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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Diversity and distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi along altitudinal gradients in Mount Taibai of the Qinling Mountains.
Can. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2014
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Elevational patterns of plant and animal diversity have been studied for centuries; however, the effects of land elevation on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal diversity remains unclear. We examined AM fungal diversity and distribution along 19 elevation belts in Mount Taibai of the Qinling Mountains, with the aim to assess the altitudinal diversity patterns. In total, 63 AM fungal taxa belonging to 12 genera were discovered. Mycorrhizal colonization rates on roots; AM fungal spore density; and fungal species richness, evenness, and diversity had different patterns in terms of the changes of elevation. Root colonization followed a cubical parabolic pattern, with a peak and a foot at an elevation of about 2000 and 3000 m above sea level, respectively. Species richness decreased monotonically from the lowest to the highest elevations. Spore density and ?-diversity exhibited a unimodal pattern and peaked at an elevation of 2107 and 1350 m, respectively. Species evenness increased monotonically at an elevation of between 1050 and 2250 m. ?-Diversity also presented a basically incremental pattern along altitudinal gradients. Our findings suggest that elevation changes were the main factor governing the patterns of AM fungal diversity.
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Scaling of nitrogen and phosphorus across plant organs in shrubland biomes across Northern China.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
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Allocation of limiting resources, such as nutrients, is an important adaptation strategy for plants. Plants may allocate different nutrients within a specific organ or the same nutrient among different organs. In this study, we investigated the allocation strategies of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in leaves, stems and roots of 126 shrub species from 172 shrubland communities in Northern China using scaling analyses. Results showed that N and P have different scaling relationships among plant organs. The scaling relationships of N concentration across different plant organs tended to be allometric between leaves and non-leaf organs, and isometric between non-leaf organs. Whilst the scaling relationships of P concentration tended to be allometric between roots and non-root organs, and isometric between non-root organs. In arid environments, plant tend to have higher nutrient concentration in leaves at given root or stem nutrient concentration. Evolutionary history affected the scaling relationships of N concentration slightly, but not affected those of P concentration. Despite fairly consistent nutrients allocation strategies existed in independently evolving lineages, evolutionary history and environments still led to variations on these strategies.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.