JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cellular microRNAs and picornaviral infections.
RNA Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
microRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of short, endogenous, and non-coding RNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. The miRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism is involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses. Picornaviridae is a large family of RNA viruses, which includes a number of causative agents of many human and animal diseases viz., poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). Accumulated evidences have demonstrated that replication of picornaviruses can be regulated by miRNAs and picornaviral infections can alter the expression of cellular miRNAs. Herein, we outline the intricate interactions between miRNAs and picornaviral infections.
Related JoVE Video
MicroRNA roles in the NF- ?B signaling pathway during viral infections.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
NF- ? B signaling network is a crucial component of innate immunity. miRNAs are a subtype of small noncoding RNAs, involved in regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Increasing evidence has emerged that miRNAs play an important role in regulation of NF- ? B signaling pathway during viral infections. Both host and viral miRNAs are attributed to modulation of NF- ? B activity, thus affecting viral infection and clearance. Understandings of the mechanisms of these miRNAs will open a direction for development of novel antivirus drugs.
Related JoVE Video
Phylogenetic analysis of the endoribonuclease Dicer family.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Dicers are proteins of the ribonuclease III family with the ability to process dsRNA, involved in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Dicers are conserved from basal metazoans to higher metazoans and contain a number of functional domains that interact with dsRNA. The completed genome sequences of over 34 invertebrate species allowed us to systematically investigate Dicer genes over a diverse range of phyla. The majority of invertebrate Dicers clearly fell into the Dicer1 or Dicer2 subfamilies. Most nematodes possessed only one Dicer gene, a member of the Dicer1 subfamily, whereas two Dicer genes (Dicer1 and Dicer2) were present in all platyhelminths surveyed. Analysis of the key domains showed that a 5' pocket was conserved across members of the Dicer1 subfamily, with the exception of the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Interestingly, Nematostella vectensis DicerB grouped into Dicer2 subfamily harbored a 5' pocket, which is commonly present in Dicer1. Similarly, the 3' pocket was also found to be conserved in all Dicer proteins with the exceptions of Schmidtea mediterranea Dicer2 and Trichoplax adherens Dicer A. The loss of catalytic residues in the RNase III domain was noted in platyhelminths and cnidarians, and the 'ball' and 'socket' junction between two RNase III domains in platyhelminth Dicers was different from the canonical junction, suggesting the possibility of different conformations. The present data suggest that Dicers might have duplicated and diversified independently, and have evolved for various functions in invertebrates.
Related JoVE Video
Folate-chitosan-gemcitabine core-shell nanoparticles targeted to pancreatic cancer.
Chin. J. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Human pancreatic cancer is one of the most common clinical malignancies. The effect of comprehensive treatment based on surgery is general. The effects of chemotherapy were not obvious mainly because of lack of targeting and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to investigate the effects of folate receptor (FR)-mediated gemcitabine FA-Chi-Gem nanoparticles with a core-shell structure by electrostatic spray on pancreatic cancer.
Related JoVE Video
Early B-cell factors are required for specifying multiple retinal cell types and subtypes from postmitotic precursors.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The establishment of functional retinal circuits in the mammalian retina depends critically on the proper generation and assembly of six classes of neurons, five of which consist of two or more subtypes that differ in morphologies, physiological properties, and/or sublaminar positions. How these diverse neuronal types and subtypes arise during retinogenesis still remains largely to be defined at the molecular level. Here we show that all four family members of the early B-cell factor (Ebf) helix-loop-helix transcription factors are similarly expressed during mouse retinogenesis in several neuronal types and subtypes including ganglion, amacrine, bipolar, and horizontal cells, and that their expression in ganglion cells depends on the ganglion cell specification factor Brn3b. Misexpressed Ebfs bias retinal precursors toward the fates of non-AII glycinergic amacrine, type 2 OFF-cone bipolar and horizontal cells, whereas a dominant-negative Ebf suppresses the differentiation of these cells as well as ganglion cells. Reducing Ebf1 expression by RNA interference (RNAi) leads to an inhibitory effect similar to that of the dominant-negative Ebf, effectively neutralizes the promotive effect of wild-type Ebf1, but has no impact on the promotive effect of an RNAi-resistant Ebf1. These data indicate that Ebfs are both necessary and sufficient for specifying non-AII glycinergic amacrine, type 2 OFF-cone bipolar and horizontal cells, whereas they are only necessary but not sufficient for specifying ganglion cells; and further suggest that Ebfs may coordinate and cooperate with other retinogenic factors to ensure proper specification and differentiation of diverse retinal cell types and subtypes.
Related JoVE Video
Marker expression in circulating cancer cells of pancreatic cancer patients.
J. Surg. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
By the time patients are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, circulating cancer cells probably exist. Therefore, the detection of pancreatic cancer cells in the peripheral circulation could be used to diagnose early pancreatic cancer, which would otherwise not be detected by current imaging methods.
Related JoVE Video
Lentivirus-based DsRed-2-transfected pancreatic cancer cells for deep in vivo imaging of metastatic disease.
J. Surg. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. One of the leading causes of pancreatic cancer death is metastasis. In this report, we developed in vitro, a stable high-expression red fluorescent protein (RFP) transductant of the pancreatic cancer cells with a lentiviral expression vector containing the DsRed-2 RFP gene. These fluorescent pancreatic cancer cells were used to establish an orthotopic metastatic model and an experimental angiogenesis metastatic model of pancreatic cancer in nude mice. The high-level expression of RFP enables the imaging of distant micrometastases in their target organs. RFP expression did not interfere with the biological properties of the transformed cells compared to the parental cell line. We also demonstrated that lentiviral-transduced pancreatic cancer cells maintained stable high-level RFP expression during their growth in vitro and in vivo. The fluorescence was sufficient to noninvasively image tumor growth and metastasis, even in deep tissue such as the lung. The results indicate the benefit of lentivirus transfection of cancer cells for high expression of RFP and for sensitive in vivo imaging of metastatic pancreatic cancer.
Related JoVE Video
Lentivirus-based DsRed-2-transfected pancreatic cancer cells for deep in vivo imaging of metastatic disease.
Methods Mol. Biol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. One of the leading causes of pancreatic cancer death is metastasis. The early stages of tumor progression and micrometastasis formation have been difficult to analyze and have been hampered by the inability to identify small numbers of tumor cells against a background of many host cells. The intrinsic brightness of fluorescent proteins has been taken advantage of to develop a technology of whole-body imaging of tumors and gene expression in mouse internal organs. Stable transformation with fluorescent protein genes can be effected using lentiviral vectors containing a selectable marker such as neomycin resistance. The cells that stably express fluorescent proteins can then be transplanted into appropriate mouse models. For whole-body imaging, nude mice are very appropriate, the hair does not need to be removed by shaving or depilation. The instruments used are very simple, they need appropriate excitation and emission filters. It is crucial that proper filters be used such that background autofluorescence is minimal. Fluorescent protein-based imaging technology can be used for whole-body imaging of fluorescent cells on essentially all organs.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.