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Articles by Tambudzai Shamu in JoVE

 JoVE Biology

Visualization of the Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC) Network in Mice

1Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 2Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 3Developmental Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 4Howard Hughes, Medical Institute, 5Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, The Rockefeller University


JoVE 2802

The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They form complex networks between smooth muscle cells and post-ganglionic neuronal fibers to regulate GI contractility. Here, we present immunofluorescence methods cross-sectional and whole-mount visualization of murine ICC networks.

Other articles by Tambudzai Shamu on PubMed

ETV1 is a Lineage Survival Factor That Cooperates with KIT in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours

Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common human sarcoma and is primarily defined by activating mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinases. KIT is highly expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs)-the presumed cell of origin for GIST-as well as in haematopoietic stem cells, melanocytes, mast cells and germ cells. Yet, families harbouring germline activating KIT mutations and mice with knock-in Kit mutations almost exclusively develop ICC hyperplasia and GIST, suggesting that the cellular context is important for KIT to mediate oncogenesis. Here we show that the ETS family member ETV1 is highly expressed in the subtypes of ICCs sensitive to oncogenic KIT mediated transformation, and is required for their development. In addition, ETV1 is universally highly expressed in GISTs and is required for growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant GIST cell lines. Transcriptome profiling and global analyses of ETV1-binding sites suggest that ETV1 is a master regulator of an ICC-GIST-specific transcription network mainly through enhancer binding. The ETV1 transcriptional program is further regulated by activated KIT, which prolongs ETV1 protein stability and cooperates with ETV1 to promote tumorigenesis. We propose that GIST arises from ICCs with high levels of endogenous ETV1 expression that, when coupled with an activating KIT mutation, drives an oncogenic ETS transcriptional program. This differs from other ETS-dependent tumours such as prostate cancer, melanoma and Ewing sarcoma where genomic translocation or amplification drives aberrant ETS expression. It also represents a novel mechanism of oncogenic transcription factor activation.

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