition and post-processing pipeline that is time-compatible with clinical explorations to obtain a proton density (?) map used as a reference for metabolic map normalization. This allows inter-subject and inter-group comparisons of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data and longitudinal follow-up for single subjects.
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Hemi-spectrum substitution after water signal fitting (HESWAF): an improvement of the modulus post-processing of MR spectra.
MAGMA
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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In a previous study, we have shown that modulus post-processing is a simple and efficient tool to both phase correct and frequency align magnetic resonance (MR) spectra automatically. Furthermore, this technique also eliminates sidebands and phase distortions. The advantages of the modulus technique have been illustrated in several applications to brain proton MR spectroscopy. Two possible drawbacks have also been pointed out. The first one is the theoretical decrease in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by a factor up to ?2 when comparing the spectrum obtained after modulus versus conventional post-processing. The second pitfall results from the symmetrization of the spectrum induced by modulus post-processing, since any resonance or artifact located at the left of the water resonance is duplicated at the right of the water resonance, thus contaminating the region of the spectrum containing the resonances of interest. Herein, we propose a strategy in order to eliminate these two limitations.
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Alterations at the cross-bridge level are associated with a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Nemaline myopathy is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. The first disease causing mutation (Met9Arg) was identified in the gene encoding ?-tropomyosin slow gene (TPM3). Considering the conflicting findings of the previous studies on the transgenic (Tg) mice carrying the TPM3Met9Arg mutation, we investigated carefully the effect of the Met9Arg mutation in 8-9 month-old Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice on muscle function using a multiscale methodological approach including skinned muscle fibers analysis and in vivo investigations by magnetic resonance imaging and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. While in vitro maximal force production was reduced in Tg(TPM3)Met9Arg mice as compared to controls, in vivo measurements revealed an improved mechanical performance in the transgenic mice as compared to the former. The reduced in vitro muscle force might be related to alterations occurring at the cross-bridges level with muscle-specific underlying mechanisms. In vivo muscle improvement was not associated with any changes in either muscle volume or energy metabolism. Our findings indicate that TPM3(Met9Arg) mutation leads to a mild muscle weakness in vitro related to an alteration at the cross-bridges level and a paradoxical gain of muscle function in vivo. These results clearly point out that in vitro alterations are muscle-dependent and do not necessarily translate into similar changes in vivo.
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Mitochondrial function and increased convective O2 transport: implications for the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in vivo.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2013
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Although phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS)-based evidence suggests that in vivo peak mitochondrial respiration rate in young untrained adults is limited by the intrinsic mitochondrial capacity of ATP synthesis, it remains unknown whether a large, locally targeted increase in convective O2 delivery would alter this interpretation. Consequently, we examined the effect of superimposing reactive hyperemia (RH), induced by a period of brief ischemia during the last minute of exercise, on oxygen delivery and mitochondrial function in the calf muscle of nine young adults compared with free-flow conditions (FF). To this aim, we used an integrative experimental approach combining 31P-MRS, Doppler ultrasound imaging, and near-infrared spectroscopy. Limb blood flow [area under the curve (AUC), 1.4 ± 0.8 liters in FF and 2.5 ± 0.3 liters in RH, P < 0.01] and convective O2 delivery (AUC, 0.30 ± 0.16 liters in FF and 0.54 ± 0.05 liters in RH, P < 0.01), were significantly increased in RH compared with FF. RH was also associated with significantly higher capillary blood flow (P < 0.05) and faster tissue reoxygenation mean response times (70 ± 15 s in FF and 24 ± 15 s in RH, P < 0.05). This resulted in a 43% increase in estimated peak mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate (29 ± 13 mM/min in FF and 41 ± 14 mM/min in RH, P < 0.05) whereas the phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery time constant in RH was not significantly different (P = 0.22). This comprehensive assessment of local skeletal muscle O2 availability and utilization in untrained subjects reveals that mitochondrial function, assessed in vivo by 31P-MRS, is limited by convective O2 delivery rather than an intrinsic mitochondrial limitation.
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Quantitative in vivo characterization of intracellular and extracellular pH profiles in heterogeneous tumors: a novel method enabling multiparametric pH analysis.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2013
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Acid production and transport are currently being studied to identify new targets for efficient cancer treatment, as subpopulations of tumor cells frequently escape conventional therapy owing to their particularly acidic tumor microenvironment. Heterogeneity in intracellular and extracellular tumor pH (pHi, pHe) has been reported, but none of the methods currently available for measuring tissue pH provides quantitative parameters characterizing pH distribution profiles in tissues. To this intent, we present here a multiparametric, noninvasive approach based on in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and its application to mouse tumor xenografts. First, localized (31)P NMR spectrum signals of pHi and pHe reporter molecules [inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 3-aminopropylphosphonate (3-APP), respectively] were transformed into pH curves using established algorithms. Although Pi is an endogenous compound, 3-APP had to be injected intraperitoneally. Then, we developed algorithms for the calculation of six to eight quantitative pH parameters from the digital points of each pH curve obtained. For this purpose, each pH distribution profile was approximated as a histogram, and intensities were corrected for the nonlinearity between chemical-shift and pH.
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FID modulus: a simple and efficient technique to phase and align MR spectra.
MAGMA
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
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The post-processing of MR spectroscopic data requires several steps more or less easy to automate, including the phase correction and the chemical shift assignment. First, since the absolute phase is unknown, one of the difficulties the MR spectroscopist has to face is the determination of the correct phase correction. When only a few spectra have to be processed, this is usually performed manually. However, this correction needs to be automated as soon as a large number of spectra is involved, like in the case of phase coherent averaging or when the signals collected with phased array coils have to be combined. A second post-processing requirement is the frequency axis assignment. In standard mono-voxel MR spectroscopy, this can also be easily performed manually, by simply assigning a frequency value to a well-known resonance (e.g. the water or NAA resonance in the case of brain spectroscopy). However, when the correction of a frequency shift is required before averaging a large amount of spectra (due to B 0 spatial inhomogeneities in chemical shift imaging, or resulting from motion for example), this post-processing definitely needs to be performed automatically.
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Multimodal MRI and (31)P-MRS investigations of the ACTA1(Asp286Gly) mouse model of nemaline myopathy provide evidence of impaired in vivo muscle function, altered muscle structure and disturbed energy metabolism.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nemaline myopathy (NM), the most common non-dystrophic congenital disease of skeletal muscle, can be caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle ?-actin gene (ACTA1) (~25% of all NM cases and up to 50% of severe forms of NM). Muscle function of the recently generated transgenic mouse model carrying the human Asp286Gly mutation in the ACTA1 gene (Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly)) has been mainly investigated in vitro. Therefore, we aimed at providing a comprehensive picture of the in vivo hindlimb muscle function of Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly) mice by combining strictly noninvasive investigations. Skeletal muscle anatomy (hindlimb muscles, intramuscular fat volumes) and microstructure were studied using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (Dixon, T2, Diffusion Tensor Imaging [DTI]). Energy metabolism was studied using 31-phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Skeletal muscle contractile performance was investigated while applying a force-frequency protocol (1-150 Hz) and a fatigue protocol (6 min-1.7 Hz). Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly) mice showed a mild muscle weakness as illustrated by the reduction of both absolute (30%) and specific (15%) maximal force production. Dixon MRI did not show discernable fatty infiltration in Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly) mice indicating that this mouse model does not reproduce human MRI findings. Increased T2 values were observed in Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly) mice and might reflect the occurrence of muscle degeneration/regeneration process. Interestingly, T2 values were linearly related to muscle weakness. DTI experiments indicated lower ?2 and ?3 values in Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly) mice, which might be associated to muscle atrophy and/or the presence of histological anomalies. Finally (31)P-MRS investigations illustrated an increased anaerobic energy cost of contraction in Tg(ACTA1)(Asp286Gly) mice, which might be ascribed to contractile and non-contractile processes. Overall, we provide a unique set of information about the anatomic, metabolic and functional consequences of the Asp286Gly mutation that might be considered as relevant biomarkers for monitoring the severity and/or the progression of NM and for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions.
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Combined MRI and ³¹P-MRS investigations of the ACTA1(H40Y) mouse model of nemaline myopathy show impaired muscle function and altered energy metabolism.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nemaline myopathy (NM) is the most common disease entity among non-dystrophic skeletal muscle congenital diseases. Mutations in the skeletal muscle ?-actin gene (ACTA1) account for ?25% of all NM cases and are the most frequent cause of severe forms of NM. So far, the mechanisms underlying muscle weakness in NM patients remain unclear. Additionally, recent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies reported a progressive fatty infiltration of skeletal muscle with a specific muscle involvement in patients with ACTA1 mutations. We investigated strictly noninvasively the gastrocnemius muscle function of a mouse model carrying a mutation in the ACTA1 gene (H40Y). Skeletal muscle anatomy (hindlimb muscles and fat volumes) and energy metabolism were studied using MRI and (31)Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Skeletal muscle contractile performance was investigated while applying a force-frequency protocol (from 1-150 Hz) and a fatigue protocol (80 stimuli at 40 Hz). H40Y mice showed a reduction of both absolute (-40%) and specific (-25%) maximal force production as compared to controls. Interestingly, muscle weakness was associated with an improved resistance to fatigue (+40%) and an increased energy cost. On the contrary, the force frequency relationship was not modified in H40Y mice and the extent of fatty infiltration was minor and not different from the WT group. We concluded that the H40Y mouse model does not reproduce human MRI findings but shows a severe muscle weakness which might be related to an alteration of intrinsic muscular properties. The increased energy cost in H40Y mice might be related to either an impaired mitochondrial function or an alteration at the cross-bridges level. Overall, we provided a unique set of anatomic, metabolic and functional biomarkers that might be relevant for monitoring the progression of NM disease but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions at a preclinical level.
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Improving the classification of brain tumors in mice with perturbation enhanced (PE)-MRSI.
Integr Biol (Camb)
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2011
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Classifiers based on statistical pattern recognition analysis of MRSI data are becoming important tools for the non-invasive diagnosis of human brain tumors. Here we investigate the potential interest of perturbation-enhanced MRSI (PE-MRSI), in this case acute hyperglycemia, for improving the discrimination between mouse brain MRS patterns of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), oligodendroglioma (ODG), and non-tumor brain parenchyma (NT). Six GBM-bearing mice and three ODG-bearing mice were scanned at 7 Tesla by PRESS-MRSI with 12 and 136 ms echo-time, during euglycemia (Eug) and also during induced acute hyperglycemia (Hyp), generating altogether four datasets per animal (echo time + glycemic condition): 12Eug, 136Eug, 12Hyp, and 136Hyp. For classifier development all spectral vectors (spv) selected from the MRSI matrix were unit length normalized (UL2) and used either as a training set (76 GBM spv, four mice; 70 ODG spv, two mice; 54 NT spv) or as an independent testing set (61 GBM spv, two mice; 31 ODG, one mouse; 23 NT spv). All Fishers LDA classifiers obtained were evaluated as far as their descriptive performance-correctly classified cases of the training set (bootstrapping)-and predictive accuracy-balanced error rate of independent testing set classification. MRSI-based classifiers at 12Hyp were consistently more efficient in separating GBM, ODG, and NT regions, with overall accuracies always >80% and up to 95-96%; remaining classifiers were within the 48-85% range. This was also confirmed by user-independent selection of training and testing sets, using leave-one-out (LOO). This highlights the potential interest of perturbation-enhanced MRSI protocols for improving the non-invasive characterization of preclinical brain tumors.
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Effects of a single bout of isometric neuromuscular electrical stimulation on rat gastrocnemius muscle: a combined functional, biochemical and MRI investigation.
J Electromyogr Kinesiol
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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While muscle damage resulting from electrically-induced muscle isometric contractions has been reported in humans, animal studies have failed to illustrate similar deleterious effects and it remains to be determined whether these conflicting results are related to differences regarding experimental procedures or to species. We have investigated in vivo, in rat gastrocnemius muscles, using experimental conditions as close as possible to those used in humans (i.e., muscle length, number of contractions, stimulated muscle), the effects of a single bout of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Maximal tetanic force was measured before, immediately after and 1h and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after NMES. Magnetic resonance imaging measurements, including volume of gastrocnemius muscles and proton transverse relaxation time (T(2)) were performed at baseline and 3, 7, and 14 days after the NMES session. Control animals did not perform any exercise and measurements were recorded at the same time points. For both groups, blood creatine kinase (CK) activity was measured within the first 3 days that followed the initial evaluation. Maximal tetanic force decreased immediately after NMES whereas measurements performed 1h and the days afterwards were similar to the baseline values. CK activity, muscle volume and T(2) values were similar throughout the experimental protocol between the two groups. Under carefully controlled experimental conditions, isometric NMES per se did not induce muscle damage in rat gastrocnemius muscles on the contrary to what has been repeatedly reported in humans. Further experiments would then be warranted in order to clearly delineate these differences and to better understand the physiological events associated with muscle damage resulting from NMES-induced isometric contractions.
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Citrulline malate supplementation increases muscle efficiency in rat skeletal muscle.
Eur. J. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
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Citrulline malate (CM; CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol®) is known to limit the deleterious effect of asthenic state on muscle function, but its effect under healthy condition remains poorly documented. The aim of this longitudinal double-blind study was to investigate the effect of oral ingestion of CM on muscle mechanical performance and bioenergetics in normal rat. Gastrocnemius muscle function was investigated strictly non-invasively using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. A standardized rest-stimulation- (5.7 min of repeated isometric contractions electrically induced by transcutaneous stimulation at a frequency of 3.3 Hz) recovery-protocol was performed twice, i.e., before (t(0)-24 h) and after (t(0)+48 h) CM (3 g/kg/day) or vehicle treatment. CM supplementation did not affect PCr/ATP ratio, [PCr], [Pi], [ATP] and intracellular pH at rest. During the stimulation period, it lead to a 23% enhancement of specific force production that was associated to significant decrease in both PCr (28%) and oxidative (32%) costs of contraction, but had no effect on the time-courses of phosphorylated compounds and intracellular pH. Furthermore, both the rate of PCr resynthesis during the post-stimulation period (VPCr(rec)) and the oxidative ATP synthesis capacity (Q(max)) remained unaffected by CM treatment. These data demonstrate that CM supplementation under healthy condition has an ergogenic effect associated to an improvement of muscular contraction efficiency.
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In vivo pH in metabolic-defective Ras-transformed fibroblast tumors: key role of the monocarboxylate transporter, MCT4, for inducing an alkaline intracellular pH.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
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We present an investigation of tumor pH regulation, designed to support a new anticancer therapy concept that we had previously proposed. Our study uses a tumor model of ras-transformed hamster fibroblasts, CCL39, xenografted in the thighs of nude mice. We demonstrate, for the first time, that genetic modifications of specific mechanisms of proton production and/or proton transport result in distinct, reproducible changes in intracellular and extracellular tumor pH that can be detected and quantified noninvasively in vivo, simultaneously with determinations of tumor energetic status and necrosis in the same experiment. The CCL39 variants used were deficient in the sodium/proton exchanger, NHE-1, and/or in the monocarboxylate transporter, MCT4; further, variants were deficient in glycolysis or respiration. MCT4 expression markedly increased the gradient between intracellular and extracellular pH from 0.14 to 0.43 when compared to CCL39 wild-type tumors not expressing MCT4. The other genetic modifications studied produced smaller but significant increases in intracellular and decreases in extracellular pH. In general, increased pH gradients were paralleled by increased tumor growth performance and diminished necrotic regions, and 50% of the CCL39 variant expressing neither MCT4 nor NHE-1, but possessing full genetic capacity for glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, underwent regression before reaching a 1-cm diameter. Except for CCL39 wild-type tumors, no significant HIF-1? expression was detected. Our in vivo results support a multipronged approach to tumor treatment based on minimizing intracellular pH by targeting several proton production and proton transport processes, among which the very efficient MCT4 proton/lactate co-transport deserves particular attention.
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Muscle energetics changes throughout maturation: a quantitative 31P-MRS analysis.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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We quantified energy production in 7 prepubescent boys (11.7 ± 0.6 yr) and 10 men (35.6 ± 7.8 yr) using (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate whether development affects muscle energetics, given that resistance to fatigue has been reported to be larger before puberty. Each subject performed a finger flexions exercise at 0.7 Hz against a weight adjusted to 15% of their maximal voluntary strength for 3 min, followed by a 15-min recovery period. The total energy cost was similar in both groups throughout the exercise bout, whereas the interplay of the different metabolic pathways was different. At the onset of exercise, children exhibited a higher oxidative contribution (50 ± 15% in boys and 25 ± 8% in men, P < 0.05) to ATP production, whereas the phosphocreatine breakdown contribution was reduced (40 ± 10% in boys and 53 ± 12% in men, P < 0.05), likely as a compensatory mechanism. The anaerobic glycolysis activity was unaffected by maturation. The recovery phase also disclosed differences regarding the rates of proton efflux (6.2 ± 2.5 vs. 3.8 ± 1.9 mM · pH unit(-1) · min(-1), in boys and men, respectively, P < 0.05), and phosphocreatine recovery, which was significantly faster in boys than in men (rate constant of phosphocreatine recovery: 1.3 ± 0.5 vs. 0.7 ± 0.4 min(-1); V(max): 37.5 ± 14.5 vs. 21.1 ± 12.2 mM/min, in boys and men, respectively, P < 0.05). Our results obtained in vivo clearly showed that maturation affects muscle energetics. Children relied more on oxidative metabolism and less on creatine kinase reaction to meet energy demand during exercise. This phenomenon can be explained by a greater oxidative capacity, probably linked to a higher relative content in slow-twitch fibers before puberty.
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Occurrence of neuronal dysfunction during the first 5 years of multiple sclerosis is associated with cognitive deterioration.
J. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2010
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Brain neuronal injury is present in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) from the earliest stage of the disease; however, the functional counterpart of early neuronal injury is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to assess the potential impact of early neuronal dysfunction affecting white matter (WM), grey matter (GM), or the cerebellum on cognitive deterioration and/or EDSS progression during the first 5 years of MS. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) examinations and neuropsychological assessments were performed in 23 patients included after the first clinical attack of MS and 24 healthy controls. The same protocol was performed in patients after a follow-up of 5 years. Metabolic neuronal function was assessed in WM (splenium of corpus callosum), GM (dorsal posterior cingulate cortex), and the cerebellum by evaluating N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels. During follow-up, 39% of patients showed cognitive deterioration and 43% showed a deterioration in their EDSS. Patients with cognitive deterioration had greater NAA level reductions during follow-up in the cerebellum (p = 0.003) and WM (p = 0.02) compared to patients without cognitive deterioration. In addition, patients with cognitive deterioration had higher progression of T2 lesion load (T2LL) during the follow-up period compared to patients without cognitive deterioration (p = 0.03). No differences between patients with and without EDSS progression in terms of NAA levels or T2LL were observed. The present longitudinal study found evidence that, during the first 5 years of MS, cognitive deterioration is associated with the progression of neuronal dysfunction and tissue injury as assessed by MRS and T2LL, respectively.
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A strictly noninvasive MR setup dedicated to longitudinal studies of mechanical performance, bioenergetics, anatomy, and muscle recruitment in contracting mouse skeletal muscle.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2010
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MR techniques have proven their ability to investigate skeletal muscle function in situ. Their benefit in terms of noninvasiveness is, however, lost in animal research, given that muscle stimulation and force output measurements are usually achieved using invasive surgical procedures, thereby excluding repeated investigations in the same animal. This study describes a new setup allowing strictly noninvasive investigations of mouse gastrocnemius muscle function using (1)H-MRI and (31)P-MR spectroscopy. Its originality is to integrate noninvasive systems for inducing muscle contraction through transcutaneous stimulation and for measuring mechanical performance with a dedicated ergometer. In order to test the setup, muscle function was investigated using a fatiguing stimulation protocol (6 min of repeated isometric contractions at 1.7 Hz). T(2)-weighted imaging demonstrated that transcutaneous stimulation mainly activated the gastrocnemius. Moreover, investigations repeated twice with a 7-day interval between bouts did show a high reproducibility in measurements with regard to changes in isometric force and energy metabolism. In conclusion, this setup enables us for the first time to access mechanical performance, energy metabolism, anatomy, and physiology strictly noninvasively in contracting mouse skeletal muscle. The possibility for implementing longitudinal studies opens up new perspectives in many research areas, including ageing, pharmaceutical research, and gene and cell therapy.
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Comparative determination of energy production rates and mitochondrial function using different 31P MRS quantitative methods in sedentary and trained subjects.
NMR Biomed
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2010
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Muscle energetics has been largely and quantitatively investigated using (31)P MRS. Various methods have been used to estimate the corresponding rate of oxidative ATP synthesis (ATP(ox)); however, potential differences among methods have not been investigated. In this study, we aimed to compare the rates of ATP production and energy cost in two groups of subjects with different training status using four different methods: indirect method (method 1), ADP control model (method 2) and phosphate potential control model (method 3). Method 4 was a modified version of method 3 with the introduction of a correction factor allowing for similar values to be obtained for the end-exercise oxidative ATP synthesis rate inferred from exercise measurements and the initial recovery phosphocreatine resynthesis rate. Seven sedentary and seven endurance-trained subjects performed a dynamic standardised rest-exercise-recovery protocol. We quantified the rates of ATP(ox) and anaerobic ATP synthesis (ATP(ana)) using (31)P MRS data recorded at 1.5 T. The rates of ATP(ox) over the entire exercise session were independent of the method used, except for method 4 which provided significantly higher values in both groups (p < 0.01). In addition, methods 1-3 were cross-correlated, thereby confirming their statistical agreement. The rate of ATP(ana) was significantly higher with method 1 (p < 0.01) and lower with method 4 (p < 0.01). As a result of the higher rate of ATP(ox), EC (method 4) calculated over the entire exercise session was higher and initial EC (method 1) was lower in both groups compared with the other methods. We showed in this study that the rate of ATP(ox) was independent of the calculation method, as long as no corrections (method 4) were performed. In contrast, results related to the rates of ATP(ana) were strongly affected by the calculation method and, more exactly, by the estimation of protons generated by ATP(ox). Although the absolute EC values differed between the methods, within- or between-subject comparisons are still valid given the tight relationships between them.
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Echo planar diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse spinal cord at thoracic and lumbar levels: A feasibility study.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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Diffusion tensor imaging is increasingly used for probing spinal cord (SC) pathologies, especially in mouse models of human diseases. However, diffusion tensor imaging series requires a long acquisition time and mouse experiments rarely use rapid imaging techniques such as echo planar imaging. A recent preliminary study demonstrated the feasibility and robustness of the echo planar imaging sequence for mouse cervical SC diffusion tensor imaging investigations. The feasibility of echo planar imaging at thoracic and lumbar levels, however, remained unknown due to bulk motion, field inhomogeneities, and off-centering of the SC in the axial plane. In the present study, the feasibility and the robustness of an echo planar imaging-based diffusion tensor imaging sequence for mouse thoracic and lumbar SC investigations is demonstrated. Quantitative and accurate diffusion tensor imaging metrics, as well as high spatially resolved images, have been obtained. This successful demonstration may open new perspectives in the field of mouse SC imaging. Echo planar imaging is used in several imaging modalities, such as relaxometry or perfusion, and may prove to be very attractive for multimodal MR investigations to acquire a more detailed characterization of the SC tissue.
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Effects of stimulation frequency and pulse duration on fatigue and metabolic cost during a single bout of neuromuscular electrical stimulation.
Muscle Nerve
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
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We have investigated the effects of stimulation frequency and pulse duration on fatigue and energy metabolism in rat gastrocnemius muscle during a single bout of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Electrical pulses were delivered at 100 Hz (1-ms pulse duration) and 20 Hz (5-ms pulse duration) for the high (HF) and low (LF) frequency protocols, respectively. As a standardization procedure, the averaged stimulation intensity, the averaged total charge, the initial peak torque, the duty cycle, the contraction duration and the torque-time integral were similar in both protocols. Fatigue was assessed using two testing trains delivered at a frequency of 100 Hz and 20 Hz before and after each protocol. Metabolic changes were investigated in vivo using 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and in vitro in freeze-clamped muscles. Both LF and HF NMES protocols induced the same decrease in testing trains and metabolic changes. We conclude that, under carefully controlled and comparable conditions, the use of low stimulation frequency and long pulse duration do not minimize the occurrence of muscle fatigue or affect the corresponding stimulation-induced metabolic changes so that this combination of stimulation parameters would not be adequate in the context of rehabilitation.
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Unfolding the long-term pathophysiological processes following an acute inflammatory demyelinating lesion of multiple sclerosis.
Magn Reson Imaging
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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Acute symptomatic inflammation is a main feature of multiple sclerosis but pathophysiological processes underlying total or partial recovery are poorly understood.
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Beneficial effects of citrulline malate on skeletal muscle function in endotoxemic rat.
Eur. J. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2009
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Although citrulline malate (CM; CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol) is used against fatigue states, its anti-asthenic effect remains poorly documented. The objective of this double-blind study was to evaluate the effect of oral ingestion of CM on a rat model of asthenia, using in situ (31)Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Muscle weakness was induced by intraperitoneal injections of Klebsiella pneumoniae endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides at 3 mg/kg) at t(0) and t(0)+24 h. For each animal, muscle function was investigated strictly non-invasively before (t(0)-24 h) and during (t(0)+48 h) endotoxemia, through a standardized rest-stimulation-recovery protocol. The transcutaneous electrical stimulation protocol consisted of 5.7 min of repeated isometric contractions at a frequency of 3.3 Hz, and force production was measured with an ergometer. CM supplementation in endotoxemic animals prevented the basal phosphocreatine/ATP ratio reduction and normalized the intracellular pH (pH(i)) time-course during muscular activity as a sign of an effect at the muscle energetics level. In addition, CM treatment avoided the endotoxemia-induced decline in developed force. These results demonstrate the efficiency of CM for limiting skeletal muscle dysfunction in rats treated with bacterial endotoxin.
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Reproducibility assessment of metabolic variables characterizing muscle energetics in vivo: A 31P-MRS study.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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The purpose of the present study was to assess the reliability of metabolic parameters measured using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P MRS) during two standardized rest-exercise-recovery protocols. Twelve healthy subjects performed the standardized protocols at two different intensities; i.e., a moderate intensity (MOD) repeated over a two-month period and heavy intensity (HEAVY) repeated over a years time. Test-retest reliability was analyzed using coefficient of variation (CV), limits of agreement (LOA), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). During exercise and recovery periods, most of the metabolic parameters exhibited a good reliability. The CVs of individual concentration of phosphocreatine ([PCr]), concentration of adenosine diphosphate ([ADP]), and pH values recorded at end of the HEAVY exercise were lower than 15%. The CV calculated for the rate of PCr resynthesis and the maximal oxidative capacity were less than 13% during the HEAVY protocol. Inferred parameters such as oxidative and total adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production rates exhibited a good reliability (ICC approximately 0.7; CV < 15% during the HEAVY protocol). Our results demonstrated that measurement error using (31)P-MRS during a standardized exercise was low and that biological variability accounted for the vast majority of the measurement variability. In addition, the corresponding metabolic measurements can reliably be used for longitudinal studies performed even over a long period of time.
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Mouse lumbar and cervical spinal cord blood flow measurements by arterial spin labeling: sensitivity optimization and first application.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2009
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In spinal cord injuries (SCI), tissue edema and consequent ischemia play an important role in neuronal damage. The assessment of quantitative spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) would be very valuable to help in understanding SCI pathophysiology. SCBF has previously been measured in animals with invasive techniques such as hydrogen clearance or labeled microspheres. A recent preliminary study also demonstrated the feasibility of assessing cervical SCBF by MRI with arterial spin labeling (ASL). However, due to bulk motion and field inhomogeneities, the feasibility of perfusion MRI at lower levels of the SC (thoracic, lumbar) remained an open question. In the present study, absolute SCBF measurements were carried out at both the cervical C3 and lumbar L1 levels of mouse SC using an adapted presaturated flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (presat-FAIR) ASL technique at 11.75T. Quantitative SCBF maps (resolution of 133 x 133 microm(2)) showed significantly lower gray matter (GM) perfusion values at the L1 level as compared to the C3 level (6% and 11% for the ventral and dorsal horns and 8% for total GM). The presat-FAIR technique was then successfully applied to a mouse model of hemisection performed at the L1 level, illustrating the potential of ASL to help in SC pathology characterization.
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Grid-free interactive and automated data processing for MR chemical shift imaging data.
MAGMA
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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Todays available chemical shift imaging (CSI) analysis tools are based on Fourier transform of the entire data set prior to interactive display. This strategy is associated with limitations particularly when arbitrary voxel positions within a 3D spatial volume are needed by the user. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a processing-resource-efficient alternative strategy for both interactive and automated CSI data processing up to three spatial dimensions.
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Experience of diffusion tensor imaging and 1H spectroscopy for outcome prediction in severe traumatic brain injury: Preliminary results.
Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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The objective of the study is to test whether multimodal magnetic resonance imaging can provide a reliable outcome prediction of the clinical status, focusing on consciousness at 1 year after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).
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Does oxidative capacity affect energy cost? An in vivo MR investigation of skeletal muscle energetics.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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Investigations of training effects on exercise energy cost have yielded conflicting results. The purpose of the present study was to compare quadriceps energy cost and oxidative capacity between endurance-trained and sedentary subjects during a heavy dynamic knee extension exercise. We quantified the rates of ATP turnover from oxidative and anaerobic pathways with (31)P-MRS, and we measured simultaneously pulmonary oxygen uptake in order to assess both total ATP production [i.e., energy cost (EC)] and O(2) consumption (O(2) cost) scaled to power output. Seven sedentary (SED) and seven endurance-trained (TRA) subjects performed a dynamic standardized rest-exercise-recovery protocol at an exercise intensity corresponding to 35% of maximal voluntary contraction. We showed that during a dynamic heavy exercise, the O(2) cost and EC were similar in the SED and endurance-trained groups. For a given EC, endurance-trained subjects exhibited a higher relative mitochondrial contribution to ATP production at the muscle level (84 +/- 12% in TRA and 57 +/- 12% in SED; P < 0.01) whereas the anaerobic contribution was reduced (18 +/- 12% in TRA and 44 +/- 11% in SED; P < 0.01). Our results obtained in vivo illustrate that on the one hand the beneficial effects of endurance training are not related to any reduction in EC or O(2) cost and on the other hand that this similar EC was linked to a change regarding the contribution of anaerobic and oxidative processes to energy production, i.e., a greater aerobic energy contribution associated with a concomitant reduction of the anaerobic energy supply.
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Effects of a prior high-intensity knee-extension exercise on muscle recruitment and energy cost: a combined local and global investigation in humans.
Exp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2009
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The effects of a priming exercise bout on both muscle energy production and the pattern of muscle fibre recruitment during a subsequent exercise bout are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a prior exercise bout which is known to increase O(2) supply and to induce a residual acidosis could alter energy cost and muscle fibre recruitment during a subsequent heavy-intensity knee-extension exercise. Fifteen healthy subjects performed two 6 min bouts of heavy exercise separated by a 6 min resting period. Rates of oxidative and anaerobic ATP production, determined with (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and breath-by-breath measurements of pulmonary oxygen uptake were obtained simultaneously. Changes in muscle oxygenation and muscle fibre recruitment occurring within the quadriceps were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and surface electromyography. The priming heavy-intensity exercise increased motor unit recruitment (P < 0.05) in the early part of the subsequent exercise bout but did not alter muscle energy cost. We also observed a reduced deoxygenation time delay, whereas the deoxygenation amplitude was increased (P < 0.01). These changes were associated with an increased oxidative ATP cost after approximately 50 s (P < 0.05) and a slight reduction in the overall anaerobic rate of ATP production (0.11 +/- 0.04 mM min(-1) W(-1) for bout 1 and 0.06 +/- 0.11 mM min(-1) W(-1) for bout 2; P < 0.05). We showed that a priming bout of heavy exercise led to an increased recruitment of motor units in the early part of the second bout of heavy exercise. Considering the increased oxidative cost and the unaltered energy cost, one could suggest that our results illustrate a reduced metabolic strain per fibre.
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Deletion of TRAAK potassium channel affects brain metabolism and protects against ischemia.
PLoS ONE
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Cerebral stroke is a worldwide leading cause of disability. The two-pore domain K? channels identified as background channels are involved in many functions in brain under physiological and pathological conditions. We addressed the hypothesis that TRAAK, a mechano-gated and lipid-sensitive two-pore domain K? channel, is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia. We studied the effects of TRAAK deletion on brain morphology and metabolism under physiological conditions, and during temporary focal cerebral ischemia in Traak?/? mice using a combination of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We provide the first in vivo evidence establishing a link between TRAAK and neurometabolism. Under physiological conditions, Traak?/? mice showed a particular metabolic phenotype characterized by higher levels of taurine and myo-inositol than Traak?/? mice. Upon ischemia, Traak?/? mice had a smaller infarcted volume, with lower contribution of cellular edema than Traak?/? mice. Moreover, brain microcirculation was less damaged, and brain metabolism and pH were preserved. Our results show that expression of TRAAK strongly influences tissue levels of organic osmolytes. Traak?/? mice resilience to cellular edema under ischemia appears related to their physiologically high levels of myo-inositol and of taurine, an aminoacid involved in the modulation of mitochondrial activity and cell death. The beneficial effects of TRAAK deletion designate this channel as a promising pharmacological target for the treatment against stroke.
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The slow components of phosphocreatine and pulmonary oxygen uptake can be dissociated during heavy exercise according to training status.
Exp. Physiol.
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To better understand the mechanisms underlying the pulmonary O(2) uptake (V(O(2P))) slow component during high-intensity exercise, we used (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas exchange, surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy measurements to examine the potential relationship between the slow components of V(O(2P)) and phosphocreatine (PCr), muscle recruitment and tissue oxygenation in endurance-trained athletes and sedentary subjects. Specifically, six endurance-trained and seven sedentary subjects performed a dynamic high-intensity exercise protocol during 6 min at an exercise intensity corresponding to 35-40% of knee-extensor maximal voluntary contraction. The slow component of V(O(2P))(117 ± 60 ml min(-1), i.e. 20 ± 10% of the total response) was associated with a paradoxical PCr resynthesis in endurance-trained athletes (-0.90 ± 1.27 mm, i.e. -12 ± 16% of the total response). Meanwhile, oxygenated haemoglobin increased throughout the second part of exercise and was significantly higher at the end of exercise compared with the value at 120 s (P < 0.05), whereas the integrated EMG was not significantly changed throughout exercise. In sedentary subjects, a slow component was simultaneously observed for V(O(2P)) and [PCr] time-dependent changes (208 ± 14 ml min(-1), i.e. 38 ± 18% of the total V(O(2P))response, and 1.82 ± 1.39 mm, i.e. 16 ± 13% of the total [PCr] response), but the corresponding absolute or relative amplitudes were not correlated. The integrated EMG was significantly increased throughout exercise in sedentary subjects. Taken together, our results challenge the hypothesis of a mechanistic link between [PCr] and V(O(2P)) slow components and demonstrate that, as a result of a tighter metabolic control and increased O(2) availability, the [PCr] slow component can be minimized in endurance-trained athletes while the V(O(2P)) slow component occurs.
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In vivo evidence of an age-related increase in ATP cost of contraction in the plantar flexor muscles.
Clin. Sci.
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Impaired skeletal muscle efficiency potentially contributes to the age-related decline in exercise capacity and may explain the altered hemodynamic response to exercise in the elderly. Thus, we examined whether 1) the ATP cost of contraction increases with age, and 2) this results in altered convective O2 delivery to maintain microvascular oxygenation in the calf muscle. To this aim, we used an integrative experimental approach combining phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS), Doppler ultrasound imaging, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during dynamic plantar flexion exercise at 40% of maximal power output (WRmax) in 20 healthy young and 20 older subjects matched for physical activity. The ATP cost of contraction was significantly higher in the old (7.2 ± 4.1 mM.min-1.W-1) compared with the young (2.4 ± 1.9 mM.min-1.W-1, P<0.05) and this was only significantly correlated with plantar flexion WRmax in the old (r=-0.52, P<0.05). Even when differences in power output were taken into account, end-exercise blood flow (old: 259 ± 168; young: 134 ± 40 ml.min-1.W-1, P<0.05) and convective O2 delivery (old: 0.048 ± 0.031; young: 0.026 ± 0.008 L.min-1.W-1, P<0.05) were greater in the old in comparison to the young. In contrast, NIRS oxy-, deoxy-hemoglobin and microvascular oxygenation indices were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Therefore, this study reveals that, while the peripheral hemodynamic responses to plantar flexion exercise appear to be appropriate, the elevated energy cost of contraction and associated reduction in WRmax in this muscle group may play a role in limiting exercise capacity with age.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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