JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Results of a prospective multicentre myeloablative double-unit cord blood transplantation trial in adult patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplasia.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Double-unit cord blood (CB) grafts may improve engraftment and relapse risk in adults with haematological malignancies. We performed a prospective high-dose myeloablative double-unit CB transplantation (CBT) trial in adults with high-risk acute leukaemia or myelodysplasia (MDS) between 2007 and 2011. The primary aim was to establish the 1-year overall survival in a multi-centre setting. Fifty-six patients (31 acute myeloid leukaemia, 19 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 4 other acute leukaemias, 2 myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS]) were transplanted at 10 centres. The median infused total nucleated cell doses were 2·62 (larger unit) and 2·02 (smaller unit) x 10(7) /kg. The cumulative incidence of day 100 neutrophil engraftment was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80-96). Day 180 grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence was 64% (95%CI: 51-76) and 36% (95%CI: 24-49) of patients had chronic GVHD by 3-years. At 3-years post-transplant, the transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 39% (95%CI: 26-52), and the 3-year relapse incidence was 11% (95%CI: 4-21). With a median 37-month (range 23-71) follow-up of survivors, the 3-year disease-free survival was 50% (95%CI: 37-63). Double-unit CBT is a viable alternative therapy for high-risk acute leukaemia/ MDS in patients lacking a matched unrelated donor. This is especially important for minority patients. The relapse incidence was low but strategies to ameliorate TRM are needed.
Related JoVE Video
Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.