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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Evolution of long-toothed fishes and the changing nature of fish-benthos interactions on coral reefs.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Interactions between fishes and the benthos have shaped the development of marine ecosystems since at least the early Mesozoic. Here, using the morphology of fish teeth as an indicator of feeding abilities, we quantify changes over the last 240 million years of reef fish evolution. Fossil and extant coral reef fish assemblages reveal exceptional stasis in tooth design over time, with one notable exception, a distinct long-toothed form. Arising only in the last 40 million years, these long-toothed fishes have bypassed the invertebrate link in the food chain, feeding directly on benthic particulate material. With the appearance of elongated teeth, these specialized detritivores have moved from eating invertebrates to eating the food of invertebrates. Over evolutionary time, fishes have slid back down the food chain.
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Consumer diversity interacts with prey defenses to drive ecosystem function.
Ecology
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2013
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Prey traits linking consumer diversity to ecosystem function remain poorly understood. On tropical coral reefs, herbivores promote coral dominance by suppressing competing macroalgae, but the roles of herbivore identity and diversity, macroalgal defenses, and their interactions in affecting reef resilience and function are unclear. We studied adjacent pairs of no-take marine reserves and fished areas on reefs in Fiji and found that protected reefs supported 7-17x greater biomass, 2-3x higher species richness of herbivorous fishes, and 3-11x more live coral cover than did fished reefs. In contrast, macroalgae were 27-61x more abundant and 3-4x more species-rich on fished reefs. When we transplanted seven common macroalgae from fished reefs into reserves they were rapidly consumed, suggesting that rates of herbivory (ecosystem functioning) differed inside vs. outside reserves. We then video-recorded feeding activity on the same seven macroalgae when transplanted into reserves, and assessed the functional redundancy vs. complementarity of herbivorous fishes consuming these macroalgae. Of 29 species of larger herbivorous fishes on these reefs, only four species accounted for 97% of macroalgal consumption. Two unicornfish consumed a range of brown macroalgae, a parrotfish consumed multiple red algae, and a rabbitfish consumed a green alga, with almost no diet overlap among these groups. The two most chemically rich, allelopathic algae were each consumed by a single, but different, fish species. This striking complementarity resulted from herbivore species differing in their tolerances to macroalgal chemical and structural defenses. A model of assemblage diet breadth based on our feeding observations predicted that high browser diversity would be required for effective control of macroalgae on Fijian reefs. In support of this model, we observed strong negative relationships between herbivore diversity and macroalgal abundance and diversity across the six study reefs. Our findings indicate that the total diet breadth of the herbivore community and the probability of all macroalgae being removed from reefs by herbivores increases with increasing herbivore diversity, but that a few critical species drive this relationship. Therefore, interactions between algal defenses and herbivore tolerances create an essential role for consumer diversity in the functioning and resilience of coral reefs.
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A multilocus molecular phylogeny of combtooth blennies (Percomorpha: Blennioidei: Blenniidae): Multiple invasions of intertidal habitats.
Mol. Phylogenet. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2013
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The combtooth blennies (f. Blenniidae) is a diverse family of primarily marine fishes with approximately 387 species that inhabit subtidal, intertidal, supralittoral habitats in tropical and warm temperate regions throughout the world. The Blenniidae has typically been divided into six groups based on morphological characters: Blenniini, Nemophini, Omobranchini, Phenablenniini, Parablenniini, and Salariini. There is, however, considerable debate over the validity of these groups and their relationships. Since little is known about the relationships in this group, other aspects of their evolutionary history, such as habitat evolution and remain unexplored. Herein, we use Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of four nuclear loci (ENC1, myh6, ptr, and tbr1) from 102 species, representing 41 genera, to resolve the phylogeny of the Blenniidae, determine the validity of the previously recognized groupings, and explore the evolution of habitat association using ancestral state reconstruction. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of the resulting 3100bp of DNA sequence produced nearly identical topologies, and identified many well-supported clades. Of these clades, Nemophini was the only traditionally recognized group strongly supported as monophyletic. This highly resolved and thoroughly sampled blenniid phylogeny provides strong evidence that the traditional rank-based classification does not adequately delimit monophyletic groups with the Blenniidae. This phylogeny redefines the taxonomy of the group and supports the use of 13 unranked clades for the classification of blenniids. Ancestral state reconstructions identified four independent invasions of intertidal habitats within the Blenniidae, and subsequent invasions into supralittoral and freshwater habitats from these groups. The independent invasions of intertidal habitats are likely to have played an important role in the evolutionary history of blennies.
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Spatial variation in abundance, size and orientation of juvenile corals related to the biomass of parrotfishes on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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For species with complex life histories such as scleractinian corals, processes occurring early in life can greatly influence the number of individuals entering the adult population. A plethora of studies have examined settlement patterns of coral larvae, mostly on artificial substrata, and the composition of adult corals across multiple spatial and temporal scales. However, relatively few studies have examined the spatial distribution of small (?50 mm diameter) sexually immature corals on natural reef substrata. We, therefore, quantified the variation in the abundance, composition and size of juvenile corals (?50 mm diameter) among 27 sites, nine reefs, and three latitudes spanning over 1000 km on Australias Great Barrier Reef. Overall, 2801 juveniles were recorded with a mean density of 6.9 (±0.3 SE) ind.m(-2), with Acropora, Pocillopora, and Porites accounting for 84.1% of all juvenile corals surveyed. Size-class structure, orientation on the substrate and taxonomic composition of juvenile corals varied significantly among latitudinal sectors. The abundance of juvenile corals varied both within (6-13 ind.m(-2)) and among reefs (2.8-11.1 ind.m(-2)) but was fairly similar among latitudes (6.1-8.2 ind.m(-2)), despite marked latitudinal variation in larval supply and settlement rates previously found at this scale. Furthermore, the density of juvenile corals was negatively correlated with the biomass of scraping and excavating parrotfishes across all sites, revealing a potentially important role of parrotfishes in determining distribution patterns of juvenile corals on the Great Barrier Reef. While numerous studies have advocated the importance of parrotfishes for clearing space on the substrate to facilitate coral settlement, our results suggest that at high biomass they may have a detrimental effect on juvenile coral assemblages. There is, however, a clear need to directly quantify rates of mortality and growth of juvenile corals to understand the relative importance of these mechanisms in shaping juvenile, and consequently adult, coral assemblages.
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Human activity selectively impacts the ecosystem roles of parrotfishes on coral reefs.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2011
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Around the globe, coral reefs and other marine ecosystems are increasingly overfished. Conventionally, studies of fishing impacts have focused on the population size and dynamics of targeted stocks rather than the broader ecosystem-wide effects of harvesting. Using parrotfishes as an example, we show how coral reef fish populations respond to escalating fishing pressure across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Based on these fish abundance data, we infer the potential impact on four key functional roles performed by parrotfishes. Rates of bioerosion and coral predation are highly sensitive to human activity, whereas grazing and sediment removal are resilient to fishing. Our results offer new insights into the vulnerability and resilience of coral reefs to the ever-growing human footprint. The depletion of fishes causes differential decline of key ecosystem functions, radically changing the dynamics of coral reefs and setting the stage for future ecological surprises.
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Resveratrol improves cardiovascular function in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.
Curr Pharm Biotechnol
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2011
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The phytoalexin resveratrol (3,4,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) may attenuate cardiovascular disease in man. This study has determined whether treatment with resveratrol (1 mg/kg/day orally) prevented cardiac fibrosis and the decreased cardiovascular function in the DOCA-salt hypertensive rat as a model of human hypertension. Uninephrectomised rats (UNX) administered DOCA (25mg every 4th day sc) and 1% NaCl in drinking water for 28 days developed cardiac and vascular remodelling. In these DOCA-salt rats, resveratrol decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, decreased cardiac fibrosis (left ventricular interstitial and perivascular collagen content) and improved cardiac and vascular function. Resveratrol attenuated other features of cardiovascular remodelling such as increases in systolic blood pressure, left ventricular wet weight, left ventricular wall thickness, diastolic stiffness constant, as well as decreased cardiac contractility and prolonged action potential duration characteristic of DOCA-salt rats. In summary, resveratrol, at a nutritionally relevant dose, prevents or attenuates the adverse changes in the cardiovascular system. We propose that the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of resveratrol are responsible, at least in part, for its amelioration in cardiovascular remodelling in DOCA-salt rats. These actions of resveratrol could play an important role in the protective effects on the human cardiovascular system reported for this constituent of red wine.
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High macroalgal cover and low coral recruitment undermines the potential resilience of the worlds southernmost coral reef assemblages.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2011
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Coral reefs are under increasing pressure from anthropogenic and climate-induced stressors. The ability of reefs to reassemble and regenerate after disturbances (i.e., resilience) is largely dependent on the capacity of herbivores to prevent macroalgal expansion, and the replenishment of coral populations through larval recruitment. Currently there is a paucity of this information for higher latitude, subtropical reefs. To assess the potential resilience of the benthic reef assemblages of Lord Howe Island (31°32S, 159°04E), the worlds southernmost coral reef, we quantified the benthic composition, densities of juvenile corals (as a proxy for coral recruitment), and herbivorous fish communities. Despite some variation among habitats and sites, benthic communities were dominated by live scleractinian corals (mean cover 37.4%) and fleshy macroalgae (20.9%). Live coral cover was higher than in most other subtropical reefs and directly comparable to lower latitude tropical reefs. Juvenile coral densities (0.8 ind.m(-2)), however, were 5-200 times lower than those reported for tropical reefs. Overall, macroalgal cover was negatively related to the cover of live coral and the density of juvenile corals, but displayed no relationship with herbivorous fish biomass. The biomass of herbivorous fishes was relatively low (204 kg.ha(-1)), and in marked contrast to tropical reefs was dominated by macroalgal browsing species (84.1%) with relatively few grazing species. Despite their extremely low biomass, grazing fishes were positively related to both the density of juvenile corals and the cover of bare substrata, suggesting that they may enhance the recruitment of corals through the provision of suitable settlement sites. Although Lord Howe Islands reefs are currently coral-dominated, the high macroalgal cover, coupled with limited coral recruitment and low coral growth rates suggest these reefs may be extremely susceptible to future disturbances.
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Chronic ?-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment controls cardiovascular remodeling in heart failure in the aging spontaneously hypertensive rat.
J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2011
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Selective ?1-adrenoceptor antagonists are part of standard therapy to prolong survival in human heart failure. This study has measured structural, functional, and electrical changes in the cardiovascular system of aging male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) to determine whether ?1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment can prevent or reverse the development of cardiovascular remodeling and heart failure in these rats. Fifteen-month-old male Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats or SHRs were treated with increasing metoprolol doses (30 mg·kg·d for 4 weeks, then 50 mg·kg·d for 4 weeks, then 80 mg·kg·d for 16 weeks po). Cardiovascular structure and function were determined using organ wet weight, in vivo echocardiography, histological analysis of inflammation and collagen, isolated heart and thoracic aortic ring preparations, and single cell microelectrode measurements. From 15 months, untreated SHRs developed left ventricular dilation, hypertrophy, inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis, and action potential prolongation together with progressive systolic, diastolic, and endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiac stiffness. Treatment with metoprolol decreased systolic blood pressure at 21 months only but improved survival, decreased ventricular weight, prevented chamber dilation, reduced inflammation, decreased fibrosis, attenuated action potential prolongation, improved systolic and diastolic function, decreased stiffness and improved endothelium-independent vascular responses. Chronic metoprolol treatment markedly attenuated both cardiac and vascular remodeling in the aging SHRs, thus attenuating the onset of heart failure and improving survival, independent of blood pressure reduction.
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Cardiovascular changes during maturation and ageing in male and female spontaneously hypertensive rats.
J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Cardiovascular remodeling leading to heart failure is common in the elderly. Testing effective pharmacological treatment of human heart failure requires a suitable animal model that adequately mimics the human disease state.
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Suppression of herbivory by macroalgal density: a critical feedback on coral reefs?
Ecol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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Coral reefs globally are in decline, with some reefs undergoing phase shifts from coral-dominance to degraded states dominated by large fleshy macroalgae. These shifts have been underpinned by the overharvesting of herbivorous fishes and represent a fundamental change in the physical structure of these reefs. Although the physical structure provided by corals is regarded as a key feature that facilitates herbivore activity, the influence of the physical structure of macroalgal stands is largely unknown. Using transplanted Sargassum, the largest coral reef macroalga, we created habitat patches of predetermined macroalgal density (0.25-6.23 kg m(-2)). Remote video cameras revealed both grazing and browsing fishes avoided high density patches, preferring relatively open areas with low macroalgal cover. This behaviour may provide a positive feedback leading to the growth and persistence of macroalgal stands; increasing the stability of phase shifts to macroalgae.
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Timeline of cardiac dystrophy in 3-18-month-old MDX mice.
Muscle Nerve
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2010
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The dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mouse remains the most commonly used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Mdx mice show a predominantly covert cardiomyopathy, the hallmark of which is fibrosis. We compared mdx and normal mice at six ages (3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 months) using in vivo assessment of cardiac function, selective collagen staining, and measures of TGF-? mRNA, Evans blue dye infiltration, macrophage infiltration, and aortic wall thickness. Clear temporal progression was demonstrated, including early fragility of cardiomyocyte membranes, which has an unrelated impact on cardiac function but is associated with macrophage infiltration and fibrosis. Aortic wall thickness is less in older mdx mice. Mdx mice display impaired responses to inotropic challenge from a young age; this is indicative of altered adrenoreceptor function. We draw attention to the paradox of ongoing fibrosis in mdx hearts without a strong molecular signature (in the form of TGF-? mRNA expression).
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Rosuvastatin attenuates heart failure and cardiac remodelling in the ageing spontaneously hypertensive rat.
Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2009
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3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl(HMG)-Coenzyme(Co)A reductase inhibitors such as rosuvastatin may improve clinical status in patients with hypertension and heart failure. The ageing spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) closely mimics the chronic heart failure disease process observed in humans. This study examined the structural and functional changes in the cardiovascular system of 15-month-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats treated with rosuvastatin (20?mg/kg/day perorally) for 24?weeks. Cardiovascular structure and function were monitored serially by echocardiography. At 21?months, ex vivo Langendorff, electrophysiological or histological studies were performed. Chronic rosuvastatin treatment attenuated elevations of left ventricular wet weight (mg/g body weight: 21-month WKY, 2.30?±?0.04; 15-month SHR, 3.03?±?0.08; 21-month SHR, 4.09?±?0.10; 21-month SHR?+?rosuvastatin, 3.50?±?0.13), myocardial extracellular matrix content (% left ventricular area: 21-month WKY, 7.6?±?0.5; 15-month SHR, 13.2?±?0.8; 21-month SHR 19.6?±?1.0; 21-month SHR with rosuvastatin 14.6?±?1.2) and diastolic stiffness (?: 21-month WKY, 24.9?±?0.6; 15-month SHR, 26.4?±?0.4; 21-month SHR, 33.1?±?0.8; 21-month SHR?+?rosuvastatin, 27.5?±?0.6) as well as attenuating the deterioration of systolic and diastolic function (fractional shortening %: 21-month WKY, 66?±?2; 15-month SHR, 51?±?3; 21-month SHR, 38?±?3; 21-month SHR?+?rosuvastatin, 52?±?4). There was no effect on the increased systolic blood pressure, plasma low-density lipoprotein concentrations or the prolonged action potential duration. Thus, chronic rosuvastatin treatment may attenuate myocardial dysfunction in heart failure by preventing fibrosis.
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A novel and simple method for genotyping the mdx mouse using high-resolution melt polymerase chain reaction.
Muscle Nerve
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2009
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The mdx mouse mutation arises from a C-to-T point mutation, which terminates the translation of dystrophin and results in the loss of a functional dystrophin protein. mdx mice are used widely in studies of the role of dystrophin and of potential treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, thus accurate genotyping is essential. Current methods require labor-intensive efforts and can often lead to misconstrued results. This study describes a simple and highly reliable, sensitive, and user-friendly, high-resolution melt (HRM) assay that is able to utilize DNA obtained from a variety of sources in order to genotype the known sequence variant of the mdx mouse. Muscle Nerve 39: 603-608, 2009.
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Weak compliance undermines the success of no-take zones in a large government-controlled marine protected area.
PLoS ONE
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The effectiveness of marine protected areas depends largely on whether people comply with the rules. We quantified temporal changes in benthic composition, reef fish biomass, and fishing effort among marine park zones (including no-take areas) to assess levels of compliance following the 2005 rezoning of the government-controlled Karimunjawa National Park (KNP), Indonesia. Four years after the rezoning awareness of fishing regulations was high amongst local fishers, ranging from 79.5±7.9 (SE) % for spatial restrictions to 97.7±1.2% for bans on the use of poisons. Despite this high awareness and strong compliance with gear restrictions, compliance with spatial restrictions was weak. In the four years following the rezoning reef fish biomass declined across all zones within KNP, with >50% reduction within the no-take Core and Protection Zones. These declines were primarily driven by decreases in the biomass of groups targeted by local fishers; planktivores, herbivores, piscivores, and invertivores. These declines in fish biomass were not driven by changes in habitat quality; coral cover increased in all zones, possibly as a result of a shift in fishing gears from those which can damage reefs (i.e., nets) to those which cause little direct damage (i.e., handlines and spears). Direct observations of fishing activities in 2009 revealed there was limited variation in fishing effort between zones in which fishing was allowed or prohibited. The apparent willingness of the KNP communities to comply with gear restrictions, but not spatial restrictions is difficult to explain and highlights the complexities of the social and economic dynamics that influence the ecological success of marine protected areas. Clearly the increased and high awareness of fishery restrictions following the rezoning is a positive step. The challenge now is to understand and foster the conditions that may facilitate compliance with spatial restrictions within KNP and marine parks worldwide.
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Functional composition of Chaetodon butterflyfishes at a peripheral and extreme coral reef location, the Persian Gulf.
Mar. Pollut. Bull.
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The functional composition of reef fish assemblages is highly conserved across large biogeographic areas, but it is unknown whether assembly rules hold at biogeographical and environmental extremes for coral reefs. This study examined the functional composition of butterflyfishes in the Persian Gulf, Musandam Peninsula, and Gulf of Oman. Only five species of butterflyfishes were recorded during this study, and mostly just in the Gulf of Oman. Unlike most locations in the Indo-Pacific where butterflyfish assemblages are dominated by obligate corallivores, the only obligate corallivore recorded, Chaetodon melapterus, was rare or absent at all locations. The most common and widespread species was Chaetodon nigropunctatus, which is shown to be a facultative corallivore. The diversity of butterflyfishes in the Persian Gulf is likely to have been constrained by its biogeographical history and isolation, but functional composition appears to be further affected by limited abundance of prey corals and harsh environmental conditions.
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The role of turtles as coral reef macroherbivores.
PLoS ONE
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Herbivory is widely accepted as a vital function on coral reefs. To date, the majority of studies examining herbivory in coral reef environments have focused on the roles of fishes and/or urchins, with relatively few studies considering the potential role of macroherbivores in reef processes. Here, we introduce evidence that highlights the potential role of marine turtles as herbivores on coral reefs. While conducting experimental habitat manipulations to assess the roles of herbivorous reef fishes we observed green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) showing responses that were remarkably similar to those of herbivorous fishes. Reducing the sediment load of the epilithic algal matrix on a coral reef resulted in a forty-fold increase in grazing by green turtles. Hawksbill turtles were also observed to browse transplanted thalli of the macroalga Sargassum swartzii in a coral reef environment. These responses not only show strong parallels to herbivorous reef fishes, but also highlight that marine turtles actively, and intentionally, remove algae from coral reefs. When considering the size and potential historical abundance of marine turtles we suggest that these potentially valuable herbivores may have been lost from many coral reefs before their true importance was understood.
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Coral recovery may not herald the return of fishes on damaged coral reefs.
Oecologia
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The dynamic nature of coral reefs offers a rare opportunity to examine the response of ecosystems to disruption due to climate change. In 1998, the Great Barrier Reef experienced widespread coral bleaching and mortality. As a result, cryptobenthic fish assemblages underwent a dramatic phase-shift. Thirteen years, and up to 96 fish generations later, the cryptobenthic fish assemblage has not returned to its pre-bleach configuration. This is despite coral abundances returning to, or exceeding, pre-bleach values. The post-bleach fish assemblage exhibits no evidence of recovery. If these short-lived fish species are a model for their longer-lived counterparts, they suggest that (1) the full effects of the 1998 bleaching event on long-lived fish populations have yet to be seen, (2) it may take decades, or more, before recovery or regeneration of these long-lived species will begin, and (3) fish assemblages may not recover to their previous composition despite the return of corals.
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To feed or to breed: morphological constraints of mouthbrooding in coral reef cardinalfishes.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
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Functionally coupled biomechanical systems are widespread in nature and are viewed as major constraints on evolutionary diversification, yet there have been few attempts to explore the implications of performing multiple functions within a single anatomical structure. Paternally mouthbrooding cardinalfishes present an ideal system to investigate the constraints of functional coupling as the oral jaws of male fishes are directly responsible for both feeding and reproductive functions. To test the effects of (i) mouthbrooding on feeding and (ii) feeding on reproductive potential we compared the feeding apparatus between sexes of nine species of cardinalfish and compared brood characteristics among species from different trophic groups, respectively. Mouthbrooding was strongly associated with the morphology of the feeding apparatus in males. Male cardinalfishes possessed longer heads, snouts and jaws than female conspecifics irrespective of body size, trophic group or evolutionary history. Conversely, reproductive potential also appeared to be related to trophic morphology. Piscivorous cardinalfishes produced larger, but fewer eggs, and had smaller brood volumes than species from the two invertebrate feeding groups. These interrelationships suggest that feeding and reproduction in the mouth of cardinalfishes may be tightly coupled. If so this may, in part, have contributed to the limited morphological diversification exhibited by cardinalfishes.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.