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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Patients with nodding syndrome in Uganda improve with symptomatic treatment: a cross-sectional study.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2014
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Nodding syndrome (NS) is a poorly understood neurological disorder affecting thousands of children in Africa. In March 2012, we introduced a treatment intervention that aimed to provide symptomatic relief. This intervention included sodium valproate for seizures, management of behaviour and emotional difficulties, nutritional therapy and physical rehabilitation. We assessed the clinical and functional outcomes of this intervention after 12?months of implementation.
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Pediatric Cerebral Palsy in Africa: Where Are We?
J. Child Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children worldwide. However, little is reported on this condition in the African context. Doctors from 22 countries in Africa, and representatives from a further 5 countries outside Africa, met to discuss the challenges in the evaluation and management of children with cerebral palsy in Africa and to propose service needs and further research. Basic care is limited by the poor availability of diagnostic facilities or medical personnel with experience and expertise in managing cerebral palsy, exacerbated by lack of available interventions such as medications, surgical procedures, or even regular therapy input. Relevant guidelines are lacking. In order to guide services for children with existing disabilities, to effectively target the main etiologies and to develop preventive strategies for the continent, research priorities must include multicenter collaborative studies looking at the prevalence, risk factors, and treatment of cerebral palsy.
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Exposure to multiple parasites is associated with the prevalence of active convulsive epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2014
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Epilepsy is common in developing countries, and it is often associated with parasitic infections. We investigated the relationship between exposure to parasitic infections, particularly multiple infections and active convulsive epilepsy (ACE), in five sites across sub-Saharan Africa.
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The challenges of managing children with epilepsy in Africa.
Semin Pediatr Neurol
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Children with epilepsy who reside in the African continent are faced with some of the greatest challenges of receiving adequate care. The burden of disease is exacerbated by the high incidence of acquired causes and the large treatment gap. Skilled teams to identify and care for children with epilepsy are lacking. Many patients are managed through psychiatric services, thus potentially compounding the stigma associated with the condition. Little data exist to assess the true proportion of comorbidities suffered by children with epilepsy, the assumption is that this is high, further aggravated by delayed interventions and adverse responses to some of the more commonly used antiepileptic drugs.
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Pediatric cerebral palsy in Africa: a systematic review.
Semin Pediatr Neurol
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Cerebral palsy is a common neurologic problem in children and is reported as occurring in approximately 2-2.5 of 1000 live births globally. As is the case with many pediatric neurologic conditions, very little has been reported on this condition in the African context. Resource-limited settings such as those found across the continent are likely to result in a different spectrum of etiologies, prevalence, severity as well as management approaches. This review aims to establish what has been reported on this condition from the African continent so as to better define key clinical and research questions.
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Adherence to antiepileptic drugs among children attending a tertiary health unit in a low resource setting.
Pan Afr Med J
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Epilepsy is one of the neglected and highly stigmatised diseases, yet it is very common affecting about 70 million people worldwide. In Uganda, the estimated prevalence of epilepsy is 13% with about 156 new cases per 100,000 people per year. Adherence to antiepileptic drugs is crucial in achieving seizure control yet in Uganda; there is lack of information on adherence to antiepileptic drugs and the factors that affect this among children. This study was therefore designed to determine the level of adherence to antiepileptic drugs and the factors that are associated with non adherence.
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Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2013
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Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences.
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Children with epilepsy in Africa: recommendations from the International Child Neurology Association/African Child Neurology Association Workshop.
J. Child Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2013
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This article presents key findings from the International Child Neurology Association/African Child Neurology Association Workshop. The viability of international guidelines for the management of children with epilepsy should be reviewed within each African country, and adapted to comply with the regional capacity. Such recommendations can be used to lobby for resources. More training centers should be developed in Africa, so that specialists can be trained within Africa, in skills relevant to the continent, in collaboration with "out of Africa" visiting-specialists to develop the concept of "train the trainers." At least 1 child neurology specialist per 100,000 of the population is required. Specific to Africa are the challenges from stigma, prejudice, and misconceptions. "Epilepsy teams," inclusive of the traditional healers, would enable management of increased numbers of children, and challenge policy such that it is the right of the child with epilepsy to have reliable access to appropriate antiepileptic drugs, support, and health care equity between the rural and urban settings.
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Adaptation of the ten questions to screen for autism and other neuro-developmental disorders in Uganda.
Autism
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2013
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Neurodevelopmental disorders are recognized to be relatively common in developing countries but little data exist for planning effective prevention and intervention strategies. In particular, data on autism spectrum disorders are lacking. For application in Uganda, we developed a 23-question screener (23Q) that includes the Ten Questions screener and additional questions on autism spectrum disorder behaviors. We then conducted household screening of 1169 children, 2-9 years of age, followed by clinical assessment of children who screened positive and a sample of those who screened negative to evaluate the validity of the screener. We found that 320 children (27% of the total) screened positive and 68 children received a clinical diagnosis of one or more moderate to severe neurodevelopmental disorders (autism spectrum disorder; cerebral palsy; epilepsy; cognitive, speech and language, hearing, or vision impairment), including 8 children with autism spectrum disorders. Prevalence and validity of the screener were evaluated under different statistical assumptions. Sensitivity of the 23Q ranged from 0.55 to 0.80 and prevalence for ?1 neurodevelopmental disorders from 7.7/100 children to 12.8/100 children depending on which assumptions were used. The combination of screening positive on both autism spectrum disorders and Ten Questions items was modestly successful in identifying a subgroup of children at especially high risk of autism spectrum disorders. We recommend that autism spectrum disorders and related behavioral disorders be included in studies of neurodevelopmental disorders in low-resource settings to obtain essential data for planning local and global public health responses.
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Prevalence of active convulsive epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa and associated risk factors: cross-sectional and case-control studies.
Lancet Neurol
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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The prevalence of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa seems to be higher than in other parts of the world, but estimates vary substantially for unknown reasons. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors of active convulsive epilepsy across five centres in this region.
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Clinical, neurological, and electrophysiological features of nodding syndrome in Kitgum, Uganda: an observational case series.
Lancet Neurol
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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Nodding syndrome is an unexplained illness characterised by head-bobbing spells. The clinical and epidemiological features are incompletely described, and the explanation for the nodding and the underlying cause of nodding syndrome are unknown. We aimed to describe the clinical and neurological diagnostic features of this illness.
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An Epidemiologic Investigation of Potential Risk Factors for Nodding Syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nodding Syndrome (NS), an unexplained illness characterized by spells of head bobbing, has been reported in Sudan and Tanzania, perhaps as early as 1962. Hypothesized causes include sorghum consumption, measles, and onchocerciasis infection. In 2009, a couple thousand cases were reportedly in Northern Uganda.
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Nodding syndrome in Ugandan children--clinical features, brain imaging and complications: a case series.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder of uncertain aetiology affecting children in Africa. There is no diagnostic test, and risk factors and symptoms that would allow early diagnosis are poorly documented. This study aimed to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging (MRI) features and complications of nodding syndrome in Ugandan children.
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Child neurology services in Africa.
J. Child Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level.
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Severe neurological sequelae and behaviour problems after cerebral malaria in Ugandan children.
BMC Res Notes
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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Cerebral malaria is the most severe neurological complication of falciparum malaria and a leading cause of death and neuro-disability in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to describe functional deficits and behaviour problems in children who survived cerebral malaria with severe neurological sequelae and identify patterns of brain injury.
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Child neurology practice and neurological disorders in East Africa.
J. Child Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Neurological disorders, including neurodevelopmental disorders, have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the greatest threats to global public health. It is generally believed that these conditions are more prevalent in the developing than the developed world because of multiple known risk factors such as infections, malnutrition, and limited resources for obstetric and neonatal management. In East Africa, few investigations have been conducted to obtain data on the magnitude and description of neurological disorders among children, and the practice of child neurology is faced with challenges cutting across areas of health personnel, patient diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. This article reviews the burden, types, and causes of neurological disorders in the East African region. The challenges and successes in the practice of child neurology and recommendations for the future are discussed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.