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Subcutaneous Fat: Fatty tissue under the Skin through out the body.
 JoVE Medicine

Performing and Processing FNA of Anterior Fat Pad for Amyloid

1Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2Current Address: Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit Medical Center, 3Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 4Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 5Division of Neoplastic Diseases and Related Disorders, Medical College of Wisconsin


JoVE 1747

 JoVE Medicine

Assessment of Viability of Human Fat Injection into Nude Mice with Micro-Computed Tomography

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine


JoVE 52217

 JoVE Medicine

A Mouse Tumor Model of Surgical Stress to Explore the Mechanisms of Postoperative Immunosuppression and Evaluate Novel Perioperative Immunotherapies

1Centre for Innovative Cancer Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 2Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, 3Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, 4Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, 5Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, University of Tabuk, 6Department of Surgery, Ottawa General Hospital


JoVE 51253

 JoVE Medicine

Murine Spinotrapezius Model to Assess the Impact of Arteriolar Ligation on Microvascular Function and Remodeling

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, 3Office of Animal Welfare, University of Virginia, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering & Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University


JoVE 50218

 JoVE Medicine

Evaluation of Tumor-infiltrating Leukocyte Subsets in a Subcutaneous Tumor Model

1Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 2Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, 3Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine


JoVE 52657

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Murine Dermal Fibroblast Isolation by FACS

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i


JoVE 53430

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Isolation and Enrichment of Human Adipose-derived Stromal Cells for Enhanced Osteogenesis

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University


JoVE 52181

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Percussion

JoVE Science Education

Source: Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Simply stated, percussion refers to the striking of one object against another to produce sound. In the early 1700s, an Austrian inn-keeper's son, named Leopold Auenbrugger, discovered that he could take inventory by tapping his father's beer barrels with his fingers. Years later, while practicing medicine in Vienna, he applied this technique to his patients and published the first description of the diagnostic utility of percussion in 1761. His findings faded into obscurity until the prominent French physician Jean-Nicolas Corvisart rediscovered his writings in 1808, during an era in which great attention was focused on diagnostic accuracy at the bedside.1 There are three types of percussion. Auenbrugger and Corvisart relied on direct percussion, in which the plexor (i.e. tapping) finger strikes directly against the patient's body. An indirect method is used more commonly today. In indirect percussion, the plexor finger strikes a pleximeter, which is typically the middle finger of the non-dominant hand placed against the patient's body. As the examiner's finger strikes the pleximeter (or directly against the surface of the patient's body)

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam I: Inspection and Auscultation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Gastrointestinal disease accounts for millions of office visits and hospital admissions annually. Physical examination of the abdomen is a crucial tool in diagnosing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract; in addition, it can help identify pathological processes in cardiovascular, urinary, and other systems. As physical examination in general, the examination of the abdominal region is important for establishing physician-patient contact, for reaching the preliminary diagnosis and selecting subsequent laboratory and imaging tests, and determining the urgency of care. As with the other parts of a physical examination, visual inspection and auscultation of the abdomen are done in a systematic fashion so that no potential findings are missed. Special attention should be paid to potential problems already identified by the patient's history. Here we assume that the patient has already been identified, and has had history taken, symptoms discussed, and areas of potential concern identified. In this video we will not review the patient's history; instead, we will go directly to the physical examination. Before we get to the examination, let's briefly review s

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