JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cognitive impairment and resting-state network connectivity in Parkinson's disease.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of this work was to evaluate changes in the connectivity patterns of a set of cognitively relevant, dynamically interrelated brain networks in association with cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) using resting-state functional MRI. Sixty-five nondemented PD patients and 36 matched healthy controls were included. Thirty-four percent of PD patients were classified as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI) based on performance in attention/executive, visuospatial/visuoperceptual (VS/VP) and memory functions. A data-driven approach using independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify the default-mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the bilateral frontoparietal networks (FPN), which were compared between groups using a dual-regression approach controlling for gray matter atrophy. Additional seed-based analyses using a priori defined regions of interest were used to characterize local changes in intranetwork and internetwork connectivity. Structural group comparisons through voxel-based morphometry and cortical thickness were additionally performed to assess associated gray matter atrophy. ICA results revealed reduced connectivity between the DAN and right frontoinsular regions in MCI patients, associated with worse performance in attention/executive functions. The DMN displayed increased connectivity with medial and lateral occipito-parietal regions in MCI patients, associated with worse VS/VP performance, and with occipital reductions in cortical thickness. In line with data-driven results, seed-based analyses mainly revealed reduced within-DAN, within-DMN and DAN-FPN connectivity, as well as loss of normal DAN-DMN anticorrelation in MCI patients. Our findings demonstrate differential connectivity changes affecting the networks evaluated, which we hypothesize to be related to the pathophysiological bases of different types of cognitive impairment in PD. Hum Brain Mapp, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Related JoVE Video
Correlates of cerebrospinal fluid levels of oligomeric- and total-?-synuclein in premotor, motor and dementia stages of Parkinson's disease.
J. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
High-oligomeric and low-total-?-synuclein cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels have been found in Parkinson's disease (PD), but with inconsistent or limited data, particularly on their clinical and structural correlates in earliest (premotor) or latest (dementia) PD stages. We determined CSF oligomeric- and total-?-synuclein in 77 subjects: 23 with idiopathic REM-sleep behaviour disorder (iRBD, a condition likely to include a remarkable proportion of subjects in the premotor stage of PD) and 41 with PD [21 non-demented (PDND) + 20 demented (PDD)], intended to reflect the premotor-motor-dementia PD continuum, along with 13 healthy controls. The study protocol also included the Unified PD Rating Scale motor-section (UPDRS-III), mini mental state examination (MMSE), neuropsychological cognitive testing, 3T brain MRI for cortical-thickness analyses, CSF ? and CSF A?. CSF oligomeric-?-synuclein was higher in PDND than iRBD and in PDD than iRBD and controls, and correlated with UPDRS-III, MMSE, semantic fluency and visuo-perceptive scores across the proposed premotor-motor-dementia PD continuum (iRBD + PDND + PDD). CSF total-?-synuclein positively correlated with age, CSF A?, and, particularly, CSF ?, tending towards lower levels in PD (but not iRBD) vs. controls only when controlling for CSF ?. Low CSF total-?-synuclein was associated with dysfunction in phonetic-fluency (a frontal-lobe function) in PD and with frontal cortical thinning in iRBD and PDND independently of CSF ?. Conversely, the associations of high (instead of low) CSF total-?-synuclein with posterior-cortical neuropsychological deficits in PD and with posterior cortical thinning in PDD were driven by high CSF ?. These findings suggest that CSF oligomeric- and total-?-synuclein have different clinical, neuropsychological and MRI correlates across the proposed premotor-motor-dementia PD continuum. CSF total-?-synuclein correlations with CSF ? and A? support the hypothesis of an interaction among these proteins in PD, with CSF ? probably influencing the presence of high (instead of low) CSF total-?-synuclein and its correlates mostly in the setting of PD-related dementia.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic analysis implicates APOE, SNCA and suggests lysosomal dysfunction in the etiology of dementia with Lewy bodies.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Clinical and neuropathological similarities between dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases (PD and AD, respectively) suggest that these disorders may share etiology. To test this hypothesis, we have performed an association study of 54 genomic regions, previously implicated in PD or AD, in a large cohort of DLB cases and controls. The cohort comprised 788 DLB cases and 2624 controls. To minimize the issue of potential misdiagnosis, we have also performed the analysis including only neuropathologically proven DLB cases (667 cases). The results show that the APOE is a strong genetic risk factor for DLB, confirming previous findings, and that the SNCA and SCARB2 loci are also associated after a study-wise Bonferroni correction, although these have a different association profile than the associations reported for the same loci in PD. We have previously shown that the p.N370S variant in GBA is associated with DLB, which, together with the findings at the SCARB2 locus, suggests a role for lysosomal dysfunction in this disease. These results indicate that DLB has a unique genetic risk profile when compared with the two most common neurodegenerative diseases and that the lysosome may play an important role in the etiology of this disorder. We make all these data available.
Related JoVE Video
A novel non-rapid-eye movement and rapid-eye-movement parasomnia with sleep breathing disorder associated with antibodies to IgLON5: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and post-mortem study.
Lancet Neurol
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Autoimmunity might be associated with or implicated in sleep and neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to describe the features of a novel neurological syndrome associated with prominent sleep dysfunction and antibodies to a neuronal antigen.
Related JoVE Video
Cortical thinning associated with mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.
Mov. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate patterns of cortical atrophy associated with mild cognitive impairment in a large sample of nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and its relation with specific neuropsychological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 90 nondemented PD patients and 32 healthy controls. All underwent a neuropsychological battery including tests that assess different cognitive domains: attention and working memory, executive functions, memory, language, and visuoperceptual-visuospatial functions. Patients were classified according to their cognitive status as PD patients without mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n?=?43) and PD patients with MCI (n?=?47). Freesurfer software was used to obtain maps of cortical thickness for group comparisons and correlation with neuropsychological performance. Patients with MCI showed regional cortical thinning in parietotemporal regions, increased global atrophy (global cortical thinning, total gray matter volume reduction, and ventricular enlargement), as well as significant cognitive impairment in memory, executive, and visuospatial and visuoperceptual domains. Correlation analyses showed that all neuropsychological tests were associated with cortical thinning in parietotemporal regions and to a lesser extent in frontal regions. These results provide neuroanatomic support to the concept of MCI classified according to Movement Disorders Society criteria. The posterior pattern of atrophy in temporoparietal regions could be a structural neuroimaging marker of cognitive impairment in nondemented PD patients. All of the neuropsychological tests reflected regional brain atrophy, but no specific patterns were seen corresponding to impairment in distinct cognitive domains.
Related JoVE Video
Cystatin C is differentially involved in multiple system atrophy phenotypes.
Neuropathol. Appl. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Since cystatin C (CysC) in involved in some forms of neurodegeneration, we investigated the possible relationship between CysC and multiple system atrophy (MSA), including its parkinsonian (MSAp) and cerebellar (MSAc) phenotypes.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of blood serum micro-RNAs associated with idiopathic and LRRK2 Parkinson's disease.
J. Neurosci. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Blood-cell-free circulating micro-RNAs (miRNAs) have been proposed as potential accessible biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we analyzed the serum levels of 377 miRNAs in a discovery set of 10 idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients, 10 PD patients carriers of the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (LRRK2 PD), and 10 controls by using real-time quantitative PCR-based TaqMan MicroRNA arrays. We detected candidate differentially expressed miRNAs, which were further tested in a first validation set consisting of 20 IPD, 20 LRRK2 PD, and 20 control samples. We found four statistically significant miRNAs that were downregulated in either LRRK2 or IPD (miR-29a, miR-29c, miR-19a, and miR-19b). Subsequently, we validated these findings in a third set of samples consisting of 65 IPD and 65 controls and confirmed the association of downregulated levels of miR-29c, miR-29a, and miR-19b in IPD. Differentially expressed miRNAs are predicted to target genes belonging to pathways related to ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, MAPK, Wnt, mTOR, adipocytokine, and neuron projection. Results from our exploratory study indicate that downregulated levels of specific circulating serum miRNAs are associated with PD and suggest their potential use as noninvasive biomarkers for PD. Future studies should further confirm the association of these miRNAs with PD.
Related JoVE Video
Functional brain networks and cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Graph-theoretical analyses of functional networks obtained with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have recently proven to be a useful approach for the study of the substrates underlying cognitive deficits in different diseases. We used this technique to investigate whether cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with changes in global and local network measures. Thirty-six healthy controls (HC) and 66 PD patients matched for age, sex, and education were classified as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or not based on performance in the three mainly affected cognitive domains in PD: attention/executive, visuospatial/visuoperceptual (VS/VP), and declarative memory. Resting-state fMRI and graph theory analyses were used to evaluate network measures. We have found that patients with MCI had connectivity reductions predominantly affecting long-range connections as well as increased local interconnectedness manifested as higher measures of clustering, small-worldness, and modularity. The latter measures also tended to correlate negatively with cognitive performance in VS/VP and memory functions. Hub structure was also reorganized: normal hubs displayed reduced centrality and degree in MCI PD patients. Our study indicates that the topological properties of brain networks are changed in PD patients with cognitive deficits. Our findings provide novel data regarding the functional substrate of cognitive impairment in PD, which may prove to have value as a prognostic marker.
Related JoVE Video
Multiple organ involvement by alpha-synuclein pathology in Lewy body disorders.
Mov. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Lewy body (LB) diseases are characterized by alpha-synuclein (AS) aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS). Involvement of the peripheral autonomic nervous system (pANS) is increasingly recognized, although less studied. The aim of this study was to systematically analyze the distribution and severity of AS pathology in the CNS and pANS. Detailed postmortem histopathological study of brain and peripheral tissues from 28 brain bank donors (10 with Parkinson's disease [PD], 5 with dementia with LB [DLB], and 13 with non-LB diseases including atypical parkinsonism and non-LB dementia). AS aggregates were found in the pANS of all 15 LB disease cases (PD, DLB) in stellate and sympathetic ganglia (100%), vagus nerve (86.7%), gastrointestinal tract (86.7%), adrenal gland and/or surrounding fat (53.3%), heart (100%), and genitourinary tract (13.3%), as well as in 1 case of incidental Lewy body disease (iLBD). A craniocaudal gradient of AS burden in sympathetic chain and gastrointestinal tract was observed. DLB cases showed higher amounts of CNS AS aggregates than PD cases, but this was not the case in the pANS. No pANS AS aggregates were detected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases with or without CNS AS aggregates. All pathologically confirmed LB disease cases including 1 case of iLBD had AS aggregates in the pANS with a craniocaudal gradient of pathology burden in sympathetic chain and gastrointestinal tract. AS was not detected in the pANS of any AD case. These findings may help in the search of peripheral AS aggregates in vivo for the early diagnosis of PD.
Related JoVE Video
The Significance of ?-Synuclein, Amyloid-? and Tau Pathologies in Parkinsons Disease Progression and Related Dementia.
Neurodegener Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Background: Dementia is one of the milestones of advanced Parkinsons disease (PD), with its neuropathological substrate still being a matter of debate, particularly regarding its potential mechanistic implications. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the relative importance of Lewy-related ?-synuclein and Alzheimers tau and amyloid-? (A?) pathologies in disease progression and dementia in PD. Methods: We reviewed studies conducted at the Queen Square Brain Bank, Institute of Neurology, University College London, using large PD cohorts. Results: Cortical Lewy- and Alzheimer-type pathologies are associated with milestones of poorer prognosis and with non-tremor predominance, which have been, in turn, linked to dementia. The combination of these pathologies is the most robust neuropathological substrate of PD-related dementia, with cortical A? burden determining a faster progression to dementia. Conclusion: The shared relevance of these pathologies in PD progression and dementia is in line with experimental data suggesting synergism between ?-synuclein, tau and A? and with studies testing these proteins as disease biomarkers, hence favouring the eventual testing of therapeutic strategies targeting these proteins in PD. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Related JoVE Video
Combined dementia-risk biomarkers in Parkinsons disease: a prospective longitudinal study.
Parkinsonism Relat. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Neuropsychological (mostly posterior-cortical) deficits, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atrophy patterns, and low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-? have been separately related to worsening cognition in Parkinsons disease (PD). However, these biomarkers have not been longitudinally assessed in combination as PD-dementia predictors. In this prospective longitudinal study, 27 non-demented PD patients underwent CSF, neuropsychological and 3-T brain-MRI studies at baseline and were re-assessed 18 months later in terms of progression to dementia (primary outcome) and longitudinal neuropsychological and cortical thickness changes (secondary outcomes). At follow-up 11 patients (41%) had progressed to dementia. Lower CSF amyloid-?, worse verbal learning, semantic fluency and visuoperceptual scores, and thinner superior-frontal/anterior cingulate and precentral regions were significant baseline dementia predictors in binary logistic regressions as quantitative and/or dichotomised traits. All participants without baseline biomarker abnormalities remained non-demented whereas all with abnormalities in each biomarker type progressed to dementia, with intermediate risk for those showing abnormalities in a single to two biomarker types (p = 0.006). Both the dementia-outcome and low baseline CSF amyloid-? were prospectively associated with limbic and posterior-cortical neuropsychological decline and frontal, limbic and posterior-cortical thinning from baseline to follow-up. These findings suggest that the combination of CSF amyloid-?, neuropsychological and cortical thickness biomarkers might provide a basis for dementia-risk stratification and progression monitoring in PD.
Related JoVE Video
Cortical thinning is associated with disease stages and dementia in Parkinsons disease.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To investigate the pattern of cortical thinning in Parkinsons disease (PD) across different disease stages and to elucidate to what extent cortical thinning is related to cognitive impairment.
Related JoVE Video
Lewy- and Alzheimer-type pathologies in Parkinsons disease dementia: which is more important?
Brain
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The relative importance of Lewy- and Alzheimer-type pathologies to dementia in Parkinsons disease remains unclear. We have examined the combined associations of ?-synuclein, tau and amyloid-? accumulation in 56 pathologically confirmed Parkinsons disease cases, 29 of whom had developed dementia. Cortical and subcortical amyloid-? scores were obtained, while tau and ?-synuclein pathologies were rated according to the respective Braak stages. Additionally, cortical Lewy body and Lewy neurite scores were determined and Lewy body densities were generated using morphometry. Non-parametric statistics, together with regression models, receiver-operating characteristic curves and survival analyses were applied. Cortical and striatal amyloid-? scores, Braak tau stages, cortical Lewy body, Lewy neurite scores and Lewy body densities, but not Braak ?-synuclein stages, were all significantly greater in the Parkinsons disease-dementia group (P<0.05), with all the pathologies showing a significant positive correlation to each other (P<0.05). A combination of pathologies [area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve=0.95 (0.88-1.00); P<0.0001] was a better predictor of dementia than the severity of any single pathology. Additionally, cortical amyloid-? scores (r=-0.62; P=0.043) and Braak tau stages (r=-0.52; P=0.028), but not Lewy body scores (r=-0.25; P=0.41) or Braak ?-synuclein stages (r=-0.44; P=0.13), significantly correlated with mini-mental state examination scores in the subset of cases with this information available within the last year of life (n=15). High cortical amyloid-? score (P=0.017) along with an older age at onset (P=0.001) were associated with a shorter time-to-dementia period. A combination of Lewy- and Alzheimer-type pathologies is a robust pathological correlate of dementia in Parkinsons disease, with quantitative and semi-quantitative assessment of Lewy pathology being more informative than Braak ?-synuclein stages. Cortical amyloid-? and age at disease onset seem to determine the rate to dementia.
Related JoVE Video
Amyloid-? and ? biomarkers in Parkinsons disease-dementia.
J. Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Dementia is a frequent and devastating non-motor complication of advanced Parkinsons disease (PD). There is growing evidence of a synergistic role of Alzheimers-type brain lesions containing ? and amyloid-? (A?) proteins and cortical Lewy aggregates in PD-related dementia (PDD). Therefore, biomarkers of both ? and A? may be seen as diagnostic and predictive markers of PDD. Here, we review the available studies in PD and PDD using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total ?, phospho-?, and/or A? levels, and PET probes targeting Alzheimers-type lesions. Overall, high CSF ? and phospho-? levels and/or low CSF A? levels have been found in part of PDD patients, and a longitudinal study has found greater worsening in cognitive performance over time in non-demented PD patients with low baseline CSF A? levels. Few studies are available on the use of PET imaging in PD, all of them using the Pittsburgh B compound (PIB), and with figures of about 30% of scans with PIB uptake in the AD-range in PDD. We conclude that these CSF and PET markers deserve further evaluation as candidate biomarkers of dementia in PD. According to this, we are currently undertaking a longitudinal project on the predictive value of dementia of the combined use of CSF ? and A? and (18)F-FDDNP PET in PD.
Related JoVE Video
Assessment of cortical degeneration in patients with Parkinsons disease by voxel-based morphometry, cortical folding, and cortical thickness.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Noninvasive brain imaging methods provide useful information on cerebral involution and degenerative processes. Here we assessed cortical degeneration in 20 nondemented patients with Parkinsons disease (PD) and 20 healthy controls using three quantitative neuroanatomical approaches: voxel-based morphometry (VBM), cortical folding (BrainVisa), and cortical thickness (FreeSurfer). We examined the relationship between global and regional gray matter (GM) volumes, sulcal indices, and thickness measures derived from the previous methods as well as their association with cognitive performance, age, severity of motor symptoms, and disease stage. VBM analyses showed GM volume reductions in the left temporal gyrus in patients compared with controls. Cortical folding measures revealed significant decreases in the left frontal and right collateral sulci in patients. Finally, analysis of cortical thickness showed widespread cortical thinning in right lateral occipital, parietal and left temporal, frontal, and premotor regions. We found that, in patients, all global anatomical measures correlated with age, while GM volume and cortical thickness significantly correlated with disease stage. In controls, a significant association was found between global GM volume and cortical folding with age. Overall these results suggest that the three different methods provide complementary and related information on neurodegenerative changes occurring in PD, however, surface-based measures of cortical folding and especially cortical thickness seem to be more sensitive than VBM to identify regional GM changes associated to PD.
Related JoVE Video
Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders.
Appl Clin Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntingtons chorea, for instance). Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia). In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms) in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinsons disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets.
Related JoVE Video
High cerebrospinal tau levels are associated with the rs242557 tau gene variant and low cerebrospinal ?-amyloid in Parkinson disease.
Neurosci. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau and phospho-tau levels have been associated with certain tau gene variants and low CSF amyloid-? (A?) levels in Alzheimer disease (AD), constituting potential biomarkers of molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We aimed to assess whether such CSF-genetic endophenotypes are also present in Parkinson disease (PD). CSF tau, phospho-tau and A? levels were obtained from 38 PD patients (19 with dementia) using specific ELISA techniques. All cases were genotyped for a series of tau gene polymorphisms (rs1880753, rs1880756, rs1800547, rs1467967, rs242557, rs2471738 and rs7521). The A-allele rs242557 polymorphism was the only tau gene variant significantly associated with higher CSF tau and phospho-tau levels, under both dominant and dose-response model. This association depended on the presence of dementia, and was only observed in individuals with low (<500pg/mL) CSF A? levels. Such genetic-CSF endophenotypes are probably a reflection of the presence of AD-like molecular changes in part of PD patients in the setting of dementia.
Related JoVE Video
Cerebrospinal hypocretin, daytime sleepiness and sleep architecture in Parkinsons disease dementia.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Excessive daytime sleepiness is common in Parkinsons disease and has been associated with Parkinsons disease-related dementia. Narcoleptic features have been observed in Parkinsons disease patients with excessive daytime sleepiness and hypocretin cell loss has been found in the hypothalamus of Parkinsons disease patients, in association with advanced disease. However, studies on cerebrospinal fluid levels of hypocretin-1 (orexin A) in Parkinsons disease have been inconclusive. Reports of sleep studies in Parkinsons disease patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness have also been disparate, pointing towards a variety of causes underlying excessive daytime sleepiness. In this study, we aimed to measure cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels in Parkinsons disease patients with and without dementia and to study their relationship to dementia and clinical excessive daytime sleepiness, as well as to describe potentially related sleep architecture changes. Twenty-one Parkinsons disease patients without dementia and 20 Parkinsons disease patients with dementia, along with 22 control subjects without sleep complaints, were included. Both Epworth sleepiness scale, obtained with the help of the caregivers, and mini-mental state examination were recorded. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels were measured in all individuals using a radio-immunoassay technique. Additionally, eight Parkinsons disease patients without dementia and seven Parkinsons disease patients with dementia underwent video-polysomnogram and multiple sleep latencies test. Epworth sleepiness scale scores were higher in Parkinsons disease patients without dementia and Parkinsons disease patients with dementia than controls (P < 0.01) and scores >10 were more frequent in Parkinsons disease patients with dementia than in Parkinsons disease patients without dementia (P = 0.04). Cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels were similar among groups (controls = 321.15 +/- 47.15 pg/ml; without dementia = 300.99 +/- 58.68 pg/ml; with dementia = 309.94 +/- 65.95 pg/ml; P = 0.67), and unrelated to either epworth sleepiness scale or mini-mental state examination. Dominant occipital frequency awake was slower in Parkinsons disease patients with dementia than Parkinsons disease patients without dementia (P = 0.05). Presence of slow dominant occipital frequency and/or loss of normal non-rapid eye movement sleep architecture was more frequent among Parkinsons disease patients with dementia (P = 0.029). Thus, excessive daytime sleepiness is more frequent in Parkinsons disease patients with dementia than Parkinsons disease patients without dementia, but lumbar cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and unrelated to severity of sleepiness or the cognitive status. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid does not accurately reflect the hypocretin cell loss known to occur in the hypothalamus of advanced Parkinsons disease. Alternatively, mechanisms other than hypocretin cells dysfunction may be responsible for excessive daytime sleepiness and the sleep architecture alterations seen in these patients.
Related JoVE Video
Cerebrospinal tau, phospho-tau, and beta-amyloid and neuropsychological functions in Parkinsons disease.
Mov. Disord.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Alzheimers disease (AD)-pathology may play a role in Parkinsons disease (PD)-related dementia (PDD). The aim of this study was to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau, phospho-tau, and beta-amyloid, proposed AD biomarkers, and their relationship with cognitive function in PD. Forty PD patients [20 nondemented (PDND); 20 PDD] and 30 controls underwent CSF tau, phospho-tau, and beta-amyloid analysis using specific ELISA techniques. All PD patients and 15 controls underwent neuropsychological testing of fronto-subcortical (attention, fluency) and neocortical (memory, naming, visuoperceptive) functions. CSF markers levels were compared between groups, and compared and correlated with neuropsychological measures in PDND and PDD separately and as a continuum (PD). CSF tau and phospho-tau were higher in PDD than in PDND and controls (P < 0.05). CSF beta-amyloid ranged from high (controls) to intermediate (PDND) and low (PDD) levels (P < 0.001). In all PD and PDD patients, high CSF tau and phospho-tau were associated with impaired memory and naming. In PDND, CSF beta-amyloid was related with phonetic fluency. These findings suggest underlying AD-pathology in PDD in association with cortical cognitive dysfunction, and that low CSF beta-amyloid in PDND patients with impaired phonetic fluency can constitute an early marker of cognitive dysfunction.
Related JoVE Video
Diagnosis and the premotor phase of Parkinson disease.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Clinical, neuroimaging, and pathologic studies have provided data suggesting that a variety of nonmotor symptoms can precede the classic motor features of Parkinson disease (PD) by years and, perhaps, even decades. The period when these symptoms arise can be referred to as the "premotor phase" of the disease. Here, we review the evidence supporting the occurrence of olfactory dysfunction, dysautonomia, and mood and sleep disorders, in this premotor phase of PD. These symptoms are well known in established PD and when presenting early, in the premotor phase, should be potentially considered as an integral part of the disease process. Even though information on the premotor phase of PD is rapidly accumulating, the diagnosis of premotor PD remains elusive at this time. Should a safe and effective treatment with disease-modifying or neuroprotective potential in PD become available, identifying individuals in the premotor phase will become a serious priority.
Related JoVE Video
Development and assessment of sensitive immuno-PCR assays for the quantification of cerebrospinal fluid three- and four-repeat tau isoforms in tauopathies.
J. Neurochem.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Characteristic tau isoform composition of the insoluble fibrillar tau inclusions define tauopathies, including Alzheimers disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17/frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau (FTDP-17/FTLD-tau). Exon 10 splicing mutations in the tau gene, MAPT, in familial FTDP-17 cause elevation of tau isoforms with four microtubule-binding repeat domains (4R-tau) compared to those with three repeats (3R-tau). On the basis of two well-characterised monoclonal antibodies against 3R- and 4R-tau, we developed novel, sensitive immuno-PCR assays for measuring the trace amounts of these isoforms in CSF. This was with the aim of assessing if CSF tau isoform changes reflect the pathological changes in tau isoform homeostasis in the degenerative brain and if these would be relevant for differential clinical diagnosis. Initial analysis of clinical CSF samples of PSP (n = 46), corticobasal syndrome (CBS; n = 22), AD (n = 11), Parkinsons disease with dementia (PDD; n = 16) and 35 controls revealed selective decreases of immunoreactive 4R-tau in CSF of PSP and AD patients compared with controls, and lower 4R-tau levels in AD compared with PDD. These decreases could be related to the disease-specific conformational masking of the RD4-binding epitope because of abnormal folding and/or aggregation of the 4R-tau isoforms in tauopathies or increased sequestration of the 4R-tau isoforms in brain tau pathology.
Related JoVE Video
Age at onset in LRRK2-associated PD is modified by SNCA variants.
J. Mol. Neurosci.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) and ?-synuclein (SNCA) genes are known genetic causes of Parkinsons disease (PD). Recently, a genetic variant in SNCA has been associated with a lower age at onset in idiopathic PD (IPD). We genotyped the SNCA polymorphism rs356219 in 84 LRRK2-associated PD patients carrying the G2019S mutation. We found that a SNCA genetic variant is associated with an earlier age at onset in LRRK2-associated PD. Our results support the notion that SNCA variants can modify the pathogenic effect of LRRK2 mutations as described previously for IPD.
Related JoVE Video
Grey matter volume correlates of cerebrospinal markers of Alzheimer-pathology in Parkinsons disease and related dementia.
Parkinsonism Relat. Disord.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Regional brain grey matter volume (GMV) reductions and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ? and A?, extensively studied as biomarkers of Alzheimers disease (AD), have also been reported in Parkinsons disease (PD) and related dementia (PDD). However, the relationship between these CSF and MRI biomarkers in PD and PDD remains unexplored. We studied these associations in 33 PD patients (18 with no dementia [PDND]; 15 fulfilling PDD criteria) and 12 neurologically unimpaired controls, with neuropsychological assessment, CSF ELISA studies, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis of high-field brain MRI. Neuropsychological assessment showed a gradation in cognitive performance from controls to PDND (significantly worse on visuospatial performance) and then to PDD (more impaired on memory, naming, fluency and visuospatial functions). No CSF-VBM correlations were found in controls or PDND patients. In contrast, in the analysis of both the PDD subgroup and the entire PD (PDND + PDD) sample, we found significant negative CSF-GMV correlations for ? and phospho-? and significant positive CSF-GMV correlations for A? in mostly frontal and temporal structures. The correlations in the entire PD sample fitted with a linear model and were thus unlikely to have been driven solely by the PDD subgroup. Additionally, an association between both the CSF markers and the CSF-associated GMV reductions with several neuropsychological functions was found. We interpret that CSF markers of AD pathology are associated with VBM-measures of brain atrophy in PD-related dementia and within the PD cognitive continuum, and deserve further attention as putative biomarkers of cognitive impairment and dementia in PD.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.