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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel.
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Managing personal health information in distributed research network environments.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Studying rare outcomes, new interventions and diverse populations often requires collaborations across multiple health research partners. However, transferring healthcare research data from one institution to another can increase the risk of data privacy and security breaches.
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Managing protected health information in distributed research network environments: automated review to facilitate collaboration.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Multi-site health sciences research is becoming more common, as it enables investigation of rare outcomes and diseases and new healthcare innovations. Multi-site research usually involves the transfer of large amounts of research data between collaborators, which increases the potential for accidental disclosures of protected health information (PHI). Standard protocols for preventing release of PHI are extremely vulnerable to human error, particularly when the shared data sets are large.
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Whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analyses of two Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal-specific Podoviruses to other N4-like phages reveal extensive genetic diversity.
Virol. J.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal is the only serogroup other than O1 implicated in cholera epidemics. We describe the isolation and characterization of an O139 serogroup-specific phage, vB_VchP_VchO139-I (?VchO139-I) that has similar host range and virion morphology as phage vB_VchP_JA1 (?JA1) described previously. We aimed at a complete molecular characterization of both phages and elucidation of their genetic and structural differences and assessment of their genetic relatedness to the N4-like phage group.
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Arbovirus detection in insect vectors by rapid, high-throughput pyrosequencing.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2010
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Despite the global threat caused by arthropod-borne viruses, there is not an efficient method for screening vector populations to detect novel viral sequences. Current viral detection and surveillance methods based on culture can be costly and time consuming and are predicated on prior knowledge of the etiologic agent, as they rely on specific oligonucleotide primers or antibodies. Therefore, these techniques may be unsuitable for situations when the causative agent of an outbreak is unknown.
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Rapid identification of genetic modifications in Bacillus anthracis using whole genome draft sequences generated by 454 pyrosequencing.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2010
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The anthrax letter attacks of 2001 highlighted the need for rapid identification of biothreat agents not only for epidemiological surveillance of the intentional outbreak but also for implementing appropriate countermeasures, such as antibiotic treatment, in a timely manner to prevent further casualties. It is clear from the 2001 cases that survival may be markedly improved by administration of antimicrobial therapy during the early symptomatic phase of the illness; i.e., within 3 days of appearance of symptoms. Microbiological detection methods are feasible only for organisms that can be cultured in vitro and cannot detect all genetic modifications with the exception of antibiotic resistance. Currently available immuno or nucleic acid-based rapid detection assays utilize known, organism-specific proteins or genomic DNA signatures respectively. Hence, these assays lack the ability to detect novel natural variations or intentional genetic modifications that circumvent the targets of the detection assays or in the case of a biological attack using an antibiotic resistant or virulence enhanced Bacillus anthracis, to advise on therapeutic treatments.
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A Yersinia pestis-specific, lytic phage preparation significantly reduces viable Y. pestis on various hard surfaces experimentally contaminated with the bacterium.
Bacteriophage
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Five Y. pestis bacteriophages obtained from various sources were characterized to determine their biological properties, including their taxonomic classification, host range and genomic diversity. Four of the phages (YpP-G, Y, R and YpsP-G) belong to the Podoviridae family, and the fifth phage (YpsP-PST) belongs to the Myoviridae family, of the order Caudovirales comprising of double-stranded DNA phages. The genomes of the four Podoviridae phages were fully sequenced and found to be almost identical to each other and to those of two previously characterized Y. pestis phages Yepe2 and ?A1122. However, despite their genomic homogeneity, they varied in their ability to lyse Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains. The five phages were combined to yield a "phage cocktail" (tentatively designated "YPP-100") capable of lysing the 59 Y. pestis strains in our collection. YPP-100 was examined for its ability to decontaminate three different hard surfaces (glass, gypsum board and stainless steel) experimentally contaminated with a mixture of three genetically diverse Y. pestis strains CO92, KIM and 1670G. Five minutes of exposure to YPP-100 preparations containing phage concentrations of ca. 10(9), 10(8) and 10(7) PFU/mL completely eliminated all viable Y. pestis cells from all three surfaces, but a few viable cells were recovered from the stainless steel coupons treated with YPP-100 diluted to contain ca. 10(6) PFU/mL. However, even that highly diluted preparation significantly (p = < 0.05) reduced Y. pestis levels by ? 99.97%. Our data support the idea that Y. pestis phages may be useful for decontaminating various hard surfaces naturally- or intentionally-contaminated with Y. pestis.
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Novel high-molecular-weight, R-type bacteriocins of Clostridium difficile.
J. Bacteriol.
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Clostridium difficile causes one of the leading nosocomial infections in developed countries, and therapeutic choices are limited. Some strains of C. difficile produce phage tail-like particles upon induction of the SOS response. These particles have bactericidal activity against other C. difficile strains and can therefore be classified as bacteriocins, similar to the R-type pyocins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These R-type bacteriocin particles, which have been purified from different strains, each have a different C. difficile-killing spectrum, with no one bacteriocin killing all C. difficile isolates tested. We have identified the genetic locus of these "diffocins" (open reading frames 1359 to 1376) and have found them to be common among the species. The entire diffocin genetic locus of more than 20 kb was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis, and this resulted in production of bactericidal particles. One of the interesting features of these particles is a very large structural protein of ~200 kDa, the product of gene 1374. This large protein determines the killing spectrum of the particles and is likely the receptor-binding protein. Diffocins may provide an alternate bactericidal agent to prevent or treat infections and to decolonize individuals who are asymptomatic carriers.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.