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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Early-onset Crohn's disease and autoimmunity associated with a variant in CTLA-4.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2014
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IBD is a group of complex, systemic disorders associated with intestinal inflammation and extraintestinal manifestations. Recent studies revealed Mendelian forms of IBD, which contributed significantly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis and the heritability of IBD.
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CEACAM1 regulates TIM-3-mediated tolerance and exhaustion.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2014
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T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3, also known as HAVCR2) is an activation-induced inhibitory molecule involved in tolerance and shown to induce T-cell exhaustion in chronic viral infection and cancers. Under some conditions, TIM-3 expression has also been shown to be stimulatory. Considering that TIM-3, like cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), is being targeted for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to identify the circumstances under which TIM-3 can inhibit and activate T-cell responses. Here we show that TIM-3 is co-expressed and forms a heterodimer with carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), another well-known molecule expressed on activated T cells and involved in T-cell inhibition. Biochemical, biophysical and X-ray crystallography studies show that the membrane-distal immunoglobulin-variable (IgV)-like amino-terminal domain of each is crucial to these interactions. The presence of CEACAM1 endows TIM-3 with inhibitory function. CEACAM1 facilitates the maturation and cell surface expression of TIM-3 by forming a heterodimeric interaction in cis through the highly related membrane-distal N-terminal domains of each molecule. CEACAM1 and TIM-3 also bind in trans through their N-terminal domains. Both cis and trans interactions between CEACAM1 and TIM-3 determine the tolerance-inducing function of TIM-3. In a mouse adoptive transfer colitis model, CEACAM1-deficient T cells are hyper-inflammatory with reduced cell surface expression of TIM-3 and regulatory cytokines, and this is restored by T-cell-specific CEACAM1 expression. During chronic viral infection and in a tumour environment, CEACAM1 and TIM-3 mark exhausted T cells. Co-blockade of CEACAM1 and TIM-3 leads to enhancement of anti-tumour immune responses with improved elimination of tumours in mouse colorectal cancer models. Thus, CEACAM1 serves as a heterophilic ligand for TIM-3 that is required for its ability to mediate T-cell inhibition, and this interaction has a crucial role in regulating autoimmunity and anti-tumour immunity.
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Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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The protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of immune responses, and its loss causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. We studied a large family in which five individuals presented with a complex, autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and multiple autoimmune clinical features. We identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 1 of CTLA4. Screening of 71 unrelated patients with comparable clinical phenotypes identified five additional families (nine individuals) with previously undescribed splice site and missense mutations in CTLA4. Clinical penetrance was incomplete (eight adults of a total of 19 genetically proven CTLA4 mutation carriers were considered unaffected). However, CTLA-4 protein expression was decreased in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in both patients and carriers with CTLA4 mutations. Whereas Treg cells were generally present at elevated numbers in these individuals, their suppressive function, CTLA-4 ligand binding and transendocytosis of CD80 were impaired. Mutations in CTLA4 were also associated with decreased circulating B cell numbers. Taken together, mutations in CTLA4 resulting in CTLA-4 haploinsufficiency or impaired ligand binding result in disrupted T and B cell homeostasis and a complex immune dysregulation syndrome.
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The age related markers lipofuscin and apoptosis show different genetic architecture by QTL mapping in short-lived Nothobranchius fish.
Aging (Albany NY)
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2014
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Annual fish of the genus Nothobranchius show large variations in lifespan and expression of age-related phenotypes between closely related populations. We studied N. kadleci and its sister species N. furzeri GRZ strain, and found that N.kadleci is longer-lived than the N. furzeri. Lipofuscin and apoptosis measured in the liver increased with age in N. kadleci with different profiles: lipofuscin increased linearly, while apoptosis declined in the oldest animals. More lipofuscin (P<0.001) and apoptosis (P<0.001) was observed in N. furzeri than in N. kadleci at 16w age. Lipofuscin and apoptotic cells were then quantified in hybrids from the mating of N. furzeri to N. kadleci. F?individuals showed heterosis for lipofuscin but additive effects for apoptosis. These two age-related phenotypes were not correlated in F? hybrids. Quantitative trait loci analysis of 287 F? fish using 237 markers identified two QTL accounting for 10% of lipofuscin variance (P<0.001) with overdominance effect. Apoptotic cells revealed three significant- and two suggestive QTL explaining 19% of variance (P<0.001), showing additive and dominance effects, and two interacting loci. Our results show that lipofuscin and apoptosis are markers of different age-dependent biological processes controlled by different genetic mechanisms.
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16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2014
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Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 previously associated with neurodevelopmental disorders also increase risk of RE. Our association analyses revealed a significant excess of the 600 kb genomic duplication at the 16p11.2 locus (chr16: 29.5-30.1 Mb) in 393 unrelated patients with typical (n = 339) and atypical (ARE; n = 54) RE compared with the prevalence in 65 046 European population controls (5/393 cases versus 32/65 046 controls; Fisher's exact test P = 2.83 × 10(-6), odds ratio = 26.2, 95% confidence interval: 7.9-68.2). In contrast, the 16p11.2 duplication was not detected in 1738 European epilepsy patients with either temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 330) and genetic generalized epilepsies (n = 1408), suggesting a selective enrichment of the 16p11.2 duplication in idiopathic focal childhood epilepsies (Fisher's exact test P = 2.1 × 10(-4)). In a subsequent screen among children carrying the 16p11.2 600 kb rearrangement we identified three patients with RE-spectrum epilepsies in 117 duplication carriers (2.6%) but none in 202 carriers of the reciprocal deletion. Our results suggest that the 16p11.2 duplication represents a significant genetic risk factor for typical and atypical RE.
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Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization.
Dan E Arking, Sara L Pulit, Lia Crotti, Pim van der Harst, Patricia B Munroe, Tamara T Koopmann, Nona Sotoodehnia, Elizabeth J Rossin, Michael Morley, Xinchen Wang, Andrew D Johnson, Alicia Lundby, Daniel F Gudbjartsson, Peter A Noseworthy, Mark Eijgelsheim, Yuki Bradford, Kirill V Tarasov, Marcus Dörr, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Annukka M Lahtinen, Ilja M Nolte, Albert Vernon Smith, Joshua C Bis, Aaron Isaacs, Stephen J Newhouse, Daniel S Evans, Wendy S Post, Daryl Waggott, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Andrew A Hicks, Lewin Eisele, David Ellinghaus, Caroline Hayward, Pau Navarro, Sheila Ulivi, Toshiko Tanaka, David J Tester, Stéphanie Chatel, Stefan Gustafsson, Meena Kumari, Richard W Morris, Asa T Naluai, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Alexander Kluttig, Bernhard Strohmer, Andrie G Panayiotou, Maria Torres, Michael Knoflach, Jaroslav A Hubacek, Kamil Slowikowski, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Runjun D Kumar, Tamara B Harris, Lenore J Launer, Alan R Shuldiner, Alvaro Alonso, Joel S Bader, Georg Ehret, Hailiang Huang, W H Linda Kao, James B Strait, Peter W Macfarlane, Morris Brown, Mark J Caulfield, Nilesh J Samani, Florian Kronenberg, Johann Willeit, , J Gustav Smith, Karin H Greiser, Henriette Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Karl Werdan, Massimo Carella, Leopoldo Zelante, Susan R Heckbert, Bruce M Psaty, Jerome I Rotter, Ivana Kolčić, Ozren Polašek, Alan F Wright, Maura Griffin, Mark J Daly, David O Arnar, Hilma Holm, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Joshua C Denny, Dan M Roden, Rebecca L Zuvich, Valur Emilsson, Andrew S Plump, Martin G Larson, Christopher J O'Donnell, Xiaoyan Yin, Marco Bobbo, Adamo P d'Adamo, AnnaMaria Iorio, Gianfranco Sinagra, Angel Carracedo, Steven R Cummings, Michael A Nalls, Antti Jula, Kimmo K Kontula, Annukka Marjamaa, Lasse Oikarinen, Markus Perola, Kimmo Porthan, Raimund Erbel, Per Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Hagen Kälsch, Markus M Nöthen, Marcel den Hoed, Ruth J F Loos, Dag S Thelle, Christian Gieger, Thomas Meitinger, Siegfried Perz, Annette Peters, Hanna Prucha, Moritz F Sinner, Melanie Waldenberger, Rudolf A de Boer, Lude Franke, Pieter A van der Vleuten, Britt Maria Beckmann, Eimo Martens, Abdennasser Bardai, Nynke Hofman, Arthur A M Wilde, Elijah R Behr, Chrysoula Dalageorgou, John R Giudicessi, Argelia Medeiros-Domingo, Julien Barc, Florence Kyndt, Vincent Probst, Alice Ghidoni, Roberto Insolia, Robert M Hamilton, Stephen W Scherer, Jeffrey Brandimarto, Kenneth Margulies, Christine E Moravec, Fabiola Del Greco M, Christian Fuchsberger, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Wai K Lee, Graham C M Watt, Harry Campbell, Sarah H Wild, Nour E El Mokhtari, Norbert Frey, Folkert W Asselbergs, Irene Mateo Leach, Gerjan Navis, Maarten P van den Berg, Dirk J van Veldhuisen, Manolis Kellis, Bouwe P Krijthe, Oscar H Franco, Albert Hofman, Jan A Kors, André G Uitterlinden, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Lyudmyla Kedenko, Claudia Lamina, Ben A Oostra, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Edward G Lakatta, Antonella Mulas, Marco Orrù, David Schlessinger, Manuela Uda, Marcello R P Markus, Uwe Völker, Harold Snieder, Timothy D Spector, Johan Arnlöv, Lars Lind, Johan Sundström, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Mika Kivimäki, Mika Kähönen, Nina Mononen, Olli T Raitakari, Jorma S Viikari, Vera Adamkova, Stefan Kiechl, María Brión, Andrew N Nicolaides, Bernhard Paulweber, Johannes Haerting, Anna F Dominiczak, Fredrik Nyberg, Peter H Whincup, Aroon D Hingorani, Jean-Jacques Schott, Connie R Bezzina, Erik Ingelsson, Luigi Ferrucci, Paolo Gasparini, James F Wilson, Igor Rudan, Andre Franke, Thomas W Mühleisen, Peter P Pramstaller, Terho J Lehtimäki, Andrew D Paterson, Afshin Parsa, Yongmei Liu, Cornelia M van Duijn, David S Siscovick, Vilmundur Gudnason, Yalda Jamshidi, Veikko Salomaa, Stephan B Felix, Serena Sanna, Marylyn D Ritchie, Bruno H Stricker, Kari Stefansson, Laurie A Boyer, Thomas P Cappola, Jesper V Olsen, Kasper Lage, Peter J Schwartz, Stefan Kääb, Aravinda Chakravarti, Michael J Ackerman, Arne Pfeufer, Paul I W de Bakker, Christopher Newton-Cheh.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ?8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD.
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GrabBlur--a framework to facilitate the secure exchange of whole-exome and -genome SNV data using VCF files.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2014
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Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of whole exomes or genomes is increasingly being used in human genetic research and diagnostics. Sharing NGS data with third parties can help physicians and researchers to identify causative or predisposing mutations for a specific sample of interest more efficiently. In many cases, however, the exchange of such data may collide with data privacy regulations. GrabBlur is a newly developed tool to aggregate and share NGS-derived single nucleotide variant (SNV) data in a public database, keeping individual samples unidentifiable. In contrast to other currently existing SNV databases, GrabBlur includes phenotypic information and contact details of the submitter of a given database entry. By means of GrabBlur human geneticists can securely and easily share SNV data from resequencing projects. GrabBlur can ease the interpretation of SNV data by offering basic annotations, genotype frequencies and in particular phenotypic information - given that this information was shared - for the SNV of interest.
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Fine mapping major histocompatibility complex associations in psoriasis and its clinical subtypes.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2014
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Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C(?)06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10(-364)). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C(?)06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C(?)12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQ?1 amino acid position 53; p < 5.0 × 10(-8)), but no apparent risk conferred by MICA. We further evaluated risk of two major clinical subtypes of PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (Pomnibus = 2.2 × 10(-11)), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC.
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Whole genome and exome sequencing of monozygotic twins discordant for Crohn's disease.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease caused by genetic and environmental factors. More than 160 susceptibility loci have been identified for IBD, yet a large part of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Recent studies have demonstrated genetic differences between monozygotic twins, who were long thought to be genetically completely identical.
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Systematic permutation testing in GWAS pathway analyses: identification of genetic networks in dilated cardiomyopathy and ulcerative colitis.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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Genome wide association studies (GWAS) are applied to identify genetic loci, which are associated with complex traits and human diseases. Analogous to the evolution of gene expression analyses, pathway analyses have emerged as important tools to uncover functional networks of genome-wide association data. Usually, pathway analyses combine statistical methods with a priori available biological knowledge. To determine significance thresholds for associated pathways, correction for multiple testing and over-representation permutation testing is applied.
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GLUT-1 expression is largely unrelated to both hypoxia and the Warburg phenotype in squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2014
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Strongly increased uptake of glucose is a hallmark of solid malignant tumors. This phenotype can be triggered by hypoxia-induced gene expression changes or can occur independently of hypoxia as a consequence of malignant transformation itself, and is often referred to as the Warburg effect. The glycolytic phenotype has been associated with malignant progression and resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.
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XIAP variants in male Crohn's disease.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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The genetic basis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to identify rare genetic variants involved in the pathogenesis of IBD.
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Evaluation of genome-wide loci of iron metabolism in hereditary hemochromatosis identifies PCSK7 as a host risk factor of liver cirrhosis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed genetic determinants of iron metabolism, but correlation of these with clinical phenotypes is pending. Homozygosity for HFE C282Y is the predominant genetic risk factor for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and may cause liver cirrhosis. However, this genotype has a low penetrance. Thus, detection of yet unknown genetic markers that identify patients at risk of developing severe liver disease is necessary for better prevention. Genetic loci associated with iron metabolism (TF, TMPRSS6, PCSK7, TFR2 and Chr2p14) in recent GWAS and liver fibrosis (PNPLA3) in recent meta-analysis were analyzed for association with either liver cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis in 148 German HFE C282Y homozygotes. Replication of associations was sought in additional 499 Austrian/Swiss and 112 HFE C282Y homozygotes from Sweden. Only variant rs236918 in the PCSK7 gene (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 7) was associated with cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis (P = 1.02 × 10(-5)) in the German cohort with genotypic odds ratios of 3.56 (95% CI 1.29-9.77) for CG heterozygotes and 5.38 (95% CI 2.39-12.10) for C allele carriers. Association between rs236918 and cirrhosis was confirmed in Austrian/Swiss HFE C282Y homozygotes (P = 0.014; ORallelic = 1.82 (95% CI 1.12-2.95) but not in Swedish patients. Post hoc combined analyses of German/Swiss/Austrian patients with available liver histology (N = 244, P = 0.00014, ORallelic = 2.84) and of males only (N = 431, P = 2.17 × 10(-5), ORallelic = 2.54) were consistent with the premier finding. Association between rs236918 and cirrhosis was not confirmed in alcoholic cirrhotics, suggesting specificity of this genetic risk factor for HH. PCSK7 variant rs236918 is a risk factor for cirrhosis in HH patients homozygous for the HFE C282Y mutation.
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HLA variants related to primary sclerosing cholangitis influence rejection after liver transplantation.
World J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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To investigate influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and killer immunoglobuline-like receptor (KIR) genotypes on risks of acute rejection (AR) after liver transplantation (LTX).
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Mitochondrial DNA variants in obesity.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI) variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s) in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0). For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC) sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI ? 30 kg/m2) and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2). SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger) in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002) located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039). These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048). Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between mothers and their offspring could not be substantiated by the findings of the present study.
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Investigation of complement component C4 copy number variation in human longevity.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Genetic factors have been estimated to account for about 25% of the variation in an adult's life span. The complement component C4 with the isotypes C4A and C4B is an effector protein of the immune system, and differences in the overall C4 copy number or gene size (long C4L; short C4S) may influence the strength of the immune response and disease susceptibilities. Previously, an association between C4B copy number and life span was reported for Hungarians and Icelanders, where the C4B*Q0 genotype, which is defined by C4B gene deficiency, showed a decrease in frequency with age. Additionally, one of the studies indicated that a low C4B copy number might be a genetic trait that is manifested only in the presence of the environmental risk factor "smoking". These observations prompted us to investigate the role of the C4 alleles in our large German longevity sample (? 700 cases; 94-110 years and ? 900 younger controls). No significant differences in the number of C4A, C4B and C4S were detected. Besides, the C4B*Q0 carrier state did not decrease with age, irrespective of smoking as an interacting variable. However, for C4L*Q0 a significantly different carrier frequency was observed in the cases compared with controls (cases: 5.08%; controls: 9.12%; p = 0.003). In a replication sample of 714 German cases (91-108 years) and 890 controls this result was not replicated (p = 0.14) although a similar trend of decreased C4L*Q0 carrier frequency in cases was visible (cases: 7.84%; controls: 10.00%).
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Frequent and sex-biased deletion of SLX4IP by illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2013
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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for ?25% of pediatric malignancies. Of interest, the incidence of ALL is observed ?20% higher in males relative to females. The mechanism behind the phenomenon of sex-specific differences is presently not understood. Employing genome-wide genetic aberration screening in 19 ALL samples, one of the most recurrent lesions identified was monoallelic deletion of the 5 region of SLX4IP. We characterized this deletion by conventional molecular genetic techniques and analyzed its interrelationships with biological and clinical characteristics using specimens and data from 993 pediatric patients enrolled into trial AIEOP-BFM ALL 2000. Deletion of SLX4IP was detected in ?30% of patients. Breakpoints within SLX4IP were defined to recurrent positions and revealed junctions with typical characteristics of illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination. In initial and validation analyses, SLX4IP deletions were significantly associated with male gender and ETV6/RUNX1-rearranged ALL (both overall P < 0.0001). For mechanistic validation, a second recurrent deletion affecting TAL1 and caused by the same molecular mechanism was analyzed in 1149 T-cell ALL patients. Validating a differential role by sex of illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination at the TAL1 locus, 128 out of 1149 T-cell ALL samples bore a deletion and males were significantly more often affected (P = 0.002). The repeatedly detected association of SLX4IP deletion with male sex and the extension of the sex bias to deletion of the TAL1 locus suggest that differential illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination events at specific loci may contribute to the consistent observation of higher incidence rates of childhood ALL in boys compared with girls.
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Common variants in mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.
Afshin Parsa, Christian Fuchsberger, Anna Köttgen, Conall M O'Seaghdha, Cristian Pattaro, Mariza de Andrade, Daniel I Chasman, Alexander Teumer, Karlhans Endlich, Matthias Olden, Ming-Huei Chen, Adrienne Tin, Young J Kim, Daniel Taliun, Man Li, Mary Feitosa, Mathias Gorski, Qiong Yang, Claudia Hundertmark, Meredith C Foster, Nicole Glazer, Aaron Isaacs, Madhumathi Rao, Albert V Smith, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Maksim Struchalin, Toshiko Tanaka, Guo Li, Shih-Jen Hwang, Elizabeth J Atkinson, Kurt Lohman, Marilyn C Cornelis, Asa Johansson, Anke Tönjes, Abbas Dehghan, Vincent Couraki, Elizabeth G Holliday, Rossella Sorice, Zoltan Kutalik, Terho Lehtimäki, Tonu Esko, Harshal Deshmukh, Sheila Ulivi, Audrey Y Chu, Federico Murgia, Stella Trompet, Medea Imboden, Barbara Kollerits, Giorgio Pistis, Tamara B Harris, Lenore J Launer, Thor Aspelund, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Braxton D Mitchell, Eric Boerwinkle, Helena Schmidt, Edith Hofer, Frank Hu, Ayse Demirkan, Ben A Oostra, Stephen T Turner, Jingzhong Ding, Jeanette S Andrews, Barry I Freedman, Franco Giulianini, Wolfgang Koenig, Thomas Illig, Angela Döring, H-Erich Wichmann, Lina Zgaga, Tatijana Zemunik, Mladen Boban, Cosetta Minelli, Heather E Wheeler, Wilmar Igl, Ghazal Zaboli, Sarah H Wild, Alan F Wright, Harry Campbell, David Ellinghaus, Ute Nöthlings, Gunnar Jacobs, Reiner Biffar, Florian Ernst, Georg Homuth, Heyo K Kroemer, Matthias Nauck, Sylvia Stracke, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Peter Kovacs, Michael Stumvoll, Reedik Mägi, Albert Hofman, André G Uitterlinden, Fernando Rivadeneira, Yurii S Aulchenko, Ozren Polašek, Nick Hastie, Veronique Vitart, Catherine Helmer, Jie Jin Wang, Bénédicte Stengel, Daniela Ruggiero, Sven Bergmann, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Tiit Nikopensius, Michael Province, Helen Colhoun, Alex Doney, Antonietta Robino, Bernhard K Krämer, Laura Portas, Ian Ford, Brendan M Buckley, Martin Adam, Gian-Andri Thun, Bernhard Paulweber, Margot Haun, Cinzia Sala, Paul Mitchell, Marina Ciullo, Peter Vollenweider, Olli Raitakari, Andres Metspalu, Colin Palmer, Paolo Gasparini, Mario Pirastu, J Wouter Jukema, Nicole M Probst-Hensch, Florian Kronenberg, Daniela Toniolo, Vilmundur Gudnason, Alan R Shuldiner, Josef Coresh, Reinhold Schmidt, Luigi Ferrucci, Cornelia M van Duijn, Ingrid Borecki, Sharon L R Kardia, Yongmei Liu, Gary C Curhan, Igor Rudan, Ulf Gyllensten, James F Wilson, Andre Franke, Peter P Pramstaller, Rainer Rettig, Inga Prokopenko, Jacqueline Witteman, Caroline Hayward, Paul M Ridker, Murielle Bochud, Iris M Heid, David S Siscovick, Caroline S Fox, W Linda Kao, Carsten A Böger.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2013
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Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.
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Deep resequencing of GWAS loci identifies rare variants in CARD9, IL23R and RNF186 that are associated with ulcerative colitis.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2013
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Genome-wide association studies and follow-up meta-analyses in Crohns disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have recently identified 163 disease-associated loci that meet genome-wide significance for these two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These discoveries have already had a tremendous impact on our understanding of the genetic architecture of these diseases and have directed functional studies that have revealed some of the biological functions that are important to IBD (e.g. autophagy). Nonetheless, these loci can only explain a small proportion of disease variance (~14% in CD and 7.5% in UC), suggesting that not only are additional loci to be found but that the known loci may contain high effect rare risk variants that have gone undetected by GWAS. To test this, we have used a targeted sequencing approach in 200 UC cases and 150 healthy controls (HC), all of French Canadian descent, to study 55 genes in regions associated with UC. We performed follow-up genotyping of 42 rare non-synonymous variants in independent case-control cohorts (totaling 14,435 UC cases and 20,204 HC). Our results confirmed significant association to rare non-synonymous coding variants in both IL23R and CARD9, previously identified from sequencing of CD loci, as well as identified a novel association in RNF186. With the exception of CARD9 (OR = 0.39), the rare non-synonymous variants identified were of moderate effect (OR = 1.49 for RNF186 and OR = 0.79 for IL23R). RNF186 encodes a protein with a RING domain having predicted E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity and two transmembrane domains. Importantly, the disease-coding variant is located in the ubiquitin ligase domain. Finally, our results suggest that rare variants in genes identified by genome-wide association in UC are unlikely to contribute significantly to the overall variance for the disease. Rather, these are expected to help focus functional studies of the corresponding disease loci.
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Replication study of ulcerative colitis risk loci in a Lithuanian-Latvian case-control sample.
Inflamm. Bowel Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2013
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Differences between populations might be reflected in their different genetic risk maps to complex diseases, for example, inflammatory bowel disease. We here investigated the role of known inflammatory bowel disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a subset of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) from the Northeastern European countries Lithuania and Latvia and evaluated possible epistatic interactions between these genetic variants.
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A genome-wide association study of atopic dermatitis identifies loci with overlapping effects on asthma and psoriasis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2013
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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common dermatological disease of childhood. Many children with AD have asthma and AD shares regions of genetic linkage with psoriasis, another chronic inflammatory skin disease. We present here a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of childhood-onset AD in 1563 European cases with known asthma status and 4054 European controls. Using Illumina genotyping followed by imputation, we generated 268 034 consensus genotypes and in excess of 2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for analysis. Association signals were assessed for replication in a second panel of 2286 European cases and 3160 European controls. Four loci achieved genome-wide significance for AD and replicated consistently across all cohorts. These included the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) on chromosome 1, the genomic region proximal to LRRC32 on chromosome 11, the RAD50/IL13 locus on chromosome 5 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6; reflecting action of classical HLA alleles. We observed variation in the contribution towards co-morbid asthma for these regions of association. We further explored the genetic relationship between AD, asthma and psoriasis by examining previously identified susceptibility SNPs for these diseases. We found considerable overlap between AD and psoriasis together with variable coincidence between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. Our results indicate that the pathogenesis of AD incorporates immune and epidermal barrier defects with combinations of specific and overlapping effects at individual loci.
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Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS). The genetic basis is largely unknown. We detected new heterozygous mutations in GRIN2A in 27 of 359 affected individuals from 2 independent cohorts with IFE (7.5%; P = 4.83 × 10(-18), Fishers exact test). Mutations occurred significantly more frequently in the more severe phenotypes, with mutation detection rates ranging from 12/245 (4.9%) in individuals with BECTS to 9/51 (17.6%) in individuals with CSWS (P = 0.009, Cochran-Armitage test for trend). In addition, exon-disrupting microdeletions were found in 3 of 286 individuals (1.0%; P = 0.004, Fishers exact test). These results establish alterations of the gene encoding the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit as a major genetic risk factor for IFE.
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Autophagy receptor CALCOCO2/NDP52 takes center stage in Crohn disease.
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
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To advance understanding of the complex genetics of Crohn disease (CD) we sequenced 42 whole exomes of patients with CD and five healthy control individuals, resulting in identification of a missense mutation in the autophagy receptor calcium binding and coiled-coil domain 2 (CALCOCO2/NDP52) gene. Protein domain modeling and functional studies highlight the potential role of this mutation in controlling NFKB signaling downstream of toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways. We summarize our recent findings and discuss the role of autophagy as a major modulator of proinflammatory signaling in the context of chronic inflammation.
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Paleoproteomic study of the Icemans brain tissue.
Cell. Mol. Life Sci.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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The Tyrolean Iceman, a Copper-age ice mummy, is one of the best-studied human individuals. While the genome of the Iceman has largely been decoded, tissue-specific proteomes have not yet been investigated. We studied the proteome of two distinct brain samples using gel-based and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies together with a multiple-databases and -search algorithms-driven data-analysis approach. Thereby, we identified a total of 502 different proteins. Of these, 41 proteins are known to be highly abundant in brain tissue and 9 are even specifically expressed in the brain. Furthermore, we found 10 proteins related to blood and coagulation. An enrichment analysis revealed a significant accumulation of proteins related to stress response and wound healing. Together with atomic force microscope scans, indicating clustered blood cells, our data reopens former discussions about a possible injury of the Icemans head near the site where the tissue samples have been extracted.
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High-density genotyping study identifies four new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2013
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Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a strong heritable component. Pathogenetic models consider keratinocyte differentiation defects and immune alterations as scaffolds, and recent data indicate a role for autoreactivity in at least a subgroup of patients. FLG (encoding filaggrin) has been identified as a major locus causing skin barrier deficiency. To better define risk variants and identify additional susceptibility loci, we densely genotyped 2,425 German individuals with atopic dermatitis (cases) and 5,449 controls using the Immunochip array followed by replication in 7,196 cases and 15,480 controls from Germany, Ireland, Japan and China. We identified four new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis and replicated previous associations. This brings the number of atopic dermatitis risk loci reported in individuals of European ancestry to 11. We estimate that these susceptibility loci together account for 14.4% of the heritability for atopic dermatitis.
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Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis.
, Ashley H Beecham, Nikolaos A Patsopoulos, Dionysia K Xifara, Mary F Davis, Anu Kemppinen, Chris Cotsapas, Tejas S Shah, Chris Spencer, David Booth, An Goris, Annette Oturai, Janna Saarela, Bertrand Fontaine, Bernhard Hemmer, Claes Martin, Frauke Zipp, Sandra D'Alfonso, Filippo Martinelli-Boneschi, Bruce Taylor, Hanne F Harbo, Ingrid Kockum, Jan Hillert, Tomas Olsson, Maria Ban, Jorge R Oksenberg, Rogier Hintzen, Lisa F Barcellos, Cristina Agliardi, Lars Alfredsson, Mehdi Alizadeh, Carl Anderson, Robert Andrews, Helle Bach Søndergaard, Amie Baker, Gavin Band, Sergio E Baranzini, Nadia Barizzone, Jeffrey Barrett, Celine Bellenguez, Laura Bergamaschi, Luisa Bernardinelli, Achim Berthele, Viola Biberacher, Thomas M C Binder, Hannah Blackburn, Izaura L Bomfim, Paola Brambilla, Simon Broadley, Bruno Brochet, Lou Brundin, Dorothea Buck, Helmut Butzkueven, Stacy J Caillier, William Camu, Wassila Carpentier, Paola Cavalla, Elisabeth G Celius, Irène Coman, Giancarlo Comi, Lucia Corrado, Leentje Cosemans, Isabelle Cournu-Rebeix, Bruce A C Cree, Daniele Cusi, Vincent Damotte, Gilles Defer, Silvia R Delgado, Panos Deloukas, Alessia di Sapio, Alexander T Dilthey, Peter Donnelly, Bénédicte Dubois, Martin Duddy, Sarah Edkins, Irina Elovaara, Federica Esposito, Nikos Evangelou, Barnaby Fiddes, Judith Field, Andre Franke, Colin Freeman, Irene Y Frohlich, Daniela Galimberti, Christian Gieger, Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, Christiane Graetz, Andrew Graham, Verena Grummel, Clara Guaschino, Athena Hadjixenofontos, Hakon Hakonarson, Christopher Halfpenny, Gillian Hall, Per Hall, Anders Hamsten, James Harley, Timothy Harrower, Clive Hawkins, Garrett Hellenthal, Charles Hillier, Jeremy Hobart, Muni Hoshi, Sarah E Hunt, Maja Jagodic, Ilijas Jelcic, Angela Jochim, Brian Kendall, Allan Kermode, Trevor Kilpatrick, Keijo Koivisto, Ioanna Konidari, Thomas Korn, Helena Kronsbein, Cordelia Langford, Malin Larsson, Mark Lathrop, Christine Lebrun-Frenay, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Michelle H Lee, Maurizio A Leone, Virpi Leppä, Giuseppe Liberatore, Benedicte A Lie, Christina M Lill, Magdalena Lindén, Jenny Link, Felix Luessi, Jan Lycke, Fabio Macciardi, Satu Mannisto, Clara P Manrique, Roland Martin, Vittorio Martinelli, Deborah Mason, Gordon Mazibrada, Cristin McCabe, Inger-Lise Mero, Julia Mescheriakova, Loukas Moutsianas, Kjell-Morten Myhr, Guy Nagels, Richard Nicholas, Petra Nilsson, Fredrik Piehl, Matti Pirinen, Siân E Price, Hong Quach, Mauri Reunanen, Wim Robberecht, Neil P Robertson, Mariaemma Rodegher, David Rog, Marco Salvetti, Nathalie C Schnetz-Boutaud, Finn Sellebjerg, Rebecca C Selter, Catherine Schaefer, Sandip Shaunak, Ling Shen, Simon Shields, Volker Siffrin, Mark Slee, Per Soelberg Sorensen, Melissa Sorosina, Mireia Sospedra, Anne Spurkland, Amy Strange, Emilie Sundqvist, Vincent Thijs, John Thorpe, Anna Ticca, Pentti Tienari, Cornelia van Duijn, Elizabeth M Visser, Steve Vucic, Helga Westerlind, James S Wiley, Alastair Wilkins, James F Wilson, Juliane Winkelmann, John Zajicek, Eva Zindler, Jonathan L Haines, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Adrian J Ivinson, Graeme Stewart, David Hafler, Stephen L Hauser, Alastair Compston, Gil McVean, Philip De Jager, Stephen J Sawcer, Jacob L McCauley.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P < 1.0 × 10(-4)). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), 3 of which we found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants at 103 discrete loci outside of the major histocompatibility complex. With high-resolution Bayesian fine mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalog of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals.
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Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies nine new risk loci for primary sclerosing cholangitis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
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Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a severe liver disease of unknown etiology leading to fibrotic destruction of the bile ducts and ultimately to the need for liver transplantation. We compared 3,789 PSC cases of European ancestry to 25,079 population controls across 130,422 SNPs genotyped using the Immunochip. We identified 12 genome-wide significant associations outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex, 9 of which were new, increasing the number of known PSC risk loci to 16. Despite comorbidity with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 72% of the cases, 6 of the 12 loci showed significantly stronger association with PSC than with IBD, suggesting overlapping yet distinct genetic architectures for these two diseases. We incorporated association statistics from 7 diseases clinically occurring with PSC in the analysis and found suggestive evidence for 33 additional pleiotropic PSC risk loci. Together with network analyses, these findings add to the genetic risk map of PSC and expand on the relationship between PSC and other immune-mediated diseases.
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Association between variants of PRDM1 and NDP52 and Crohns disease, based on exome sequencing and functional studies.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 140 Crohns disease (CD) susceptibility loci. For most loci, the variants that cause disease are not known and the genes affected by these variants have not been identified. We aimed to identify variants that cause CD through detailed sequencing, genetic association, expression, and functional studies.
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Iterative phenotyping of 15q11.2, 15q13.3 and 16p13.11 microdeletion carriers in pediatric epilepsies.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Microdeletions at 15q11.2, 15q13.3 and 16p13.11 are known genetic risk factors for idiopathic generalized epilepsies and other neurodevelopmental disorders. The full phenotypic range of this microdeletion triad in pediatric epilepsies is unknown. We attempted to describe associated phenotypes in a cohort of pediatric epilepsy patients. We screened 570 patients with pediatric epilepsies including idiopathic generalized epilepsies, focal epilepsies and fever-associated epilepsy syndromes for microdeletions at 15q11.2, 15q13.3 and 16p13.11 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Identified microdeletions were confirmed using array comparative hybridization. Ten microdeletions in 15q11.2 (n=3), 15q13.3 (n=3) and 16p13.11 (n=4) were identified (1.8%). 9/10 microdeletions were identified in patients with IGE (6/101, 6.0%) or patients with generalized EEG patterns without seizures (3/122, 2.5%). 6/10 microdeletion carriers had various degrees of ID; the frequency of microdeletions in patients with epilepsy and ID was higher (4.6%) compared to patients with normal intellect (0.9%). Iterative phenotyping revealed a wide range of generalized epilepsy phenotypes. In our pediatric cohort, recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2, 15q13.3 and 16p13.11 are mainly associated with phenotypes related to idiopathic generalized epilepsies or related EEG patterns. In contrast to previous reports, these recurrent microdeletions are virtually absent in focal epilepsies, FS, FS+ and GEFS+. Microdeletion carriers have a five-fold risk to present with various degrees of ID compared to patients without these risk factors. This microdeletion triad might help delineate a novel spectrum of epilepsy phenotypes classifiable through clinical, electrographic and genetic data.
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Deciphering the 8q24.21 association for glioma.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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We have previously identified tagSNPs at 8q24.21 influencing glioma risk. We have sought to fine-map the location of the functional basis of this association using data from four genome-wide association studies, comprising a total of 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls. To improve marker density across the 700 kb region, we imputed genotypes using 1000 Genomes Project data and high-coverage sequencing data generated on 253 individuals. Analysis revealed an imputed low-frequency SNP rs55705857 (P = 2.24 × 10(-38)) which was sufficient to fully capture the 8q24.21 association. Analysis by glioma subtype showed the association with rs55705857 confined to non-glioblastoma multiforme (non-GBM) tumours (P = 1.07 × 10(-67)). Validation of the non-GBM association was shown in three additional datasets (625 non-GBM cases, 2412 controls; P = 1.41 × 10(-28)). In the pooled analysis, the odds ratio for low-grade glioma associated with rs55705857 was 4.3 (P = 2.31 × 10(-94)). rs55705857 maps to a highly evolutionarily conserved sequence within the long non-coding RNA CCDC26 raising the possibility of direct functionality. These data provide additional insights into the aetiological basis of glioma development.
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A genome-wide analysis of populations from European Russia reveals a new pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Several studies examined the fine-scale structure of human genetic variation in Europe. However, the European sets analyzed represent mainly northern, western, central, and southern Europe. Here, we report an analysis of approximately 166,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in populations from eastern (northeastern) Europe: four Russian populations from European Russia, and three populations from the northernmost Finno-Ugric ethnicities (Veps and two contrast groups of Komi people). These were compared with several reference European samples, including Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Poles, Czechs, Germans, and Italians. The results obtained demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of populations living in the region studied. Russians from the central part of European Russia (Tver, Murom, and Kursk) exhibited similarities with populations from central-eastern Europe, and were distant from Russian sample from the northern Russia (Mezen district, Archangelsk region). Komi samples, especially Izhemski Komi, were significantly different from all other populations studied. These can be considered as a second pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe (in addition to the pole, occupied by Finns), as they had a distinct ancestry component. Russians from Mezen and the Finnic-speaking Veps were positioned between the two poles, but differed from each other in the proportions of Komi and Finnic ancestries. In general, our data provides a more complete genetic map of Europe accounting for the diversity in its most eastern (northeastern) populations.
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Rare exonic deletions of the RBFOX1 gene increase risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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Structural variations disrupting the gene encoding the neuron-specific splicing regulator RBFOX1 have been reported in three patients exhibiting epilepsy in comorbidity with other neuropsychiatric disorders. Consistently, the Rbfox1 knockout mouse model showed an increased susceptibility of seizures. The present candidate gene study tested whether exon-disrupting deletions of RBFOX1 increase the risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs), representing the largest group of genetically determined epilepsies.
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Genetic and functional identification of the likely causative variant for cholesterol gallstone disease at the ABCG5/8 lithogenic locus.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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The sterolin locus (ABCG5/ABCG8) confers susceptibility for cholesterol gallstone disease in humans. Both the responsible variant and the molecular mechanism causing an increased incidence of gallstones in these patients have as yet not been identified. Genetic mapping utilized patient samples from Germany (2,808 cases, 2,089 controls), Chile (680 cases, 442 controls), Denmark (366 cases, 766 controls), India (247 cases, 224 controls), and China (280 cases, 244 controls). Analysis of allelic imbalance in complementary DNA (cDNA) samples from human liver (n = 22) was performed using pyrosequencing. Transiently transfected HEK293 cells were used for [(3) H]-cholesterol export assays, analysis of protein expression, and localization of allelic constructs. Through fine mapping in German and Chilean samples, an ?250 kB disease-associated interval could be defined for this locus. Lack of allelic imbalance or allelic splicing of the ABCG5 and ABCG8 transcripts in human liver limited the search to coding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Subsequent mutation detection and genotyping yielded two disease-associated variants: ABCG5-R50C (P = 4.94 × 10(-9) ) and ABCG8-D19H (P = 1.74 × 10(-10) ) in high pairwise linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.95). [(3) H]-cholesterol export assays of allelic constructs harboring these genetic candidate variants demonstrated increased transport activity (3.2-fold, P = 0.003) only for the ABCG8-19H variant, which was also superior in nested logistic regression models in German (P = 0.018), Chilean (P = 0.030), and Chinese (P = 0.040) patient samples. Conclusion: This variant thus provides a molecular basis for biliary cholesterol hypersecretion as the mechanism for cholesterol gallstone formation, thereby drawing a link between "postgenomic" and "pregenomic" pathophysiological knowledge about this common complex disorder. (HEPATOLOGY 2012).
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A functional IL-6 receptor (IL6R) variant is a risk factor for persistent atopic dermatitis.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease. Previous studies have revealed shared genetic determinants among different inflammatory disorders, suggesting that markers associated with immune-related traits might also play a role in AD.
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Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis identifies risk loci at GPR35 and TCF4.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Approximately 60%-80% of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) have concurrent ulcerative colitis (UC). Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in PSC have detected a number of susceptibility loci that also show associations in UC and other immune-mediated diseases. We aimed to systematically compare genetic associations in PSC with genotype data in UC patients with the aim of detecting new susceptibility loci for PSC. We performed combined analyses of GWAS for PSC and UC comprising 392 PSC cases, 987 UC cases, and 2,977 controls and followed up top association signals in an additional 1,012 PSC cases, 4,444 UC cases, and 11,659 controls. We discovered novel genome-wide significant associations with PSC at 2q37 [rs3749171 at G-protein-coupled receptor 35 (GPR35); P = 3.0 × 10(-9) in the overall study population, combined odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.39 (1.24-1.55)] and at 18q21 [rs1452787 at transcription factor 4 (TCF4); P = 2.61 × 10(-8) , OR (95% CI) = 0.75 (0.68-0.83)]. In addition, several suggestive PSC associations were detected. The GPR35 rs3749171 is a missense single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in a shift from threonine to methionine. Structural modeling showed that rs3749171 is located in the third transmembrane helix of GPR35 and could possibly alter efficiency of signaling through the GPR35 receptor. Conclusion: By refining the analysis of a PSC GWAS by parallel assessments in a UC GWAS, we were able to detect two novel risk loci at genome-wide significance levels. GPR35 shows associations in both UC and PSC, whereas TCF4 represents a PSC risk locus not associated with UC. Both loci may represent previously unexplored aspects of PSC pathogenesis.
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Exon-disrupting deletions of NRXN1 in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2013
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Neurexins are neuronal adhesion molecules located in the presynaptic terminal, where they interact with postsynaptic neuroligins to form a transsynaptic complex required for efficient neurotransmission in the brain. Recently, deletions and point mutations of the neurexin 1 (NRXN1) gene have been associated with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. This study aimed to investigate if NRXN1 deletions also increase the risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs).
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Intestinal DMBT1 Expression Is Modulated by Crohns Disease-Associated IL23R Variants and by a DMBT1 Variant Which Influences Binding of the Transcription Factors CREB1 and ATF-2.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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DMBT is an antibacterial pattern recognition and scavenger receptor. In this study, we analyzed the role of DMBT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility and examined their functional impact on transcription factor binding and downstream gene expression.
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Genome-wide meta-analysis of psoriatic arthritis identifies susceptibility locus at REL.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2011
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Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal disease affecting up to 30% of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) cases and approximately 0.25 to 1% of the general population. To identify common susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of three imputed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on psoriasis, stratified for PsA. A total of 1,160,703 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in the discovery set consisting of 535 PsA cases and 3,432 controls from Germany, the United States, and Canada. We followed up two SNPs in 1,931 PsA cases and 6,785 controls comprising six independent replication panels from Germany, Estonia, the United States, and Canada. In the combined analysis, a genome-wide significant association was detected at 2p16 near the REL locus encoding c-Rel (rs13017599, P=1.18 × 10(-8), odds ratio (OR)=1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.18-1.35). The rs13017599 polymorphism is known to associate with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and another SNP near REL (rs702873) was recently implicated in PsV susceptibility. However, conditional analysis indicated that rs13017599, rather than rs702873, accounts for the PsA association at REL. We hypothesize that c-Rel, as a member of the Rel/NF-?B family, is associated with PsA in the context of disease pathways that involve other identified PsA and PsV susceptibility genes including TNIP1, TNFAIP3, and NF?BIA.
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B-SOLANA: an approach for the analysis of two-base encoding bisulfite sequencing data.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2011
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Bisulfite sequencing, a combination of bisulfite treatment and high-throughput sequencing, has proved to be a valuable method for measuring DNA methylation at single base resolution. Here, we present B-SOLANA, an approach for the analysis of two-base encoding (colorspace) bisulfite sequencing data on the SOLiD platform of Life Technologies. It includes the alignment of bisulfite sequences and the determination of methylation levels in CpG as well as non-CpG sequence contexts. B-SOLANA enables a fast and accurate analysis of large raw sequence datasets.
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Targeted enrichment of genomic DNA regions for next-generation sequencing.
Brief Funct Genomics
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2011
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In this review, we discuss the latest targeted enrichment methods and aspects of their utilization along with second-generation sequencing for complex genome analysis. In doing so, we provide an overview of issues involved in detecting genetic variation, for which targeted enrichment has become a powerful tool. We explain how targeted enrichment for next-generation sequencing has made great progress in terms of methodology, ease of use and applicability, but emphasize the remaining challenges such as the lack of even coverage across targeted regions. Costs are also considered versus the alternative of whole-genome sequencing which is becoming ever more affordable. We conclude that targeted enrichment is likely to be the most economical option for many years to come in a range of settings.
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Colonic mucosa-associated microbiota is influenced by an interaction of Crohn disease and FUT2 (Secretor) genotype.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2011
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The FUT2 (Secretor) gene is responsible for the presence of ABO histo-blood group antigens on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in bodily secretions. Individuals lacking a functional copy of FUT2 are known as "nonsecretors" and display an array of differences in susceptibility to infection and disease, including Crohn disease. To determine whether variation in resident microbial communities with respect to FUT2 genotype is a potential factor contributing to susceptibility, we performed 454-based community profiling of the intestinal microbiota in a panel of healthy subjects and Crohn disease patients and determined their genotype for the primary nonsecretor allele in Caucasian populations, W143X (G428A). Consistent with previous studies, we observe significant deviations in the microbial communities of individuals with Crohn disease. Furthermore, the FUT2 genotype explains substantial differences in community composition, diversity, and structure, and we identified several bacterial species displaying disease-by-genotype associations. These findings indicate that alterations in resident microbial communities may in part explain the variety of host susceptibilities surrounding nonsecretor status and that FUT2 is an important genetic factor influencing host-microbial diversity.
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New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation.
Christian Gieger, Aparna Radhakrishnan, Ana Cvejic, Weihong Tang, Eleonora Porcu, Giorgio Pistis, Jovana Serbanovic-Canic, Ulrich Elling, Alison H Goodall, Yann Labrune, Lorna M Lopez, Reedik Mägi, Stuart Meacham, Yukinori Okada, Nicola Pirastu, Rossella Sorice, Alexander Teumer, Katrin Voss, Weihua Zhang, Ramiro Ramirez-Solis, Joshua C Bis, David Ellinghaus, Martin Gögele, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Claudia Langenberg, Peter Kovacs, Paul F O'Reilly, So-Youn Shin, Tonu Esko, Jaana Hartiala, Stavroula Kanoni, Federico Murgia, Afshin Parsa, Jonathan Stephens, Pim van der Harst, C Ellen van der Schoot, Hooman Allayee, Antony Attwood, Beverley Balkau, François Bastardot, Saonli Basu, Sebastian E Baumeister, Ginevra Biino, Lorenzo Bomba, Amélie Bonnefond, Francois Cambien, John C Chambers, Francesco Cucca, Pio D'Adamo, Gail Davies, Rudolf A de Boer, Eco J C de Geus, Angela Döring, Paul Elliott, Jeanette Erdmann, David M Evans, Mario Falchi, Wei Feng, Aaron R Folsom, Ian H Frazer, Quince D Gibson, Nicole L Glazer, Chris Hammond, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Susan R Heckbert, Christian Hengstenberg, Micha Hersch, Thomas Illig, Ruth J F Loos, Jennifer Jolley, Kay Tee Khaw, Brigitte Kühnel, Marie-Christine Kyrtsonis, Vasiliki Lagou, Heather Lloyd-Jones, Thomas Lumley, Massimo Mangino, Andrea Maschio, Irene Mateo Leach, Barbara McKnight, Yasin Memari, Braxton D Mitchell, Grant W Montgomery, Yusuke Nakamura, Matthias Nauck, Gerjan Navis, Ute Nöthlings, Ilja M Nolte, David J Porteous, Anneli Pouta, Peter P Pramstaller, Janne Pullat, Susan M Ring, Jerome I Rotter, Daniela Ruggiero, Aimo Ruokonen, Cinzia Sala, Nilesh J Samani, Jennifer Sambrook, David Schlessinger, Stefan Schreiber, Heribert Schunkert, James Scott, Nicholas L Smith, Harold Snieder, John M Starr, Michael Stumvoll, Atsushi Takahashi, W H Wilson Tang, Kent Taylor, Albert Tenesa, Swee Lay Thein, Anke Tönjes, Manuela Uda, Sheila Ulivi, Dirk J van Veldhuisen, Peter M Visscher, Uwe Völker, H-Erich Wichmann, Kerri L Wiggins, Gonneke Willemsen, Tsun-Po Yang, Jing Hua Zhao, Paavo Zitting, John R Bradley, George V Dedoussis, Paolo Gasparini, Stanley L Hazen, Andres Metspalu, Mario Pirastu, Alan R Shuldiner, L Joost van Pelt, Jaap-Jan Zwaginga, Dorret I Boomsma, Ian J Deary, Andre Franke, Philippe Froguel, Santhi K Ganesh, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Nicholas G Martin, Christa Meisinger, Bruce M Psaty, Timothy D Spector, Nicholas J Wareham, Jan-Willem N Akkerman, Marina Ciullo, Panos Deloukas, Andreas Greinacher, Steve Jupe, Naoyuki Kamatani, Jyoti Khadake, Jaspal S Kooner, Josef Penninger, Inga Prokopenko, Derek Stemple, Daniela Toniolo, Lorenz Wernisch, Serena Sanna, Andrew A Hicks, Augusto Rendon, Manuel A Ferreira, Willem H Ouwehand, Nicole Soranzo.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function.
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Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2011
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Differences in the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease between different European countries and ethnicities have previously been reported. In the present study, we wanted to assess the role of 11 newly identified UC risk variants, derived from a recent European UC genome wide association study (GWAS) (Franke et al., 2010), for 1) association with UC in the Nordic countries, 2) for population heterogeneity between the Nordic countries and the rest of Europe, and, 3) eventually, to drive some of the previous findings towards overall genome-wide significance.
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Comprehensive analysis of candidate genes for photosensitivity using a complementary bioinformatic and experimental approach.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is a highly heritable electroencephalographic trait characterized by an increased sensitivity to photic stimulation. It may serve as an endophenotype for idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Family linkage studies identified susceptibility loci for PPR on chromosomes 5q35.3, 8q21.13, and 16p13.3. This study aimed to identify key candidate genes within these loci. We used bioinformatics tools for gene prioritization integrating information on biologic function, sequence data, gene expression, and others. The prime candidate gene from this analysis was sequenced in 48 photopositive probands. Presumed functional implications of identified polymorphisms were investigated using bioinformatics methods. The glutamate receptor subunit gene GRIN2A was identified as a prime candidate gene. Sequence analysis revealed various new polymorphisms. None of the identified variants was predicted to be functionally relevant. We objectified the selection of candidate genes for PPR without an a priori hypothesis. Particularly among the various ion channel genes in the linkage regions, GRIN2A was identified as the prime candidate gene. GRIN2A mutations have recently been identified in various epilepsies. Even though our mutation analysis failed to demonstrate direct involvement of GRIN2A in photosensitivity, in silico gene prioritization may provide a useful tool for the identification of candidate genes within large genomic regions.
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Rare copy number variation discovery and cross-disorder comparisons identify risk genes for ADHD.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2011
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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and persistent condition characterized by developmentally atypical and impairing inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. We identified de novo and rare copy number variations (CNVs) in 248 unrelated ADHD patients using million-feature genotyping arrays. We found de novo CNVs in 3 of 173 (1.7%) ADHD patients for whom we had DNA from both parents. These CNVs affected brain-expressed genes: DCLK2, SORCS1, SORCS3, and MACROD2. We also detected rare inherited CNVs in 19 of 248 (7.7%) ADHD probands, which were absent in 2357 controls and which either overlapped previously implicated ADHD loci (for example, DRD5 and 15q13 microduplication) or identified new candidate susceptibility genes (ASTN2, CPLX2, ZBBX, and PTPRN2). Among these de novo and rare inherited CNVs, there were also examples of genes (ASTN2, GABRG1, and CNTN5) previously implicated by rare CNVs in other neurodevelopmental conditions including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To further explore the overlap of risks in ADHD and ASD, we used the same microarrays to test for rare CNVs in an independent, newly collected cohort of 349 unrelated individuals with a primary diagnosis of ASD. Deletions of the neuronal ASTN2 and the ASTN2-intronic TRIM32 genes yielded the strongest association with ADHD and ASD, but numerous other shared candidate genes (such as CHCHD3, MACROD2, and the 16p11.2 region) were also revealed. Our results provide support for a role for rare CNVs in ADHD risk and reinforce evidence for the existence of common underlying susceptibility genes for ADHD, ASD, and other neuropsychiatric disorders.
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Genetics in primary sclerosing cholangitis.
Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2011
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Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic and severe inflammatory disease leading to fibrotic bile duct destruction and in most cases liver cirrhosis. As in other complex genetic diseases, the sibling risk of PSC is more than ten times that of the general population. Recent genome-wide association studies have consistently identified several genetic susceptibility loci. The overlap of these loci with susceptibility loci in other chronic inflammatory diseases is considerable, and offers intriguing opportunities for transfer of pathogenetic knowledge and potentially treatment options. In the present article we summarise the present knowledge on PSC genetics with a particular emphasis on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We discuss the clinical relevance of the risk loci and elaborate on the insight that may be obtained from associated inflammatory conditions and existing murine knock-out models.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.
Lavinia Paternoster, Marie Standl, Chih-Mei Chen, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Klaus Bønnelykke, Liesbeth Duijts, Manuel A Ferreira, Alexessander Couto Alves, Jacob P Thyssen, Eva Albrecht, Hansjörg Baurecht, Bjarke Feenstra, Patrick M A Sleiman, Pirro Hysi, Nicole M Warrington, Ivan Curjuric, Ronny Myhre, John A Curtin, Maria M Groen-Blokhuis, Marjan Kerkhof, Annika Sääf, Andre Franke, David Ellinghaus, Regina Fölster-Holst, Emmanouil Dermitzakis, Stephen B Montgomery, Holger Prokisch, Katharina Heim, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Anneli Pouta, Juha Pekkanen, Alexandra I F Blakemore, Jessica L Buxton, Marika Kaakinen, David L Duffy, Pamela A Madden, Andrew C Heath, Grant W Montgomery, Philip J Thompson, Melanie C Matheson, Peter Le Souef, , Beate St Pourcain, George Davey Smith, John Henderson, John P Kemp, Nicholas J Timpson, Panos Deloukas, Susan M Ring, H-Erich Wichmann, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Natalija Novak, Norman Klopp, Elke Rodríguez, Wendy McArdle, Allan Linneberg, Torkil Menné, Ellen A Nohr, Albert Hofman, André G Uitterlinden, Cornelia M van Duijn, Fernando Rivadeneira, Johan C de Jongste, Ralf J P van der Valk, Matthias Wjst, Rain Jõgi, Frank Geller, Heather A Boyd, Jeffrey C Murray, Cecilia Kim, Frank Mentch, Michael March, Massimo Mangino, Tim D Spector, Veronique Bataille, Craig E Pennell, Patrick G Holt, Peter Sly, Carla M T Tiesler, Elisabeth Thiering, Thomas Illig, Medea Imboden, Wenche Nystad, Angela Simpson, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Dirkje Postma, Gerard H Koppelman, Henriëtte A Smit, Cilla Söderhäll, Bo Chawes, Eskil Kreiner-Møller, Hans Bisgaard, Erik Melén, Dorret I Boomsma, Adnan Custovic, Bo Jacobsson, Nicole M Probst-Hensch, Lyle J Palmer, Daniel Glass, Hakon Hakonarson, Mads Melbye, Deborah L Jarvis, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Christian Gieger, David P Strachan, Nicholas G Martin, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Joachim Heinrich, David M Evans, Stephan Weidinger.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 population-based cohorts and then examined the ten most strongly associated new susceptibility loci in an additional 5,419 affected individuals and 19,833 controls from 14 studies. Three SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the discovery and replication cohorts combined, including rs479844 upstream of OVOL1 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.88, P = 1.1 × 10(-13)) and rs2164983 near ACTL9 (OR = 1.16, P = 7.1 × 10(-9)), both of which are near genes that have been implicated in epidermal proliferation and differentiation, as well as rs2897442 in KIF3A within the cytokine cluster at 5q31.1 (OR = 1.11, P = 3.8 × 10(-8)). We also replicated association with the FLG locus and with two recently identified association signals at 11q13.5 (rs7927894; P = 0.008) and 20q13.33 (rs6010620; P = 0.002). Our results underline the importance of both epidermal barrier function and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis.
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Wnt signaling and Dupuytrens disease.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2011
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Dupuytrens disease is a benign fibromatosis of the hands and fingers that leads to flexion contractures. We hypothesized that multiple genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility to this disease and sought to identify susceptibility genes to better understand its pathogenesis.
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A genome-wide association study confirms APOE as the major gene influencing survival in long-lived individuals.
Mech. Ageing Dev.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2011
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We conducted a case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) of human longevity, comparing 664,472 autosomal SNPs in 763 long-lived individuals (LLI; mean age: 99.7 years) and 1085 controls (mean age: 60.2 years) from Germany. Only one association, namely that of SNP rs4420638 near the APOC1 gene, achieved genome-wide significance (allele-based P=1.8×10(-10)). However, logistic regression analysis revealed that this association, which was replicated in an independent German sample, is fully explicable by linkage disequilibrium with the APOE allele ?4, the only variant hitherto established as a major genetic determinant of survival into old age. Our GWAS failed to identify any additional autosomal susceptibility genes. One explanation for this lack of success in our study would be that GWAS provide only limited statistical power for a polygenic phenotype with loci of small effect such as human longevity. A recent GWAS in Dutch LLI independently confirmed the APOE-longevity association, thus strengthening the conclusion that this locus is a very, if not the most, important genetic factor influencing longevity.
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A tissue-specific landscape of sense/antisense transcription in the mouse intestine.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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The intestinal mucosa is characterized by complex metabolic and immunological processes driven highly dynamic gene expression programs. With the advent of next generation sequencing and its utilization for the analysis of the RNA sequence space, the level of detail on the global architecture of the transcriptome reached a new order of magnitude compared to microarrays.
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Genome-wide association study identifies two new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis in the Chinese Han population.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing form of inflammatory skin disorder that is affected by genetic and environmental factors. We performed a genome-wide association study of atopic dermatitis in a Chinese Han population using 1,012 affected individuals (cases) and 1,362 controls followed by a replication study in an additional 3,624 cases and 12,197 controls of Chinese Han ethnicity, as well as 1,806 cases and 3,256 controls from Germany. We identified previously undescribed susceptibility loci at 5q22.1 (TMEM232 and SLC25A46, rs7701890, P(combined) = 3.15 × 10(-9), odds ratio (OR) = 1.24) and 20q13.33 (TNFRSF6B and ZGPAT, rs6010620, P(combined) = 3.0 × 10(-8), OR = 1.17) and replicated another previously reported locus at 1q21.3 (FLG, rs3126085, P(combined) = 5.90 × 10(-12), OR = 0.82) in the Chinese sample. The 20q13.33 locus also showed evidence for association in the German sample (rs6010620, P = 2.87 × 10(-5), OR = 1.25). Our study identifies new genetic susceptibility factors and suggests previously unidentified biological pathways in atopic dermatitis.
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Toward the blood-borne miRNome of human diseases.
Nat. Methods
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2011
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In a multicenter study, we determined the expression profiles of 863 microRNAs by array analysis of 454 blood samples from human individuals with different cancers or noncancer diseases, and validated this miRNome by quantitative real-time PCR. We detected consistently deregulated profiles for all tested diseases; pathway analysis confirmed disease association of the respective microRNAs. We observed significant correlations (P = 0.004) between the genomic location of disease-associated genetic variants and deregulated microRNAs.
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Chromosome 7p11.2 (EGFR) variation influences glioma risk.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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While gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors, their etiology is largely unknown. To identify novel risk loci for glioma, we conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of two case-control series from France and Germany (2269 cases and 2500 controls). Pooling these data with previously reported UK and US GWA studies provided data on 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls genotyped for 424 460 common tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Using these data, we demonstrate two statistically independent associations between glioma and rs11979158 and rs2252586, at 7p11.2 which encompasses the EGFR gene (population-corrected statistics, P(c) = 7.72 × 10(-8) and 2.09 × 10(-8), respectively). Both associations were independent of tumor subtype, and were independent of EGFR amplification, p16INK4a deletion and IDH1 mutation status in tumors; compatible with driver effects of the variants on glioma development. These findings show that variation in 7p11.2 is a determinant of inherited glioma risk.
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Polymorphisms in the 3-untranslated region of the CDH1 gene are a risk factor for primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2011
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Primary gastric B-cell lymphomas arise from mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (MALT) in patients with chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. We investigated whether germline variants in the CDH1 gene, coding for E-cadherin, genetically predispose patients to primary gastric B-cell lymphoma.
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Distinct barrier integrity phenotypes in filaggrin-related atopic eczema following sequential tape stripping and lipid profiling.
Exp. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2011
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Filaggrin gene (FLG) loss-of-function mutations have been shown to represent the strongest so far known genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Whereas the barrier characteristics in FLG mutation carriers under baseline conditions have been investigated, there are only limited data on the permeability barrier function in filaggrin-AD under compromised conditions.
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Three ulcerative colitis susceptibility loci are associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis and indicate a role for IL2, REL, and CARD9.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to its pathogenesis. To further clarify its genetic background, we investigated susceptibility loci recently identified for ulcerative colitis (UC) in a large cohort of 1,186 PSC patients and 1,748 controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging 13 UC susceptibility loci were initially genotyped in 854 PSC patients and 1,491 controls from Benelux (331 cases, 735 controls), Germany (265 cases, 368 controls), and Scandinavia (258 cases, 388 controls). Subsequently, a joint analysis was performed with an independent second Scandinavian cohort (332 cases, 257 controls). SNPs at chromosomes 2p16 (P-value 4.12 × 10(-4) ), 4q27 (P-value 4.10 × 10(-5) ), and 9q34 (P-value 8.41 × 10(-4) ) were associated with PSC in the joint analysis after correcting for multiple testing. In PSC patients without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), SNPs at 4q27 and 9q34 were nominally associated (P < 0.05). We applied additional in silico analyses to identify likely candidate genes at PSC susceptibility loci. To identify nonrandom, evidence-based links we used GRAIL (Gene Relationships Across Implicated Loci) analysis showing interconnectivity between genes in six out of in total nine PSC-associated regions. Expression quantitative trait analysis from 1,469 Dutch and UK individuals demonstrated that five out of nine SNPs had an effect on cis-gene expression. These analyses prioritized IL2, CARD9, and REL as novel candidates.
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Characterization of changes in serum anti-glycan antibodies in Crohns disease--a longitudinal analysis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2011
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Anti-glycan antibodies are a promising tool for differential diagnosis and disease stratification of patients with Crohns disease (CD). We longitudinally assessed level and status changes of anti-glycan antibodies over time in individual CD patients as well as determinants of this phenomenon.
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A comprehensive analysis of the COL29A1 gene does not support a role in eczema.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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Based on a recent positional cloning approach, it was claimed that the collagen 29A1 gene (COL29A1), which encodes an epidermal collagen, represents a major risk gene for eczema underlying a previously reported linkage to chromosome 3q21. However, thus far, not a single replication attempt has been published, and no definitive functional data have been provided.
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Pregnancy in primary sclerosing cholangitis.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2011
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There is a paucity of data on fertility or pregnancy in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).
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Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis.
, Stephen Sawcer, Garrett Hellenthal, Matti Pirinen, Chris C A Spencer, Nikolaos A Patsopoulos, Loukas Moutsianas, Alexander Dilthey, Zhan Su, Colin Freeman, Sarah E Hunt, Sarah Edkins, Emma Gray, David R Booth, Simon C Potter, An Goris, Gavin Band, Annette Bang Oturai, Amy Strange, Janna Saarela, Celine Bellenguez, Bertrand Fontaine, Matthew Gillman, Bernhard Hemmer, Rhian Gwilliam, Frauke Zipp, Alagurevathi Jayakumar, Roland Martin, Stephen Leslie, Stanley Hawkins, Eleni Giannoulatou, Sandra D'Alfonso, Hannah Blackburn, Filippo Martinelli Boneschi, Jennifer Liddle, Hanne F Harbo, Marc L Perez, Anne Spurkland, Matthew J Waller, Marcin P Mycko, Michelle Ricketts, Manuel Comabella, Naomi Hammond, Ingrid Kockum, Owen T McCann, Maria Ban, Pamela Whittaker, Anu Kemppinen, Paul Weston, Clive Hawkins, Sara Widaa, John Zajicek, Serge Dronov, Neil Robertson, Suzannah J Bumpstead, Lisa F Barcellos, Rathi Ravindrarajah, Roby Abraham, Lars Alfredsson, Kristin Ardlie, Cristin Aubin, Amie Baker, Katharine Baker, Sergio E Baranzini, Laura Bergamaschi, Roberto Bergamaschi, Allan Bernstein, Achim Berthele, Mike Boggild, Jonathan P Bradfield, David Brassat, Simon A Broadley, Dorothea Buck, Helmut Butzkueven, Ruggero Capra, William M Carroll, Paola Cavalla, Elisabeth G Celius, Sabine Cepok, Rosetta Chiavacci, Françoise Clerget-Darpoux, Katleen Clysters, Giancarlo Comi, Mark Cossburn, Isabelle Cournu-Rebeix, Mathew B Cox, Wendy Cozen, Bruce A C Cree, Anne H Cross, Daniele Cusi, Mark J Daly, Emma Davis, Paul I W de Bakker, Marc Debouverie, Marie Beatrice D'hooghe, Katherine Dixon, Rita Dobosi, Bénédicte Dubois, David Ellinghaus, Irina Elovaara, Federica Esposito, Claire Fontenille, Simon Foote, Andre Franke, Daniela Galimberti, Angelo Ghezzi, Joseph Glessner, Refujia Gomez, Olivier Gout, Colin Graham, Struan F A Grant, Franca Rosa Guerini, Hakon Hakonarson, Per Hall, Anders Hamsten, Hans-Peter Hartung, Rob N Heard, Simon Heath, Jeremy Hobart, Muna Hoshi, Carmen Infante-Duarte, Gillian Ingram, Wendy Ingram, Talat Islam, Maja Jagodic, Michael Kabesch, Allan G Kermode, Trevor J Kilpatrick, Cecilia Kim, Norman Klopp, Keijo Koivisto, Malin Larsson, Mark Lathrop, Jeannette S Lechner-Scott, Maurizio A Leone, Virpi Leppä, Ulrika Liljedahl, Izaura Lima Bomfim, Robin R Lincoln, Jenny Link, Jianjun Liu, Aslaug R Lorentzen, Sara Lupoli, Fabio Macciardi, Thomas Mack, Mark Marriott, Vittorio Martinelli, Deborah Mason, Jacob L McCauley, Frank Mentch, Inger-Lise Mero, Tania Mihalova, Xavier Montalban, John Mottershead, Kjell-Morten Myhr, Paola Naldi, William Ollier, Alison Page, Aarno Palotie, Jean Pelletier, Laura Piccio, Trevor Pickersgill, Fredrik Piehl, Susan Pobywajlo, Hong L Quach, Patricia P Ramsay, Mauri Reunanen, Richard Reynolds, John D Rioux, Mariaemma Rodegher, Sabine Roesner, Justin P Rubio, Ina-Maria Rückert, Marco Salvetti, Erika Salvi, Adam Santaniello, Catherine A Schaefer, Stefan Schreiber, Christian Schulze, Rodney J Scott, Finn Sellebjerg, Krzysztof W Selmaj, David Sexton, Ling Shen, Brigid Simms-Acuna, Sheila Skidmore, Patrick M A Sleiman, Cathrine Smestad, Per Soelberg Sørensen, Helle Bach Søndergaard, Jim Stankovich, Richard C Strange, Anna-Maija Sulonen, Emilie Sundqvist, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Francesca Taddeo, Bruce Taylor, Jenefer M Blackwell, Pentti Tienari, Elvira Bramon, Ayman Tourbah, Matthew A Brown, Ewa Tronczynska, Juan P Casas, Niall Tubridy, Aiden Corvin, Jane Vickery, Janusz Jankowski, Pablo Villoslada, Hugh S Markus, Kai Wang, Christopher G Mathew, James Wason, Colin N A Palmer, H-Erich Wichmann, Robert Plomin, Ernest Willoughby, Anna Rautanen, Juliane Winkelmann, Michael Wittig, Richard C Trembath, Jacqueline Yaouanq, Ananth C Viswanathan, Haitao Zhang, Nicholas W Wood, Rebecca Zuvich, Panos Deloukas, Cordelia Langford, Audrey Duncanson, Jorge R Oksenberg, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Jonathan L Haines, Tomas Olsson, Jan Hillert, Adrian J Ivinson, Philip L De Jager, Leena Peltonen, Graeme J Stewart, David A Hafler, Stephen L Hauser, Gil McVean, Peter Donnelly, Alastair Compston.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
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Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals, and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk. Modestly powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects have a key role in disease susceptibility. Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9,772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the HLA-DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly overrepresented among those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T-helper-cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.
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Genome-wide association analysis and fine mapping of NT-proBNP level provide novel insight into the role of the MTHFR-CLCN6-NPPA-NPPB gene cluster.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2011
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High blood concentration of the N-terminal cleavage product of the B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is strongly associated with cardiac dysfunction and is increasingly used for heart failure diagnosis. To identify genetic variants associated with NT-proBNP level, we performed a genome-wide association analysis in 1325 individuals from South Tyrol, Italy, and followed up the most significant results in 1746 individuals from two German population-based studies. A genome-wide significant signal in the MTHFR-CLCN6-NPPA-NPPB gene cluster was replicated, after correction for multiple testing (replication one-sided P-value = 8.4 × 10(-10)). A conditional regression analysis of 128 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the region of interest identified novel variants in the CLCN6 gene as independently associated with NT-proBNP. In this locus, four haplotypes were associated with increased NT-proBNP levels (haplotype-specific combined P-values from 8.3 × 10(-03) to 9.3 × 10(-11)). The observed increase in the NT-proBNP level was proportional to the number of haplotype copies present (i.e. dosage effect), with an increase associated with two copies that varied between 20 and 100 pg/ml across populations. The identification of novel variants in the MTHFR-CLCN6-NPPA-NPPB cluster provides new insights into the biological mechanisms of cardiac dysfunction.
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Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47.
Carl A Anderson, Gabrielle Boucher, Charlie W Lees, Andre Franke, Mauro D'Amato, Kent D Taylor, James C Lee, Philippe Goyette, Marcin Imielinski, Anna Latiano, Caroline Lagacé, Regan Scott, Leila Amininejad, Suzannah Bumpstead, Leonard Baidoo, Robert N Baldassano, Murray Barclay, Theodore M Bayless, Stephan Brand, Carsten Büning, Jean-Frédéric Colombel, Lee A Denson, Martine De Vos, Marla Dubinsky, Cathryn Edwards, David Ellinghaus, Rudolf S N Fehrmann, James A B Floyd, Timothy Florin, Denis Franchimont, Lude Franke, Michel Georges, Jürgen Glas, Nicole L Glazer, Stephen L Guthery, Talin Haritunians, Nicholas K Hayward, Jean-Pierre Hugot, Gilles Jobin, Debby Laukens, Ian Lawrance, Marc Lémann, Arie Levine, Cécile Libioulle, Edouard Louis, Dermot P McGovern, Monica Milla, Grant W Montgomery, Katherine I Morley, Craig Mowat, Aylwin Ng, William Newman, Roel A Ophoff, Laura Papi, Orazio Palmieri, Laurent Peyrin-Biroulet, Julian Panés, Anne Phillips, Natalie J Prescott, Deborah D Proctor, Rebecca Roberts, Richard Russell, Paul Rutgeerts, Jeremy Sanderson, Miquel Sans, Philip Schumm, Frank Seibold, Yashoda Sharma, Lisa A Simms, Mark Seielstad, A Hillary Steinhart, Stephan R Targan, Leonard H van den Berg, Morten Vatn, Hein Verspaget, Thomas Walters, Cisca Wijmenga, David C Wilson, Harm-Jan Westra, Ramnik J Xavier, Zhen Z Zhao, Cyriel Y Ponsioen, Vibeke Andersen, Leif Törkvist, Maria Gazouli, Nicholas P Anagnou, Tom H Karlsen, Limas Kupcinskas, Jurgita Šventoraitytė, John C Mansfield, Subra Kugathasan, Mark S Silverberg, Jonas Halfvarson, Jerome I Rotter, Christopher G Mathew, Anne M Griffiths, Richard Gearry, Tariq Ahmad, Steven R Brant, Mathias Chamaillard, Jack Satsangi, Judy H Cho, Stefan Schreiber, Mark J Daly, Jeffrey C Barrett, Miles Parkes, Vito Annese, Hakon Hakonarson, Graham Radford-Smith, Richard H Duerr, Séverine Vermeire, Rinse K Weersma, John D Rioux.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of six ulcerative colitis genome-wide association study datasets, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed up the top association signals in 9,628 cases and 12,917 controls. We identified 29 additional risk loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), increasing the number of ulcerative colitis-associated loci to 47. After annotating associated regions using GRAIL, expression quantitative trait loci data and correlations with non-synonymous SNPs, we identified many candidate genes that provide potentially important insights into disease pathogenesis, including IL1R2, IL8RA-IL8RB, IL7R, IL12B, DAP, PRDM1, JAK2, IRF5, GNA12 and LSP1. The total number of confirmed inflammatory bowel disease risk loci is now 99, including a minimum of 28 shared association signals between Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis.
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Deep resequencing of GWAS loci identifies independent rare variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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More than 1,000 susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common variants; however, the specific genes and full allelic spectrum of causal variants underlying these findings have not yet been defined. Here we used pooled next-generation sequencing to study 56 genes from regions associated with Crohns disease in 350 cases and 350 controls. Through follow-up genotyping of 70 rare and low-frequency protein-altering variants in nine independent case-control series (16,054 Crohns disease cases, 12,153 ulcerative colitis cases and 17,575 healthy controls), we identified four additional independent risk factors in NOD2, two additional protective variants in IL23R, a highly significant association with a protective splice variant in CARD9 (P < 1 × 10(-16), odds ratio ? 0.29) and additional associations with coding variants in IL18RAP, CUL2, C1orf106, PTPN22 and MUC19. We extend the results of successful GWAS by identifying new, rare and probably functional variants that could aid functional experiments and predictive models.
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Genetic polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinase 3 in primary sclerosing cholangitis.
Liver Int.
PUBLISHED: 12-07-2010
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The damaging cholestasis inherent to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) results from bile duct stricturing because of progressive fibrosis. The matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) degrades a wide range of matrix components and is expressed by activated liver stellate cells, and so is a candidate for involvement with the fibrotic processes underlying PSC. Moreover, the MMP3 gene harbours polymorphisms associated with variation in its activity directly impacting clinical phenotypes.
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A duplication in 1q21.3 in a family with early onset and childhood absence epilepsy.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2010
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Early onset absence epilepsy (EOAE) starting before the age of 4 years constitutes a rare subgroup of the idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). A strong genetic component in IGE has been suggested by twin and family studies. We describe a boy with absence seizures starting at the age of 9 months whose parents both had childhood absence epilepsy. A 192-kb duplication in 1q21.3 was identified in the proband and his father, encompassing the gene CHRNB2 coding for the ?-2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the gene ADAR coding for adenosine deaminase, an enzyme responsible for RNA editing. Both are candidate genes for seizure disorders. The duplication was not identified in 191 independent IGE patients (93 EOAE; 98 classical IGE) or in 1,157 population controls.
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Identification of FOXP1 deletions in three unrelated patients with mental retardation and significant speech and language deficits.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2010
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Mental retardation affects 2-3% of the population and shows a high heritability.Neurodevelopmental disorders that include pronounced impairment in language and speech skills occur less frequently. For most cases, the molecular basis of mental retardation with or without speech and language disorder is unknown due to the heterogeneity of underlying genetic factors.We have used molecular karyotyping on 1523 patients with mental retardation to detect copy number variations (CNVs) including deletions or duplications. These studies revealed three heterozygous overlapping deletions solely affecting the forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) gene. All three patients had moderate mental retardation and significant language and speech deficits. Since our results are consistent with a de novo occurrence of these deletions, we considered them as causal although we detected a single large deletion including FOXP1 and additional genes in 4104 ancestrally matched controls. These findings are of interest with regard to the structural and functional relationship between FOXP1 and FOXP2. Mutations in FOXP2 have been previously related to monogenic cases of developmental verbal dyspraxia. Both FOXP1 and FOXP2 are expressed in songbird and human brain regions that are important for the developmental processes that culminate in speech and language.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.