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 JoVE Environment

Use of a Filter Cartridge for Filtration of Water Samples and Extraction of Environmental DNA

1Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Natural History Museum and Institute, Chiba, 2Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, 3Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, 4Okinawa Churashima Research Center, 5Graduate School of Simulation Studies, University of Hyogo


JoVE 54741

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 JoVE Environment

Development of Sulfidogenic Sludge from Marine Sediments and Trichloroethylene Reduction in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor

1Bioprocesses Department, Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnología, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 2Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Escuela Superior de Medicina, Instituto Politécnico Nacional


JoVE 52956

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Phage Phenomics: Physiological Approaches to Characterize Novel Viral Proteins

1Department of Biology, San Diego State University, 2Computational Science Research Center, San Diego State University, 3Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics Research Center, San Diego State University, 4Department of Mathematics and Statistics, San Diego State University, 5Department of Computer Science, San Diego State University, 6Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 7SPARC Committee, Broad Institute


JoVE 52854

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 JoVE In-Press

Characterization of Calcification Events Using Live Optical and Electron Microscopy Techniques in a Marine Tubeworm

1Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 2Department of Marine Biodiversity Research (BioDive), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), 3Advanced Material Research Laboratory (AMRL), Clemson University, 4Swire Institute of Marine Sciences and School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong

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JoVE 55164

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 Science Education: Essentials of Earth Science

An Overview of Alkenone Biomarker Analysis for Paleothermometry

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

Throughout this series of videos, natural samples were extracted and purified in search of organic compounds, called biomarkers, that can relate information on climates and environments of the past. One of the samples analyzed was sediment. Sediments accumulate over geologic time in basins, depressions in the Earth into which sediment flows through the action of fluid (water or air), movement, and gravity. Two main types of basins exist, marine (oceans and seas) and lacustrine (lakes). As one might guess, very different types of life live in these settings, driven in large part by the difference in salinity between them. Over the last few decades, organic geochemists discovered a toolbox of biomarker proxies, or compounds that can be used to describe climate or environment, some of which work in marine environments and some of which work in lacustrine. We turn our attention here to the marine realm and alkenone paleothermometry using the Uk'37 sea surface temperature proxy. The most well-established and widely applied open-ocean biomarker sea surface temperature (SST) proxy is Uk'37. Uk'37 = (C37:2) / (C37:2 + C37:

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 JoVE Chemistry

Characterization, Quantification and Compound-specific Isotopic Analysis of Pyrogenic Carbon Using Benzene Polycarboxylic Acids (BPCA)

1Department of Geography, University of Zurich, 2Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of South Carolina, 3Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zurich, 4Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 5Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University


JoVE 53922

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 Science Education: Essentials of Earth Science

Soxhlet Extraction of Lipid Biomarkers from Sediment

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

Every lab needs standards that track the performance, accuracy, and precision of its instruments over time to ensure a measurement made today is the same as a measurement made a year from now (Figure 1). Because standards must test the performance of instruments over a long period of time, large volumes of the standards are often required. Many chemical standards can be purchased from retail scientific companies, like Sigma-Aldrich and Fisher. However, some compounds that occur in nature and that are relevant to paleoclimatic studies have not yet been isolated and purified for purchase. Therefore, these compounds need to be extracted from natural samples, and because of the large volumes of standards required, large volumes of sediment need to be extracted. The Accelerated Solvent Extraction (Dionex) and sonication extractions are not appropriate for the extraction of such large sediment volumes. In these circumstances, a Soxhlet extraction is used. Figure 1. Schematic depicting how chemical standard tracks the performance of an instrument through time. The dashed line represents a

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