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Retinoblastoma Protein: Product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. It is a nuclear phosphoprotein hypothesized to normally act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Rb protein is absent in retinoblastoma cell lines. It also has been shown to form complexes with the adenovirus E1a protein, the Sv40 t antigen, and the human papilloma virus E7 protein.

Negative Regulator Molecules

JoVE 10764

Positive regulators allow a cell to advance through cell cycle checkpoints. Negative regulators have an equally important role as they terminate a cell’s progression through the cell cycle—or pause it—until the cell meets specific criteria.

Three of the best-understood negative regulators are p53, p21, and retinoblastoma protein (Rb). The regulatory roles of each of these proteins were discovered after faulty copies were found in cells with uncontrolled replication (i.e., cancer). These proteins exert most of their regulatory effects at the G1 checkpoint early in the cell cycle. P53 strongly influences a cell’s commitment to divide. It responds to DNA damage by discontinuing the cell cycle and summoning enzymes to repair the damage. If the DNA damage is irreparable, p53 can prevent the cell from proceeding through the cell cycle by inducing apoptosis, or cell death. An increase in p53 triggers the production of p21. P21 prevents the cell from transitioning from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle by binding to CDK/cyclin complexes, inhibiting their positive regulatory actions. Rb negatively regulates the cell cycle by acting on different positive regulators, mainly in response to cell size. Active (dephosphorylated) Rb binds to transcription factors, preventing them from initiating gene tran

 Core: Cell Cycle and Division

Analysis of Combinatorial miRNA Treatments to Regulate Cell Cycle and Angiogenesis

1School of Basic Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana Monroe, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

JoVE 59460

 Cancer Research

A Protein Preparation Method for the High-throughput Identification of Proteins Interacting with a Nuclear Cofactor Using LC-MS/MS Analysis

1Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 2Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Jahangirnagar University, 3Division of Cell Regeneration and Transplantation, School of Medicine, Nihon University, 4Institute of Genetics and Animal Breeding of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 5Graduate School of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University

JoVE 55077

 Biochemistry
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