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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Plasmid pLK39 Isolated from Endophytic Salmonella sp. Isolated from Solanum lycocarpum.
Curr. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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The complete nucleotide sequence of a small cryptic plasmid pLK39 isolated from endophytic Salmonella sp. was determined. This plasmid is 4,029 bp long with an overall GC content of 55.4 %. Sequence analyses of pLK39 revealed extensive homology to several plasmids: pRK10, pK, pSW200, pBERT, pST728/06-2, pSW100, pEC3, and pUCD5000. Using the ORF Finder program, 35 putative ORFs was identified, 30 showed more than 35 residues. After performing a search for homologous sequences to the pLK39 at BLASTn software on NCBI, it was ascertained that the plasmid has a ColE1-like replication origin and also a region of mobilization proteins from relaxase family (mobCABD). Besides these mobilization proteins, the pLK39 codes a putative DUF903 protein family, which is characterized as assumed external cytoplasmic membrane lipoprotein. A recombinant form of pLK39 carrying a kanamycin resistance gene is stably maintained in Escherichia coli cells grown in the absence of selection pressure. pLK39 was compatible with pUC18, pBR322, and pACYC184.
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Identification of mycoparasitism-related genes against the phytopathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum through transcriptome and expression profile analysis in Trichoderma harzianum.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2014
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The species of T. harzianum are well known for their biocontrol activity against plant pathogens. However, few studies have been conducted to further our understanding of its role as a biological control agent against S. sclerotiorum, a pathogen involved in several crop diseases around the world. In this study, we have used RNA-seq and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) techniques in order to explore changes in T. harzianum gene expression during growth on cell wall of S. sclerotiorum (SSCW) or glucose. RT-qPCR was also used to examine genes potentially involved in biocontrol, during confrontation between T. harzianum and S. sclerotiorum.
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Traditional and Modern Plant Breeding Methods with Examples in Rice ( Oryza sativa L.).
J. Agric. Food Chem.
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2013
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Plant breeding can be broadly defined as alterations caused in plants as a result of their use by humans, ranging from unintentional changes resulting from the advent of agriculture to the application of molecular tools for precision breeding. The vast diversity of breeding methods can be simplified into three categories: (i) plant breeding based on observed variation by selection of plants based on natural variants appearing in nature or within traditional varieties; (ii) plant breeding based on controlled mating by selection of plants presenting recombination of desirable genes from different parents; and (iii) plant breeding based on monitored recombination by selection of specific genes or marker profiles, using molecular tools for tracking within-genome variation. The continuous application of traditional breeding methods in a given species could lead to the narrowing of the gene pool from which cultivars are drawn, rendering crops vulnerable to biotic and abiotic stresses and hampering future progress. Several methods have been devised for introducing exotic variation into elite germplasm without undesirable effects. Cases in rice are given to illustrate the potential and limitations of different breeding approaches.
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Comparative proteomics in the genus Paracoccidioides.
Fungal Genet. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2013
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The genus Paracoccidioides comprises a complex of phylogenetic species of dimorphic pathogenic fungi, the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a disease confined to Latin America and of marked relevance in its endemic areas due to its high frequency and severity. The members of the Paracoccidioides genus are distributed in distinct phylogenetic species (S1, PS2, PS3 and 01-like) that potentially differ in their biochemical and molecular characteristics. In this work, we performed the proteomic characterization of different members of the genus Paracoccidioides. We compared the proteomic profiles of Pb01 (01-like), Pb2 (PS2), Pb339 (S1) and PbEPM83 (PS3) using 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The proteins/isoforms were selected based on the staining intensity of the spots as determined by image analysis. The proteins/isoforms were in-gel digested and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and ion fragmentation. A total of 714 spots were detected, of which 343 were analyzed. From these spots, 301 represented differentially expressed proteins/isoforms among the four analyzed isolates, as determined by ANOVA. After applying the FDR correction, a total of 267 spots were determined to be differentially expressed. From the total, 193 proteins/isoforms were identified by PMF and confirmed by ion fragmentation. Comparing the expression profiles of the isolates, the proteins/isoforms that were related to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and to alcohol fermentation were more abundant in Pb01 than in other representatives of the genus Paracoccidioides, indicating ahigher use of anaerobic pathways for energy production. Those enzymes related to the oxidative stress response were more abundant in Pb01, Pb2 and Pb339, indicating a better response to ROS in these members of the Paracoccidioides complex. The enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway were abundant in Pb2. Antigenic proteins, such as GP43 and a 27-kDa antigenic protein, were less abundant in Pb01 and Pb2. The proteomic profile indicates metabolic differences among the analyzed members of the Paracoccidioides genus.
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Identification of differentially expressed genes from Trichoderma harzianum during growth on cell wall of Fusarium solani as a tool for biotechnological application.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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The species of T. harzianum are well known for their biocontrol activity against many plant pathogens. However, there is a lack of studies concerning its use as a biological control agent against F. solani, a pathogen involved in several crop diseases. In this study, we have used subtractive library hybridization (SSH) and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) techniques in order to explore changes in T. harzianum genes expression during growth on cell wall of F. solani (FSCW) or glucose. RT-qPCR was also used to examine the regulation of 18 genes, potentially involved in biocontrol, during confrontation between T. harzianum and F. solani.
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Association mapping for yield and grain quality traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.).
Genet. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2010
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Association analysis was applied to a panel of accessions of Embrapa Rice Core Collection (ERiCC) with 86 SSR and field data from two experiments. A clear subdivision between lowland and upland accessions was apparent, thereby indicating the presence of population structure. Thirty-two accessions with admixed ancestry were identified through structure analysis, these being discarded from association analysis, thus leaving 210 accessions subdivided into two panels. The association of yield and grain-quality traits with SSR was undertaken with a mixed linear model, with markers and subpopulation as fixed factors, and kinship matrix as a random factor. Eight markers from the two appraised panels showed significant association with four different traits, although only one (RM190) maintained the marker-trait association across years and cultivation. The significant association detected between amylose content and RM190 was in agreement with previous QTL analyses in the literature. Herein, the feasibility of undertaking association analysis in conjunction with germplasm characterization was demonstrated, even when considering low marker density. The high linkage disequilibrium expected in rice lines and cultivars facilitates the detection of marker-trait associations for implementing marker assisted selection, and the mining of alleles related to important traits in germplasm.
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Mass mortality associated with a frog virus 3-like Ranavirus infection in farmed tadpoles Rana catesbeiana from Brazil.
Dis. Aquat. Org.
PUBLISHED: 11-27-2009
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Ranaviruses (Iridoviridae) are increasingly associated with mortality events in amphibians, fish, and reptiles. They have been recently associated with mass mortality events in Brazilian farmed tadpoles of the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana Shaw, 1802. The objectives of the present study were to further characterize the virus isolated from sick R. catesbeiana tadpoles and confirm the etiology in these outbreaks. Sick tadpoles were collected in 3 farms located in Goiás State, Brazil, from 2003 to 2005 and processed for virus isolation and characterization, microbiology, histopathology, and parasitology. The phylogenetic relationships of Rana catesbeiana ranavirus (RCV-BR) with other genus members was investigated by PCR with primers specific for the major capsid protein gene (MCP) and the RNA polymerase DNA-dependent gene (Pol II). Sequence analysis and multiple alignments for MCP products showed >99% amino acid identity with other ranaviruses, while Pol II products showed 100% identity. Further diagnostics of the pathology including histology and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the viral etiology of these mass deaths. As far as we know, this is the first report of a ranaviral infection affecting aquatic organisms in Brazil. Additionally, our results suggest that American bullfrogs may have served as a vector of transmission of this virus, which highlights the potential threat of amphibian translocation in the world distribution of pathogens.
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Biochemical and metabolic profiles of Trichoderma strains isolated from common bean crops in the Brazilian Cerrado, and potential antagonism against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.
Fungal Biol
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Some species of Trichoderma have successfully been used in the commercial biological control of fungal pathogens, e.g., Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, an economically important pathogen of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objectives of the present study were (1) to provide molecular characterization of Trichoderma strains isolated from the Brazilian Cerrado; (2) to assess the metabolic profile of each strain by means of Biolog FF Microplates; and (3) to evaluate the ability of each strain to antagonize S. sclerotiorum via the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs), volatile antibiotics, and dual-culture tests. Among 21 isolates, we identified 42.86% as Trichoderma asperellum, 33.33% as Trichoderma harzianum, 14.29% as Trichoderma tomentosum, 4.76% as Trichoderma koningiopsis, and 4.76% as Trichoderma erinaceum. Trichoderma asperellum showed the highest CWDE activity. However, no species secreted a specific group of CWDEs. Trichoderma asperellum 364/01, T. asperellum 483/02, and T. asperellum 356/02 exhibited high and medium specific activities for key enzymes in the mycoparasitic process, but a low capacity for antagonism. We observed no significant correlation between CWDE and antagonism, or between metabolic profile and antagonism. The diversity of Trichoderma species, and in particular of T. harzianum, was clearly reflected in their metabolic profiles. Our findings indicate that the selection of Trichoderma candidates for biological control should be based primarily on the environmental fitness of competitive isolates and the target pathogen.
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