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DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
 JoVE Genetics

The Use of Induced Somatic Sector Analysis (ISSA) for Studying Genes and Promoters Involved in Wood Formation and Secondary Stem Development

1School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne, 2Victorian AgriBiosciences Centre, La Trobe University R&D Park, 3College of Biological Sciences, Department of Plant Biology, University of California, Davis, 4Department of Genetics, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria

JoVE 54553

 JoVE Genetics

Genetic Manipulation of the Plant Pathogen Ustilago maydis to Study Fungal Biology and Plant Microbe Interactions

1Institute for Microbiology, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, 2Bioeconomy Science Center (BioSC), 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Applied Biosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 4Cluster of Excellence in Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf

JoVE 54522

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Testing For Genetically Modified Foods

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Genetic modification of foods has been a controversial issue due to debated concerns over health and environmental safety. This experiment demonstrates technical understanding of how food DNA is genetically identified, allowing for educated decision making about the safety and potential dangers of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food supplies. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used to amplify food DNA to test for the presence of genetically modified DNA in food products. Presence of specific DNA bands is detected by using gel electrophoresis to pull extracted food DNA through a 3% agarose gel, a concentration dense enough to separate the bands of DNA containing the genetically modified DNA. Several controls are used in the electrophoresis procedure to ensure DNA is successfully extracted from test foods (plant primer), and to provide known examples of both genetically modified DNA (purchased genetically modified DNA) and non-genetically modified DNA (purchased certified non-GMO food control).

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Fluorescence in situ Hybridizations (FISH) for the Localization of Viruses and Endosymbiotic Bacteria in Plant and Insect Tissues

1Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, 2Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 3Department of Applied Sciences, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, 4The Institute of Plant Sciences, Volcani Center

JoVE 51030

 JoVE Bioengineering

Lignin Down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and Klason Lignin Analysis

1The School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, 2Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, 3The Institute for Sustainable and Renewable Resources, The Institute for Advanced Learning and Research, 4Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University

JoVE 51340

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Phage Phenomics: Physiological Approaches to Characterize Novel Viral Proteins

1Department of Biology, San Diego State University, 2Computational Science Research Center, San Diego State University, 3Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics Research Center, San Diego State University, 4Department of Mathematics and Statistics, San Diego State University, 5Department of Computer Science, San Diego State University, 6Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 7SPARC Committee, Broad Institute

JoVE 52854

 JoVE Biology

Removal of Exogenous Materials from the Outer Portion of Frozen Cores to Investigate the Ancient Biological Communities Harbored Inside

1Biogeochemical Sciences Branch, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Hanover, NH, 2Environmental Processes Branch, Environmental Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, 3Terrestrial and Cryospheric Scienes Branch, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Hanover, NH, 4Biogeochemical Sciences Branch, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Fairbanks, AK

JoVE 54091

 JoVE Environment

Transcript and Metabolite Profiling for the Evaluation of Tobacco Tree and Poplar as Feedstock for the Bio-based Industry

1Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, 2School of Biological Sciences, Plant Molecular Science, Centre for Systems and Synthetic Biology, Royal Holloway, University of London, 3Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, 4Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, UGhent, 5Institute for Building Materials, ETH Zurich, 6Applied Wood Materials, EMPA, 7Division of Glycoscience, School of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 8European Research and Project Office GmbH, 9ABBA Gaia S.L., 10Pflanzenöltechnologie, 11Capax Environmental Services, 12Green Fuels, 13Neutral Consulting Ltd, 14Plant Cell Biology Research Centre, School of Botany, University of Melbourne

JoVE 51393

 JoVE Biology

An Easy Method for Plant Polysome Profiling

1Laboratoire de Génétique et Biophysique des Plantes, Aix-Marseille Université, 2UMR 7265 Biologie Végétale & Microbiologie Environnementales, CNRS, 3BIAM, CEA, 4Department of Biology, Biocenter, University of Copenhagen, 5Laboratoire de Chimie Bactérienne, 6CNRS, LCB UMR 7283, Aix Marseille Université

JoVE 54231

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Quantifying Environmental Microorganisms and Viruses Using qPCR

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), also known as real-time PCR, is a widely-used molecular technique for enumerating microorganisms in the environment. Prior to this approach, quantifying microorganisms was limited largely to classical culture-based techniques. However, the culturing of microbes from environmental samples can be particularly challenging, and it is generally held that as few as 1 to 10% of the microorganisms present within environmental samples are detectable using these techniques. The advent of qPCR in environmental microbiology research has therefore advanced the field greatly by allowing for more accurate determination of concentrations of microorganisms such as disease-causing pathogens in environmental samples. However, an important limitation of qPCR as an applied microbiological technique is that living, viable populations cannot be differentiated from inactive or non-living populations. This video demonstrates the use of qPCR to detect pepper mild mottle virus from an environmental water sample.

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