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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
DSSylation, a novel protein modification targets proteins induced by oxidative stress, and facilitates their degradation in cells.
Protein Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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Timely removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is critical for cells exposed to oxidative stresses; however, cellular mechanism for clearing oxidized proteins is not clear. Our study reveals a novel type of protein modification that may play a role in targeting oxidized proteins and remove them. In this process, DSS1 (deleted in split hand/split foot 1), an evolutionally conserved small protein, is conjugated to proteins induced by oxidative stresses in vitro and in vivo, implying oxidized proteins are DSS1 clients. A subsequent ubiquitination targeting DSS1-protein adducts has been observed, suggesting the client proteins are degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The DSS1 attachment to its clients is evidenced to be an enzymatic process modulated by an unidentified ATPase. We name this novel protein modification as DSSylation, in which DSS1 plays as a modifier, whose attachment may render target proteins a signature leading to their subsequent ubiquitination, thereby recruits proteasome to degrade them.
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Embedded high density metal nanoparticles with extraordinary thermal stability derived from guest-host mediated layered double hydroxides.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2010
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A chemical precursor mediated process was used to form catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) with an extremely high density (10(14) to 10(16) m(-2)), controllable size distribution (3-20 nm), and good thermal stability at high temperature (900 °C). This used metal cations deposited in layered double hydroxides (LDHs) to give metal catalyst NPs by reduction. The key was that the LDHs had their intercalated anions selected and exchanged by guest-host chemistry to prevent sintering of the metal NPs, and there was minimal sintering even at 900 °C. Metal NPs on MoO(4)(2-) intercalated Fe/Mg/Al LDH flakes were successfully used as the catalyst for the double helix growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays. The process provides a general method to fabricate thermally stable metal NPs catalysts with the desired size and density for catalysis and materials science.
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Obligatory role in GTP hydrolysis for the amide carbonyl oxygen of the Mg(2+)-coordinating Thr of regulatory GTPases.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2010
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When G-protein alpha subunits binds GTP and Mg(2+), they transition from their inactive to their active conformation. This transition is accompanied by completion of the coordination shell of Mg(2+) with electrons from six oxygens: two water molecules, the ss and gamma phosphoryls of GTP, a helix-alpha1 Ser, and a switch I domain (SWI) Thr, and the repositioning of SWI and SWII domains. SWII binds and regulates effector enzymes and facilitates GTP hydrolysis by repositioning the gamma-carbonyl of a Gln. Mutating the Ser generates regulatory GTPases that cannot lock Mg(2+) into its place and are locked in their inactive state with dominant negative properties. Curiously, mutating the Thr appears to reduce GTP hydrolysis. The reason for this difference is not known because it is also not known why removal of the Thr should affect the overall GTPase cycle differently than removal of the Ser. Working with recombinant Gsalpha, we report that mutating its SWI-Thr to either Ala, Glu, Gln, or Asp results not only in diminished GTPase activity but also in spontaneous activation of the SWII domain. Upon close examination of existing alpha subunit crystals, we noted the oxygen of the backbone carbonyl of SWI-Thr and of the gamma-carbonyl of SWII Gln to be roughly equidistant from the oxygen of the hydrolytic H(2)O. Our observations indicate that the Gln and Thr carbonyls play equihierarchical roles in the GTPase process and provide the mechanism that explains why mutating the Thr mimics mutating the Gln and not that of the Ser.
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Identification of the deleted in split hand/split foot 1 protein as a novel biomarker for human cervical cancer.
Carcinogenesis
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The morphological detection of early neoplastic transformation leading to cervical cancer remains problematic. In this work, we have identified deleted in split hand/split foot 1 protein (DSS1) as an early biomarker that is specifically upregulated in premalignant and malignant cervical epithelial cells, but is low or undetectable in non-malignant cells. DSS1 mRNA and protein levels are significantly increased in cultured human cervical carcinoma cell lines originating from primary and metastatic tumors. In fact, > 96% of patient tumor tissues were found to have cells with elevated DSS1 when compared with tumor-adjacent normal cells. In histological sections of cervical tissue containing either invasive cervical carcinoma or its precursor lesions, DSS1 was readily detected in the tumor cells. Steady-state DSS1 expression by immortalized cervical cancer cell lines was found to be necessary for maintenance of their transformed phenotype, since stable shRNA-mediated depletion of DSS1 in HeLa cells inhibited their proliferation and colony-forming activity in monolayer cultures and prevented division of these cells in soft agar. When DSS1 levels are reduced using shRNA, the cells ultimately undergo apoptosis via activation of p53 and the p53 downstream targets, and cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins including CPP32/caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and DNA-PKcs. In addition, silencing of DSS1 makes cervical cancer cells sensitive to cell death after treatment with cisplatin. We conclude that the DSS1 protein is critically involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype in cervical cancer cells, and that it might be a specific, robust and reliable marker for early detection, diagnosis and treatment.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.