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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Exercise induction of gut microbiota modifications in obese, non-obese and hypertensive rats.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2014
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Obesity is a multifactor disease associated with cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension. Recently, gut microbiota was linked to obesity pathogenesisand shown to influence the host metabolism. Moreover, several factors such as host-genotype and life-style have been shown to modulate gut microbiota composition. Exercise is a well-known agent used for the treatment of numerous pathologies, such as obesity and hypertension; it has recently been demonstrated to shape gut microbiota consortia. Since exercise-altered microbiota could possibly improve the treatment of diseases related to dysfunctional microbiota, this study aimed to examine the effect of controlled exercise training on gut microbial composition in Obese rats (n = 3), non-obese Wistar rats (n = 3) and Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (n = 3). Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from fecal samples collected before and after exercise training was used for this purpose.
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Soil Acidobacterial 16S rRNA Gene Sequences Reveal Subgroup Level Differences between Savanna-Like Cerrado and Atlantic Forest Brazilian Biomes.
Int J Microbiol
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2014
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16S rRNA sequences from the phylum Acidobacteria have been commonly reported from soil microbial communities, including those from the Brazilian Savanna (Cerrado) and the Atlantic Forest biomes, two biomes that present contrasting characteristics of soil and vegetation. Using 16S rRNA sequences, the present work aimed to study acidobacterial diversity and distribution in soils of Cerrado savanna and two Atlantic forest sites. PCA and phylogenetic reconstruction showed that the acidobacterial communities found in "Mata de galeria" forest soil samples from the Cerrado biome have a tendency to separate from the other Cerrado vegetation microbial communities in the direction of those found in the Atlantic Forest, which is correlated with a high abundance of Acidobacteria subgroup 2 (GP2). Environmental conditions seem to promote a negative correlation between GP2 and subgroup 1 (GP1) abundance. Also GP2 is negatively correlated to pH, but positively correlated to high Al(3+) concentrations. The Cerrado soil showed the lowest Acidobacteria richness and diversity indexes of OTUs at the species and subgroups levels when compared to Atlantic Forest soils. These results suggest specificity of acidobacterial subgroups to soils of different biomes and are a starting point to understand their ecological roles, a topic that needs to be further explored.
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Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes.
Front Microbiol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have been completely lost. As an alternative, metagenomics has been used as a reliable approach to reveal the prospective reservoir of antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes in the uncultured microbial community that inhabits a number of environments. In this context, this review will focus on resistance genes as well as on novel antibiotics revealed by a metagenomics approach from the soil environment. Biotechnology prospects are also discussed, opening new frontiers for antibiotic development.
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Combining "omics" strategies to analyze the biotechnological potential of complex microbial environments.
Curr. Protein Pept. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2013
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It is well established in the scientific literature that only a small fraction of microorganisms can be cultured by conventional microbiology methods. The ever cheaper and faster DNA sequencing methods, together with advances in bioinformatics, have improved our understanding of the structure and functional behavior of microbial communities in many complex environments. However, the metagenomics approach alone cannot elucidate the functionality of all microorganisms, because a vast number of potentially new genes have no homologs in public databases. Metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics are approaches based on different techniques and have recently emerged as promising techniques to describe microbial activities within a given environment at the molecular level. In this review, we will discuss current developments and applications of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics, and their limitations in the study of microbial communities. The combined analysis of genes, mRNA and protein in complex microbial environments will be key to identify novel biological molecules for biotechnological purposes.
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Construction and validation of two metagenomic DNA libraries from Cerrado soil with high clay content.
Biotechnol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2011
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A challenge of metagenomic studies is in the extraction and purification of DNA from environmental samples. The soils of the Cerrado region of Brazil present several technical difficulties to DNA extraction: high clay content (>55% w/w), low pH (4.7) and high iron levels (146 ppm). Here we describe for the first time the efficient recovery and purification of microbial DNA associated with these unusual soil characteristics and the construction and validation of two metagenomic libraries: a 150,000 clones library with insert size of approximately 8 kb and a 65,000 clones library with insert size of approximately 35 kb. The construction of these metagenomic libraries will allow the biotechnological exploitation of the microbial community present in the soil from this endangered biome.
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Bacteria and Archaea community structure in the rumen microbiome of goats (Capra hircus) from the semiarid region of Brazil.
Anaerobe
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Most studies present in the literature about the rumen microbiome have focused on cattle and sheep. This is the first report of the characterization of the bacterial and archaeal communities present in the liquid and solid-associated fractions of the rumen from free ranging Moxotó breed goats using 16S rRNA gene libraries. PCR was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene with bacterial and archaeal universal primers and sequences from each library constructed were obtained. Sequences of Bacteria from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were predominant. The overall dominant classes in the rumen were Clostridia and Bacteroidia, which are known to play a role in plant fiber degradation in other ruminants. Unclassified Bacteria accounted for 4.7% of the liquid fraction sequences and 16.4% of the solid fraction sequences. From the archaeal libraries only sequences from the phylum Euryarcheota were identified and were assigned to the class Methanobacteria of the genera Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. A group of Archaea not previously known to be associated with the rumen was identified: uncultured methanogens belonging to the "uncultured marine bacteria" groups II and III. The local water contained high salt concentrations and this may explain the presence of these groups in the Moxotó goat rumen.
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Bacterial community associated with healthy and diseased reef coral Mussismilia hispida from eastern Brazil.
Microb. Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2010
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In order to characterize the bacterial community diversity associated to mucus of the coral Mussismilia hispida, four 16S rDNA libraries were constructed and 400 clones from each library were analyzed from two healthy colonies, one diseased colony and the surrounding water. Nine bacterial phyla were identified in healthy M. hispida, with a dominance of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Lentisphaerae, and Nitrospira. The most commonly found species were related to the genera Azospirillum, Hirschia, Fabibacter, Blastochloris, Stella, Vibrio, Flavobacterium, Ochrobactrum, Terasakiella, Alkalibacter, Staphylococcus, Azospirillum, Propionibacterium, Arcobacter, and Paenibacillus. In contrast, diseased M. hispida had a predominance of one single species of Bacteroidetes, corresponding to more than 70% of the sequences. Rarefaction curves using evolutionary distance of 1% showed a greater decrease in bacterial diversity in the diseased M. hispida, with a reduction of almost 85% in OTUs in comparison to healthy colonies. integral-Libshuff analyses show that significant p values obtained were <0.0001, demonstrating that the four libraries are significantly different. Furthermore, the sympatric corals M. hispida and Mussismilia braziliensis appear to have different bacterial community compositions according to Principal Component Analysis and Lineage-specific Analysis. Moreover, lineages that contribute to those differences were identified as alpha-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The results obtained in this study suggest host-microbe co-evolution in Mussismilia, and it was the first study on the diversity of the microbiota of the endemic and endangered of extinction Brazilian coral M. hispida from Abrolhos bank.
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Characterization of soil bacterial assemblies in Brazilian savanna-like vegetation reveals acidobacteria dominance.
Microb. Ecol.
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The Brazilian Cerrado is the second largest biome in Brazil and is considered a biodiversity hotspot. In this work, we compared the bacterial communities in Cerrado soil associated with four types of native vegetation (Cerrado Denso, Cerrado sensu stricto, Campo Sujo, and Mata de Galeria) by ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer analysis, terminal fragment restriction length polymorphism and pyrosequencing. The fingerprinting results were very similar. The bacterial communities of Cerrado Denso and Cerrado sensu stricto grouped together and were distinct from those in Campo Sujo and Mata de Galeria. Pyrosequencing generated approximately 40,000 16S rRNA gene sequences per sample and allowed the identification of 17 phyla in soil samples under Cerrado vegetation. Acidobacteria were dominant in all areas studied with a relative frequency of 40-47 %, followed closely by Proteobacteria accounting for 34-40 % of the sequences. Results from all molecular techniques used suggested that the bacterial communities of Cerrado sensu stricto and Cerrado Denso are very similar to each other, while Campo Sujo forms a separate group, and Mata de Galeria is the most distinct with higher species richness. This is the first extensive study of native Cerrado soil microbiota, an important but endangered biome.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.