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In JoVE (1)

Other Publications (4)

Articles by Daniel E. Levin in JoVE

 JoVE Bioengineering

Tissue Engineering of the Intestine in a Murine Model

1Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Saban Research Institute, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California


JoVE 4279

This article and the accompanying video present our protocol for generating tissue-engineered intestine in the mouse, using an organoid units-on-scaffold approach.

Other articles by Daniel E. Levin on PubMed

Tissue-engineered Small Intestine

Tissue-engineering of the Gastrointestinal Tract

The purpose of this review is to describe recent advancements in tissue-engineering of the gastrointestinal system. For some patients, a congenital or acquired defect in the alimentary system results in digestive or nutritional deficiencies requiring intervention. Unfortunately, these treatments are associated with morbid complications. Advances in the growth of tissue-engineered esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon and anus have been made in recent years. The progress reviewed here hopefully will someday benefit patients with gastrointestinal organ loss by providing a tissue replacement with morphology and function similar to native tissue.

Giant Cystic Meconium Peritonitis Presenting in a Neonate with Classic Radiographic Eggshell Calcifications and Treated with an Elective Surgical Approach: a Case Report

Giant cystic meconium peritonitis is relatively rare. Patients often present with nonspecific physical findings such as distension and emesis. Plain abdominal films remain invaluable for identifying the characteristic calcifications seen with a meconium pseudocyst, and large eggshell calcifications are pathognomonic for the giant cystic subtype.

Human Tissue-engineered Colon Forms from Postnatal Progenitor Cells: an in Vivo Murine Model

Aim: Loss of colon reservoir function after colectomy can adversely affect patient outcomes. In previous work, human fetal intestinal cells developed epithelium without mesenchyme following implantation in mice. However, for humans, postnatal tissue would be the preferred donor source. We generated tissue-engineered colon (TEC) from postnatal human organoid units. Materials & methods: Organoid units were prepared from human colon waste specimens, loaded onto biodegradable scaffolds and implanted into immunocompromised mice. After 4 weeks, human TEC was harvested. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed human origin, identified differentiated epithelial cell types and verified the presence of supporting mesenchyme. Results: Human TEC demonstrated a simple columnar epithelium. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated human origin and the three differentiated cell types of mature colon epithelium. Key mesenchymal components (smooth muscle, intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts and ganglion cells) were seen. Conclusion: Colon can form from human progenitor cells on a scaffold in a mouse host. This proof-of-concept experiment is an important step in transitioning TEC to human therapy.

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