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Cell Separation:
 JoVE Biology

Separation of Spermatogenic Cell Types Using STA-PUT Velocity Sedimentation

1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 2Biomedical Graduate Studies, University of Pennsylvania, 3Department of Animal Biology and Center for Animal Transgenesis and Germ Cell Research, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, 5Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania

JoVE 50648

 JoVE Chemistry

CN-GELFrEE - Clear Native Gel-eluted Liquid Fraction Entrapment Electrophoresis

1Departments of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Proteomics Center of Excellence, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, 2Institute of Chemistry, Proteomics Unit, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, 3Department of Cell Biology, Brazilian Center for Protein Research, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Protein Chemistry, University of Brasilia

JoVE 53597

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Isolation of Myeloid Dendritic Cells and Epithelial Cells from Human Thymus

1Department of General Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 2Institute of Pharmacology, University of Bern, 3Department of Immunology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Clinic Tuebingen, 5Department of Neurology, University Hospital Erlangen

JoVE 50951

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Frozen Buffy Coats using Non-integrating Episomal Plasmids

1Center for Biomedicine, European Academy Bozen/Bolzano (EURAC), 2Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Fondazione IRCCS Ca´ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 3Del E. Webb Center for Neuroscience, Aging & Stem Cell Research, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

JoVE 52885

 JoVE Medicine

Rapid Fractionation and Isolation of Whole Blood Components in Samples Obtained from a Community-based Setting

1Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, 4Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 5Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 6Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 7Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University School of Medicine

JoVE 52227

 JoVE Medicine

Modeling Chemotherapy Resistant Leukemia In Vitro

1Alexander B. Osborn Hematopoietic Malignancy and Transplantation Program of the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine, 2Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine, 3Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine

JoVE 53645

 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

JoVE Science Education

Source: Dr. Paul Bower - Purdue University

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is an important analytical method commonly used to separate and quantify components of liquid samples. In this technique, a solution (first phase) is pumped through a column that contains a packing of small porous particles with a second phase bound to the surface. The different solubilities of the sample components in the two phases cause the components to move through the column with different average velocities, thus creating a separation of these components. The pumped solution is called the mobile phase, while the phase in the column is called the stationary phase. There are several modes of liquid chromatography, depending upon the type of stationary and/or mobile phase employed. This experiment uses reversed-phase chromatography, where the stationary phase is non-polar, and the mobile phase is polar. The stationary phase to be employed is C18 hydrocarbon groups bonded to 3-µm silica particles, while the mobile phase is an aqueous buffer with a polar organic modifier (acetonitrile) added to vary its eluting strength. In this form, the silica can be used for samples that are water-soluble, providing a broad range of applications. In this experiment, the mixtures of three components frequently found

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