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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Discharge properties of upper airway motor units during wakefulness and sleep.
Prog. Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2014
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Upper airway muscle motoneurons, as assessed at the level of the motor unit, have a range of different discharge patterns, varying as to whether their activity is modulated in phase with the respiratory cycle, are predominantly inspiratory or expiratory, or are phasic as opposed to tonic. Two fundamental questions raised by this observation are: how are synaptic inputs from premotor neurons distributed over motoneurons to achieve these different discharge patterns; and how do different discharge patterns contribute to muscle function? We and others have studied the behavior of genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) single motor units at transitions from wakefulness to sleep (sleep onset), from sleep to wakefulness (arousal from sleep), and during hypercapnia. Results indicate that decreases or increases in GG and TP muscle activity occur as a consequence of derecruitment or recruitment, respectively, of phasic and tonic inspiratory-modulated motoneurons, with only minor changes in rate coding. Further, sleep-wake state and chemical inputs to this "inspiratory system" appear to be mediated through the respiratory pattern generator. In contrast, phasic and tonic expiratory units and units with a purely tonic pattern, the "tonic system," are largely unaffected by sleep-wake state, and are only weakly influenced by chemical stimuli and the respiratory cycle. We speculate that the "inspiratory system" produces gross changes in upper airway muscle activity in response to changes in respiratory drive, while the "tonic system" fine tunes airway configuration with activity in this system being determined by local mechanical conditions.
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Enhanced Upper-Airway Muscle Responsiveness Is a Distinct Feature of Overweight/Obese Individuals without Sleep Apnea.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2014
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Body habitus is a major determinant of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, many individuals do not have OSA despite being overweight/obese (body mass index > 25 kg/m(2)) for reasons that are not fully elucidated.
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Arousal from Sleep Does Not Lead to Reduced Dilator Muscle Activity or Elevated Upper Airway Resistance on Return to Sleep in Healthy Individuals.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2014
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To compare changes in end-tidal CO2, genioglossus muscle activity and upper airway resistance following tone-induced arousal and the return to sleep in healthy individuals with small and large ventilatory responses to arousal.
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Local News Media Framing of Obesity in the Context of a Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Reduction Media Campaign.
J Nutr Educ Behav
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2014
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This study examined local news media's framing of obesity preceding and surrounding the Philadelphia sugar-sweetened beverage reduction media campaign.
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Physiological mechanisms of upper airway hypotonia during REM sleep.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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Rapid eye movement (REM)-induced hypotonia of the major upper airway dilating muscle (genioglossus) potentially contributes to the worsening of obstructive sleep apnea that occurs during this stage. No prior human single motor unit (SMU) study of genioglossus has examined this possibility to our knowledge. We hypothesized that genioglossus SMUs would reduce their activity during stable breathing in both tonic and phasic REM compared to stage N2 sleep. Further, we hypothesized that hypopneas occurring in REM would be associated with coincident reductions in genioglossus SMU activity.
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Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2014
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Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.
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Does the Effect of Exposure to TV Sex on Adolescent Sexual Behavior Vary by Genre?
Communic Res
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2013
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Using the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction, this study examines the effects of exposure to sexual content on television by genre, specifically looking at comedy, drama, cartoon, and reality programs, on adolescents sex-related cognitions and behaviors. Additionally, we compared the amount and explicitness of sexual content as well as the frequency of risk and responsibility messages in these four genres. Findings show that overall exposure to sexual content on television was not related to teens engagement in sexual intercourse the following year. When examined by genre, exposure to sexual content in comedies was positively associated while exposure to sexual content in dramas was negatively associated with attitudes regarding sex, perceived normative pressure, intentions, and engaging in sex one year later. Implications of adolescent exposure to various types of content and for using genre categories to examine exposure and effects are discussed.
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Adult obstructive sleep apnoea.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2013
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Obstructive sleep apnoea is an increasingly common disorder of repeated upper airway collapse during sleep, leading to oxygen desaturation and disrupted sleep. Features include snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleepiness. Pathogenesis varies; predisposing factors include small upper airway lumen, unstable respiratory control, low arousal threshold, small lung volume, and dysfunctional upper airway dilator muscles. Risk factors include obesity, male sex, age, menopause, fluid retention, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and smoking. Obstructive sleep apnoea causes sleepiness, road traffic accidents, and probably systemic hypertension. It has also been linked to myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and diabetes mellitus though not definitively. Continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice, with adherence of 60-70%. Bi-level positive airway pressure or adaptive servo-ventilation can be used for patients who are intolerant to continuous positive airway pressure. Other treatments include dental devices, surgery, and weight loss.
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The relationship between parents and childrens television viewing.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2013
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To examine the effect of parental television viewing on childrens television viewing compared with traditional predictors such as household television access, parental rules, and demographic characteristics of the child, parent, and household.
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Defining phenotypic causes of obstructive sleep apnea. Identification of novel therapeutic targets.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2013
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The pathophysiologic causes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) likely vary among patients but have not been well characterized.
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Motor unit activity in upper airway muscles genioglossus and tensor palatini.
Respir Physiol Neurobiol
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Common oscillatory inputs to genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) motoneurons were assessed using coherence analysis. Oscillations in the ranges 0-5 Hz (common drive) and 10-30 Hz (short term synchrony) were analyzed. GG and TP electromyograms were recorded via intramuscular fine wire electrodes in 32 subjects during wakefulness. Coherence analysis was conducted on 201 pairs of motor units paired according to their discharge patterns. Results were similar for the two muscles. Common drive was significantly higher for unilateral than bilateral pairs of units (p<.001), and was highest in Inspiratory Tonic pairs and lowest in Tonic pairs (p<.001). Pairs constructed from one muscle had higher common drive than pairs from two muscles (p<.001), the difference being greater for tonic pairs (interaction effect, p=.003). Short term synchrony was weak. The results indicate strong common drive to GG and TP phasic motoneurons, while common drive to Tonic motoneurons was weaker and idiosyncratic to each muscle.
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A mechanism for upper airway stability during slow wave sleep.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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The severity of obstructive sleep apnea is diminished (sometimes markedly) during slow wave sleep (SWS). We sought to understand why SWS stabilizes the upper airway. Increased single motor unit (SMU) activity of the major upper airway dilating muscle (genioglossus) should improve upper airway stability. Therefore, we hypothesized that genioglossus SMUs would increase their activity during SWS in comparison with Stage N2 sleep.
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Predictors of parents intention to limit childrens television viewing.
J Public Health (Oxf)
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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Scientific evidence demonstrates a link between viewing time and several poor health outcomes. We use a reasoned action approach to identify the determinants and beliefs associated with parents intention to limit their childrens television viewing.
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Treating obstructive sleep apnea with hypoglossal nerve stimulation.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2011
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Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is fundamental to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HGNS) counteracts this problem, with potential to reduce OSA severity.
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Neurogenic changes in the upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2011
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Controversy persists regarding the presence and importance of hypoglossal nerve dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
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Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2011
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Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression.
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Termination of respiratory events with and without cortical arousal in obstructive sleep apnea.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2011
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A total of 20-30% of respiratory events in obstructive sleep apnea are terminated without clear arousal. Arousals are thought to predispose to further events by promoting hyperventilation, hypocapnia, and upper-airway dilator muscle hypotonia. Therefore, events terminated without arousal may promote stable breathing.
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Sleep and cardiovascular regulation.
Pflugers Arch.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2011
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Normal sleep has a profound effect on the cardiovascular system, reducing cardiovascular activity throughout non-rapid eye movement sleep; changes that are modified and augmented by circadian system influence. There is also evidence that sleep-initiated changes in autonomic balance may in turn modify the development of sleep within a night, particularly the development of slow wave sleep. It is assumed that the cardiovascular changes that accompany sleep reflect a functional aspect of sleep, although the precise functional role has not been agreed upon. Nevertheless, there is good evidence that the cardiovascular changes that occur during normal sleep are beneficial for the cardiovascular system. Arousals from sleep, which are common even in normal sleep, are associated with a surge in activity in cardiorespiratory systems, with marked effects on the sleep-related pattern of cardiovascular activity when they occur frequently. Despite the importance of this aspect of sleep, controversy remains as to both the nature of the activation response and the circumstances under which it is elicited. The concept that sleep-related changes in cardiovascular activity are beneficial leads to the corollary that sleep disturbance would result in adverse cardiovascular consequences. While there is strong empirical evidence for such a relationship, it remains unclear whether this is a direct effect or, as has been suggested recently, the effect of disturbed sleep is mediated via stress-related modification of neuroendocrine systems.
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Identifying the causal pathways from religiosity to delayed adolescent sexual behavior.
J Sex Res
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2011
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This study used the Integrative Model as a framework to examine whether religiosity delays onset of coitus among a longitudinal sample of virgins, and investigated the causal pathways of this relationship. In addition, this study examined the behavioral beliefs about the consequences of engaging in sex, which distinguishes between youth who vary in level of religiosity. A further analysis was also conducted to examine whether religiosity offers protective effects in terms of progression toward sexual intercourse on a sexual behavior index. The sexual behavior index assumes a progressive nature of sexual behaviors, and includes the following seven behaviors: kissing, having breasts touched (touching for boys), genital touching, receiving oral sex, vaginal intercourse, giving oral sex, and receiving (or giving) anal sex. Religiosity at baseline was negatively associated with sexual debut one year later. This relationship was mediated through attitudes toward personally engaging in sexual intercourse. Religiosity at baseline was also negatively associated with scores on the sexual behavior index one year later. These results suggest that religiosity offers protective effects for both coital and noncoital sexual behaviors.
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Using the Integrative Model to explain how exposure to sexual media content influences adolescent sexual behavior.
Health Educ Behav
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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Published research demonstrates an association between exposure to media sexual content and a variety of sex-related outcomes for adolescents. What is not known is the mechanism through which sexual content produces this "media effect" on adolescent beliefs, attitudes, and behavior. Using the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction, this article uses data from a longitudinal study of adolescents ages 16 to 18 (N = 460) to determine how exposure to sexual media content influences sexual behavior. Path analysis and structural equation modeling demonstrated that intention to engage in sexual intercourse is determined by a combination of attitudes, normative pressure, and self-efficacy but that exposure to sexual media content only affects normative pressure beliefs. By applying the Integrative Model, we are able to identify which beliefs are influenced by exposure to media sex and improve the ability of health educators, researchers, and others to design effective messages for health communication campaigns and messages pertaining to adolescents engaging in sexual intercourse.
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A method for measuring and modeling the physiological traits causing obstructive sleep apnea.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2011
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There is not a clinically available technique for measuring the physiological traits causing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Therefore, it is often difficult to determine why an individual has OSA or to what extent the various traits contribute to the development of OSA. In this study, we present a noninvasive method for measuring four important physiological traits causing OSA: 1) pharyngeal anatomy/collapsibility, 2) ventilatory control system gain (loop gain), 3) the ability of the upper airway to dilate/stiffen in response to an increase in ventilatory drive, and 4) arousal threshold. These variables are measured using a single maneuver in which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is dropped from an optimum to various suboptimum pressures for 3- to 5-min intervals during sleep. Each individuals set of traits is entered into a physiological model of OSA that graphically illustrates the relative importance of each trait in that individual. Results from 14 subjects (10 with OSA) are described. Repeatability measurements from separate nights are also presented for four subjects. The measurements and model illustrate the multifactorial nature of OSA pathogenesis and how, in some individuals, small adjustments of one or another trait (which might be achievable with non-CPAP agents) could potentially treat OSA. This technique could conceivably be used clinically to define a patients physiology and guide therapy based on the traits.
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Motor unit recruitment in human genioglossus muscle in response to hypercapnia.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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single motor unit recordings of the genioglossus (GG) muscle indicate that GG motor units have a variety of discharge patterns, including units that have higher discharge rates during inspiration (inspiratory phasic and inspiratory tonic), or expiration (expiratory phasic and expiratory tonic), or do not modify their rate with respiration (tonic). Previous studies have shown that an increase in GG muscle activity is a consequence of increased activity in inspiratory units. However, there are differences between studies as to whether this increase is primarily due to recruitment of new motor units (motor unit recruitment) or to increased discharge rate of already active units (rate coding). Sleep-wake state studies in humans have suggested the former, while hypercapnia experiments in rats have suggested the latter. In this study, we investigated the effect of hypercapnia on GG motor unit activity in humans during wakefulness.
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Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2010
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Meiotic double-strand break (DSB)-initiated recombination must occur between homologous maternal and paternal chromosomes ("homolog bias"), even though sister chromatids are present. Through physical recombination analyses, we show that sister cohesion, normally mediated by meiotic cohesin Rec8, promotes "sister bias"; that meiosis-specific axis components Red1/Mek1kinase counteract this effect, thereby satisfying an essential precondition for homolog bias; and that other components, probably recombinosome-related, directly ensure homolog partner selection. Later, Rec8 acts positively to ensure maintenance of bias. These complexities mirror opposing dictates for global sister cohesion versus local separation and differentiation of sisters at recombination sites. Our findings support DSB formation within axis-tethered recombinosomes containing both sisters and ensuing programmed sequential release of "first" and "second" DSB ends. First-end release would create a homology-searching "tentacle." Rec8 and Red1/Mek1 also independently license recombinational progression and abundantly localize to different domains. These domains could comprise complementary environments that integrate inputs from DSB repair and mitotic chromosome morphogenesis into the complete meiotic program.
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Recruitment and rate-coding strategies of the human genioglossus muscle.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2010
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Single motor unit (SMU) analysis provides a means to examine the motor control of a muscle. SMUs in the genioglossus show considerable complexity, with several different firing patterns. Two of the primary stimuli that contribute to genioglossal activation are carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and negative pressure, which act through chemoreceptor and mechanoreceptor activation, respectively. We sought to determine how these stimuli affect the behavior of genioglossus SMUs. We quantified genioglossus SMU discharge activity during periods of quiet breathing, elevated CO(2) (facilitation), and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) administration (inhibition). CPAP was applied in 2-cmH(2)O increments until 10 cmH(2)O during hypercapnia. Five hundred ninety-one periods (each ? 3 breaths) of genioglossus SMU data were recorded using wire electrodes(n = 96 units) from 15 awake, supine subjects. Overall hypercapnic stimulation increased the discharge rate of genioglossus units (20.9 ± 1.0 vs. 22.7 ± 0.9 Hz). Inspiratory units were activated ? 13% earlier in the inspiratory cycle, and the units fired for a longer duration (80.6 ± 5.1 vs. 105.3 ± 4.2% inspiratory time; P < 0.05). Compared with baseline, an additional 32% of distinguishable SMUs within the selective electrode recording area were recruited with hypercapnia. CPAP led to progressive SMU inhibition; at ? 6 cmH(2)O, there were similar numbers of SMUs active compared with baseline, with peak frequencies of inspiratory units close to baseline, despite elevated CO(2) levels. At 10 cmH(2)O, the number of units was 36% less than baseline. Genioglossus inspiratory phasic SMUs respond to hypercapnic stimulation with changes in recruitment and rate coding. The SMUs respond to CPAP with derecruitment as a homogeneous population, and inspiratory phasic units show slower discharge rates. Understanding upper airway muscle recruitment/derecruitment may yield therapeutic targets for maintenance of pharyngeal patency.
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Aging and sleep: physiology and pathophysiology.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2010
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Aging effects on sleep are important to consider for the practicing pulmonologist due to the increase in prevalence of major respiratory disorders as well as the normal changes that occur in sleep patterns with aging. Typically, aging is associated with decreases in the amount of slow wave sleep and increases in stage 1 and 2 non-rapid eye movement sleep, often attributed to an increased number of spontaneous arousals that occur in the elderly. Elderly individuals tend to go to sleep earlier in the evening and wake earlier due to a phase advance in their normal circadian sleep cycle. Furthermore the development of sleep-related respiratory disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central sleep apnea or Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR) associated with congestive heart failure (CHF) occur with increasing prevalence in the elderly. The development of such disorders is often of major concern because they are associated with systemic hypertension and cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders such as diabetes, and impaired neurocognition. The present review reflects the current understanding of the normal changes in sleep patterns and sleep needs with advancing age, in addition to the effect that aging has on the predisposition to and consequences of OSA and CSA-CSR associated with CHF.
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Obstructive sleep apnea and aging effects on macrovascular and microcirculatory function.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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Many patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are obese, and whether obesity itself explains the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease in OSA is unknown. We hypothesize that OSA, independent of obesity, contributes to abnormal vascular function.
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The effect of increased genioglossus activity and end-expiratory lung volume on pharyngeal collapse.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2010
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Increasing either genioglossus muscle activity (GG) or end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) improves airway patency but not sufficiently for adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in most patients. The mechanisms by which these variables alter airway collapsibility likely differ, with increased GG causing airway dilation, whereas increased EELV may stiffen the airway walls through caudal traction. We sought to determine whether the airway stabilizing effect of GG activation is enhanced when EELV is increased. To investigate this aim, 15 continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated OSA patients were instrumented with an epiglottic catheter, intramuscular GG-EMG electrodes, magnetometers, and a nasal mask/pneumotachograph. Subjects slept supine in a sealed, head-out plastic chamber in which the extra-thoracic pressure could be lowered (to raise EELV) while on nasal CPAP with a variable deadspace to allow CO(2) stimulation (and GG activation). The pharyngeal critical closing pressure (P(CRIT)) was measured by sudden reduction of CPAP for three to five breaths each minute during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in 4 conditions: a) baseline, b) 500 ml increased EELV, c) 50% increased GG, and d) conditions b and c combined. P(CRIT) was found to be reduced from 2.2 + or - 0.7 cmH(2)O at baseline to -1.0 + or - 0.5 with increased EELV, 0.6 + or - 0.7 with increased GG and -1.6 + or - 0.7 when both variables were raised (P < 0.001). The slope of the P(CRIT) curves remained unchanged in all conditions (P = 0.05). However, the CPAP level at which flow limitation developed was lower in both increased EELV conditions (P = 0.001). These findings indicate that while both increased GG and EELV improve airway collapsibility, the combination of both variables has little additional effect over increasing EELV alone.
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A secondary reflex suppression phase is present in genioglossus but not tensor palatini in response to negative upper airway pressure.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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On the basis of recent reports, the genioglossus (GG) negative-pressure reflex consists initially of excitation followed by a secondary state-dependent suppression phase. The mechanistic origin and functional role of GG suppression is unknown but has been hypothesized to arise from transient inhibition of respiratory active neurons as a protective reflex to prevent aspiration, as observed in other respiratory muscles (e.g., diaphragm) during airway occlusion. Unlike GG, tensor palatini (TP) is a tonic muscle with minimal respiratory phasic activation during relaxed breathing, although both muscles are important in preserving pharyngeal patency. This study aimed to compare GG vs. TP reflex responses to the same negative-pressure stimulus. We hypothesized that reflex suppression would be present in GG, but not TP. Intramuscular GG and TP EMGs were recorded in 12 awake, healthy subjects (6 female). Reflex responses were generated via 250-ms pulses of negative upper airway pressure (approximately -16 cmH2O mask pressure) delivered in early inspiration. GG and TP demonstrated reflex activation in response to negative pressure (peak latency 31+/-4 vs. 31+/-6 ms and peak amplitude 318+/-55 vs. 314+/-26% baseline, respectively). A secondary suppression phase was present in 8 of 12 subjects for GG (nadir latency 54+/-7 ms, nadir amplitude 64+/-6% baseline), but not in any subject for TP. These data provide further support for the presence of excitatory and inhibitory components of GG (phasic muscle) in response to brief upper airway negative-pressure pulses. Conversely, no reflex suppression below baseline was present in TP (tonic muscle) in response to the same stimuli. These differential responses support the hypothesis that GG reflex suppression may be mediated via inhibition of respiratory-related premotor input.
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Discharge patterns of human genioglossus motor units during arousal from sleep.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2010
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Single motor unit recordings of the human genioglossus muscle reveal motor units with a variety of discharge patterns. Integrated multiunit electromyographic recordings of genioglossus have demonstrated an abrupt increase in the muscles activity at arousal from sleep. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of arousal from sleep on the activity of individual motor units as a function of their particular discharge pattern.
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Health effects of media on children and adolescents.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2010
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Youth spend an average of >7 hours/day using media, and the vast majority of them have access to a bedroom television, computer, the Internet, a video-game console, and a cell phone. In this article we review the most recent research on the effects of media on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Studies have shown that media can provide information about safe health practices and can foster social connectedness. However, recent evidence raises concerns about medias effects on aggression, sexual behavior, substance use, disordered eating, and academic difficulties. We provide recommendations for parents, practitioners, the media, and policy makers, among others, for ways to increase the benefits and reduce the harm that media can have for the developing child and for adolescents.
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The influence of end-expiratory lung volume on measurements of pharyngeal collapsibility.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2009
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Changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) affect upper airway stability. The passive pharyngeal critical pressure (Pcrit), a measure of upper airway collapsibility, is determined using airway pressure drops. The EELV change during these drops has not been quantified and may differ between obese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and controls. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated OSA patients and controls were instrumented with an epiglottic catheter, magnetometers (to measure change in EELV), and a nasal mask/pneumotachograph. Subjects slept supine in a head-out plastic chamber in which the extrathoracic pressure could be lowered (to raise EELV) while on nasal CPAP. The magnitude of EELV change during Pcrit measurement (sudden reductions of CPAP for 3-5 breaths each minute) was assessed at baseline and with EELV increased approximately 500 ml. Fifteen OSA patients and 7 controls were studied. EELV change during Pcrit measurement was rapid and pressure dependent, but similar in OSA and control subjects (74 +/- 36 and 59 +/- 24 ml/cmH(2)O respectively, P = 0.33). Increased lung volume (mean +521 ml) decreased Pcrit by a similar amount in OSA and control subjects (-3.1 +/- 1.7 vs. -3.9 +/- 1.9 cmH(2)O, P = 0.31). Important lung volume changes occur during passive Pcrit measurement. However, on average, there is no difference in lung volume change for a given CPAP change between obese OSA subjects and controls. Changes in lung volume alter Pcrit substantially. This work supports a role for lung volume in the pathogenesis of OSA, and lung volume changes should be a consideration during assessment of pharyngeal mechanics.
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Pentobarbital dose-dependently increases respiratory genioglossus muscle activity while impairing diaphragmatic function in anesthetized rats.
Anesthesiology
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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Anesthetics depress both ventilatory and upper airway dilator muscle activity and thus put the upper airway at risk for collapse. However, these effects are agent-dependent and may involve upper airway and diaphragm muscles to varying degrees. The authors assessed the effects of pentobarbital on upper airway dilator and respiratory pump muscle function in rats and compared these results with the effects of normal sleep.
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Estimating the longitudinal association between adolescent sexual behavior and exposure to sexual media content.
J Sex Res
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2009
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The purpose of this study is to estimate the association between adolescent sexual behavior and exposure to sexual media content. A three-wave, longitudinal survey sample (N = 506) of 14- to 16-year-olds at baseline is analyzed using growth curves. Growth trajectories are linear for sexual behavior but not for exposure to sexual media content. The signs of the exposure slopes are not uniformly positive: Hispanic and African American respondents show declines of exposure to sexual media content over the age range investigated here. Although changes in exposure to sex content are highly associated with changes in sexual behavior among Whites, there is little or no association between changes in these variables among Blacks.
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Airway dilator muscle activity and lung volume during stable breathing in obstructive sleep apnea.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2009
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Many patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have spontaneous periods of stable flow limited breathing during sleep without respiratory events or arousals. In addition, OSA is often more severe during REM than NREM and more severe during stage 2 than slow wave sleep (SWS). The physiological mechanisms for these observations are unknown. Thus we aimed to determine whether the activity of two upper airway dilator muscles (genioglossus and tensor palatini) or end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) differ between (1) spontaneously occurring stable and cyclical breathing and (2) different sleep stages in OSA.
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How sources of sexual information relate to adolescents beliefs about sex.
Am J Health Behav
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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To examine how sources of sexual information are associated with adolescents behavioral, normative, and control beliefs about having sexual intercourse using the integrative model of behavior change.
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Mechanisms of apnea.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
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This paper focuses on the underlying mechanisms contributing to sleep-disordered breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder and is characterized by repetitive narrowing or collapse of the pharyngeal airway during sleep. Conversely, central sleep apnea (CSA), highly prevalent in congestive heart failure, is distinguished by a lack of drive to breathe during sleep, resulting in repetitive periods of insufficient ventilation. Both lead to compromised gas exchange, impaired sleep continuity, and catecholamine surges and are associated with major comorbidities including excessive daytime sleepiness and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Although OSA and CSA exist on a spectrum of sleep-disordered breathing, the 2 entities may overlap in their underlying pathophysiologies. This brief review summarizes the etiology and current understanding of OSA and CSA pathophysiology and the role that the cardiovascular system may play in contributing to disease pathology and highlights the likely substantial overlap that exists between the various forms of sleep-disordered breathing.
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The influence of obstructive sleep apnea and gender on genioglossus activity during rapid eye movement sleep.
Chest
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2009
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The mechanisms contributing to worsening of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been minimally studied. Reduced upper-airway muscle tone may be an important contributor. Because respiratory events and the associated blood gas changes can influence genioglossus (GG) activity, we compared GG activity between OSA patients and control subjects during REM sleep using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to minimize the influences of upper-airway resistance (RUA) and blood gas disturbances on GG activity.
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The large conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel interacts with the small GTPase Rab11b.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
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The transduction of sound by the receptor or hair cells of the cochlea leads to the activation of ion channels found in the basal and lateral regions of these cells. Thus, the processing of these transduced signals to the central nervous system is tied to the regulation of baso-lateral ion channels. The large conductance calcium-activated potassium or BK channel was revealed to interact with the small GTPase, Rab11b, which is one of many Rabs found in various endosomal pathways. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the colocalization of these two proteins in receptor cells and auditory neurons. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a heterologous expression system, Rab11b increased or decreased BK expression, depending on the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Rab, respectively. Additional mutation analyses, using a yeast two-hybrid assay, suggested that this GTPase moderately interacts within a region of BK exclusive of the N- or C-terminal tails. These data suggest that this small GTPase regulates BK in a slow recycling process through the endocytic compartment and to the plasmalemma.
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Inspiratory-resistive loading increases the ventilatory response to arousal but does not reduce genioglossus muscle activity on the return to sleep.
J. Appl. Physiol.
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Arousals from sleep are thought to predispose to obstructive sleep apnea by causing hyperventilation and hypocapnia, which reduce airway dilator muscle activity on the return to sleep. However, prior studies of auditory arousals have not resulted in reduced genioglossus muscle activity [GG-electromyogram (EMG)], potentially because airway resistance prior to arousal was low, leading to a small ventilatory response to arousal and minimal hypocapnia. Thus we aimed to increase the ventilatory response to arousal by resistive loading prior to auditory arousal and determine whether reduced GG-EMG occurred on the return to sleep. Eighteen healthy young men and women were recruited. Subjects were instrumented with a nasal mask with a pneumotachograph, an epiglottic pressure catheter, and intramuscular GG-EMG electrodes. Mask CO(2) levels were monitored. Three- to 15-s arousals from sleep were induced with auditory tones after resting breathing (No-Load) or inspiratory-resistive loading (Load; average 8.4 cmH(2)O·l(-1)·s(-1)). Peak minute ventilation following arousal was greater after Load than No-Load (mean ± SE; 8.0 ± 0.6 vs. 7.4 ± 0.6 l/min, respectively). However, the nadir end tidal partial pressure of CO(2) did not differ between Load conditions (43.1 ± 0.6 and 42.8 ± 0.5 mmHg, respectively), and no period of reduced GG activity occurred following the return to sleep (GG-EMG baseline, minimum after Load and No-Load = 2.9 ± 1.2%, 3.1 ± 1.3%, and 3.0 ± 1.3% max, respectively). These findings indicate that the hyperventilation, which occurs following tone-induced arousal, is appropriate for the prevailing level of respiratory drive, because loading did not induce marked hypocapnia or lower GG muscle activity on the return to sleep. Whether similar findings occur following obstructive events in patients remains to be determined.
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Children, adolescents, and the media: health effects.
Pediatr. Clin. North Am.
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The media can be a powerful teacher of children and adolescents and have a profound impact on their health. The media are not the leading cause of any major health problem in the United States, but they do contribute to a variety of pediatric and adolescent health problems. Given that children and teens spend >7 hours a day with media, one would think that adult society would recognize its impact on young peoples attitudes and behaviors. Too little has been done to protect children and adolescents from harmful media effects and to maximize the powerfully prosocial aspects of modern media.
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Discharge patterns of human tensor palatini motor units during sleep onset.
Sleep
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Upper airway muscles such as genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) reduce activity at sleep onset. In GG reduced muscle activity is primarily due to inspiratory modulated motor units becoming silent, suggesting reduced respiratory pattern generator (RPG) output. However, unlike GG, TP shows minimal respiratory modulation and presumably has few inspiratory modulated motor units and minimal input from the RPG. Thus, we investigated the mechanism by which TP reduces activity at sleep onset.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.