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Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of Aorta.
 JoVE Medicine

A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

1INSERM U698 Cardiovascular Remodelling, Hôpital X. Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, 2Bio-Ingénierie des Polymères Cardiovasculaires (BPC), Institut Galilée - Université Paris 13, Paris, France, 3Service de Chirurgie Vasculaire, Hôpital Henri Mondor, AP-HP, Université Paris-Est Creteil, 4Ecole de chirurgie de l'assistance publique des hôpitaux de Paris, 5Service de Chirurgie Cardiaque et Vasculaire, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, AP-HP, Université René Descartes


JoVE 50740

 JoVE Bioengineering

A Novel Stretching Platform for Applications in Cell and Tissue Mechanobiology

1Centre for Interdisciplinary NanoPhysics, Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 2University of Ottawa Heart Institue, University of Ottawa, 3Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, 4Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 5Institute for Science, Society and Policy, University of Ottawa


JoVE 51454

 JoVE Medicine

Evaluation of a Novel Laser-assisted Coronary Anastomotic Connector - the Trinity Clip - in a Porcine Off-pump Bypass Model

1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, 2Vascular Connect b.v., 3Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, 4Department of Experimental Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht


JoVE 52127

 JoVE Medicine

Microsurgical Venous Pouch Arterial-Bifurcation Aneurysms in the Rabbit Model: Technical Aspects

1Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital Rudolfstiftung, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Kantonsspital Aarau, 3Cerebrovascular Research Group, Department of Biomedical Research, Medical University of Vienna, 4Cerebrovascular Research Group, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Berne, 5Centre for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Department of Systematic Anatomy, Medical University of Vienna, 6Department of Neurology, Paracelsus University Salzburg


JoVE 2718

 JoVE Medicine

Inducing Myointimal Hyperplasia Versus Atherosclerosis in Mice: An Introduction of Two Valid Models

1Transplant and Stem Cell Immunobiology Lab, Cardiovascular Research Center, University Hospital Hamburg, 2Cardiovascular Research Center (CVRC) and DZHK University Hamburg, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Heart Center Hamburg, 4Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University, 5Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, 6Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, 7Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Falk Cardiovascular Research Center


JoVE 51459

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Cardiac Exam I: Inspection and Palpation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

The cardiac assessment is one of the core examinations performed by almost every physician whenever encountering a patient. Disorders of the cardiac system are among the most common reasons for hospital admission, with conditions ranging from myocardial infarction to congestive heart failure. Learning a complete and thorough cardiac examination is therefore crucial for any practicing physician. If there is pathology in the heart or circulatory system, the consequences can also be manifested in other bodily areas, including the lungs, abdomen, and legs. Many physicians instinctively reach straight for their stethoscopes when performing cardiac exams. However, a large amount of information is gained before auscultation by going through the correct sequence of examination, starting with inspection and palpation.

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam I: Inspection and Auscultation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Gastrointestinal disease accounts for millions of office visits and hospital admissions annually. Physical examination of the abdomen is a crucial tool in diagnosing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract; in addition, it can help identify pathological processes in cardiovascular, urinary, and other systems. As physical examination in general, the examination of the abdominal region is important for establishing physician-patient contact, for reaching the preliminary diagnosis and selecting subsequent laboratory and imaging tests, and determining the urgency of care. As with the other parts of a physical examination, visual inspection and auscultation of the abdomen are done in a systematic fashion so that no potential findings are missed. Special attention should be paid to potential problems already identified by the patient's history. Here we assume that the patient has already been identified, and has had history taken, symptoms discussed, and areas of potential concern identified. In this video we will not review the patient's history; instead, we will go directly to the physical examination. Before we get to the examination, let's briefly review s

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam III: Palpation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Abdominal palpation, if performed correctly, allows for examination of the large and relatively superficial organs; for a skilled examiner, it allows for assessment of the smaller and deeper structures as well. The amount of information that can be obtained by palpation of the abdominal area also depends on the anatomical characteristics of the patient. For example, obesity might make palpation of internal organs difficult and require that additional maneuvers be performed. Abdominal palpation provides valuable information regarding localization of the problem and its severity, as abdominal palpation identifies the areas of tenderness as well as presence of organomegaly and tumors. The specific focus of palpation is driven by the information collected during history taking and other elements of the abdominal exam. Palpation helps to integrate this information and develop the strategy for subsequent diagnostic steps.

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 JoVE Medicine

Measuring Ascending Aortic Stiffness In Vivo in Mice Using Ultrasound

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 3Department of Medicine (Cardiology), Johns Hopkins University, 4The Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University


JoVE 52200

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 JoVE Medicine

Calcification of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Imaging of Aortic Calcification and Inflammation

1Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research of the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division of the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 3Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 4Harvard Medical School, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, RWTH Aachen University, 6Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases and the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology of the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital


JoVE 54017

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Protocol for Relative Hydrodynamic Assessment of Tri-leaflet Polymer Valves

1Tissue Engineered Mechanics, Imaging and Materials Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 3College of Medicine, University of Florida, 4King Faisal Specialty Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia


JoVE 50335

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 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Cardiac Exam III: Abnormal Heart Sounds

JoVE Science Education

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Having a fundamental understanding of normal heart sounds is the first step toward distinguishing the normal from the abnormal. Murmurs are sounds that represent turbulent and abnormal blood flow across a heart valve. They are caused either by stenosis (valve area too narrow) or regurgitation (backflow of blood across the valve) and are commonly heard as a "swishing" sound during auscultation. Murmurs are graded from 1 to 6 in intensity (1 being the softest and 6 the loudest) (Figure 1). The most common cardiac murmurs heard are left-sided murmurs of the aortic and mitral valves. Right-sided murmurs of the pulmonary and tricuspid valves are less common. Murmurs are typically heard loudest at the anatomical area that corresponds with the valvular pathology. Frequently, they also radiate to other areas. Figure 1. The Levine scale used to grade murmur intensity. In addition to the two main heart sounds, S1 and S2, which are normally produced by the closing of heart valves, there are two other abnormal heart sounds, known as S3 and S4. These are also known as

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System

1Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2Department of Engineering Technology, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 3Department of Urology, Leiden University Medical Center, 4Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School


JoVE 52750

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