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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Scaffold hopping towards potent and selective JAK3 inhibitors: Discovery of novel C-5 substituted pyrrolopyrazines.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2014
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The discovery of a novel series of pyrrolopyrazines as JAK inhibitors with comparable enzyme and cellular activity to tofacitinib is described. The series was identified using a scaffold hopping approach aided by structure based drug design using principles of intramolecular hydrogen bonding for conformational restriction and targeting specific pockets for modulating kinase activity.
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Associations between thyroid hormones and serum metabolite profiles in an euthyroid population.
Metabolomics
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2014
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The aim was to characterise associations between circulating thyroid hormones-free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH)-and the metabolite profiles in serum samples from participants of the German population-based KORA F4 study. Analyses were based on the metabolite profile of 1463 euthyroid subjects. In serum samples, obtained after overnight fasting (?8), 151 different metabolites were quantified in a targeted approach including amino acids, acylcarnitines (ACs), and phosphatidylcholines (PCs). Associations between metabolites and thyroid hormone concentrations were analysed using adjusted linear regression models. To draw conclusions on thyroid hormone related pathways, intra-class metabolite ratios were additionally explored. We discovered 154 significant associations (Bonferroni p < 1.75 × 10(-04)) between FT4 and various metabolites and metabolite ratios belonging to AC and PC groups. Significant associations with TSH were lacking. High FT4 levels were associated with increased concentrations of many ACs and various sums of ACs of different chain length, and the ratio of C2 by C0. The inverse associations observed between FT4 and many serum PCs reflected the general decrease in PC concentrations. Similar results were found in subgroup analyses, e.g., in weight-stable subjects or in obese subjects. Further, results were independent of different parameters for liver or kidney function, or inflammation, which supports the notion of an independent FT4 effect. In fasting euthyroid adults, higher serum FT4 levels are associated with increased serum AC concentrations and an increased ratio of C2 by C0 which is indicative of an overall enhanced fatty acyl mitochondrial transport and ?-oxidation of fatty acids.
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An atlas of genetic influences on human blood metabolites.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2014
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Genome-wide association scans with high-throughput metabolic profiling provide unprecedented insights into how genetic variation influences metabolism and complex disease. Here we report the most comprehensive exploration of genetic loci influencing human metabolism thus far, comprising 7,824 adult individuals from 2 European population studies. We report genome-wide significant associations at 145 metabolic loci and their biochemical connectivity with more than 400 metabolites in human blood. We extensively characterize the resulting in vivo blueprint of metabolism in human blood by integrating it with information on gene expression, heritability and overlap with known loci for complex disorders, inborn errors of metabolism and pharmacological targets. We further developed a database and web-based resources for data mining and results visualization. Our findings provide new insights into the role of inherited variation in blood metabolic diversity and identify potential new opportunities for drug development and for understanding disease.
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Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (SLC26A2) is expressed in the adrenal cortex and regulates aldosterone secretion.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2014
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Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms leading to autonomous aldosterone secretion is a prerequisite to define potential targets and biomarkers in the context of primary aldosteronism. After a genome-wide association study with subjects from the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 survey, we observed a highly significant association (P=6.78×10(-11)) between the aldosterone to renin ratio and a locus at 5q32. Hypothesizing that this locus may contain genes of relevance for the pathogenesis of primary aldosteronism, we investigated solute carrier family 26 member 2 (SLC26A2), a protein with known transport activity for sulfate and other cations. Within murine tissues, adrenal glands showed the highest expression levels for SLC26A2, which was significantly downregulated on in vivo stimulation with angiotensin II and potassium. SLC26A2 expression was found to be significantly lower in aldosterone-producing adenomas in comparison with normal adrenal glands. In adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells, specific knockdown of SLC26A2 resulted in a highly significant increase in aldosterone secretion. Concomitantly, expression of steroidogenic enzymes, as well as upstream effectors including transcription factors such as NR4A1, CAMK1, and intracellular Ca(2+) content, was upregulated in knockdown cells. To substantiate further these findings in an SLC26A2 mutant mouse model, aldosterone output proved to be increased in a sex-specific manner. In summary, these findings point toward a possible effect of SLC26A2 in the regulation of aldosterone secretion potentially involved in the pathogenesis of primary aldosteronism.
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Interrogating causal pathways linking genetic variants, small molecule metabolites, and circulating lipids.
Genome Med
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Emerging technologies based on mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance enable the monitoring of hundreds of small metabolites from tissues or body fluids. Profiling of metabolites can help elucidate causal pathways linking established genetic variants to known disease risk factors such as blood lipid traits.
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Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels.
, Cristen J Willer, Ellen M Schmidt, Sebanti Sengupta, Gina M Peloso, Stefan Gustafsson, Stavroula Kanoni, Andrea Ganna, Jin Chen, Martin L Buchkovich, Samia Mora, Jacques S Beckmann, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Hsing-Yi Chang, Ayse Demirkan, Heleen M den Hertog, Ron Do, Louise A Donnelly, Georg B Ehret, Tonu Esko, Mary F Feitosa, Teresa Ferreira, Krista Fischer, Pierre Fontanillas, Ross M Fraser, Daniel F Freitag, Deepti Gurdasani, Kauko Heikkilä, Elina Hyppönen, Aaron Isaacs, Anne U Jackson, Asa Johansson, Toby Johnson, Marika Kaakinen, Johannes Kettunen, Marcus E Kleber, Xiaohui Li, Jian'an Luan, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Patrik K E Magnusson, Massimo Mangino, Evelin Mihailov, May E Montasser, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Ilja M Nolte, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Cameron D Palmer, Markus Perola, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Serena Sanna, Richa Saxena, Susan K Service, Sonia Shah, Dmitry Shungin, Carlo Sidore, Ci Song, Rona J Strawbridge, Ida Surakka, Toshiko Tanaka, Tanya M Teslovich, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Evita G van den Herik, Benjamin F Voight, Kelly A Volcik, Lindsay L Waite, Andrew Wong, Ying Wu, Weihua Zhang, Devin Absher, Gershim Asiki, Inês Barroso, Latonya F Been, Jennifer L Bolton, Lori L Bonnycastle, Paolo Brambilla, Mary S Burnett, Giancarlo Cesana, Maria Dimitriou, Alex S F Doney, Angela Döring, Paul Elliott, Stephen E Epstein, Gudmundur Ingi Eyjolfsson, Bruna Gigante, Mark O Goodarzi, Harald Grallert, Martha L Gravito, Christopher J Groves, Göran Hallmans, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Dena Hernandez, Andrew A Hicks, Hilma Holm, Yi-Jen Hung, Thomas Illig, Michelle R Jones, Pontiano Kaleebu, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Eric Kim, Norman Klopp, Pirjo Komulainen, Meena Kumari, Claudia Langenberg, Terho Lehtimäki, Shih-Yi Lin, Jaana Lindström, Ruth J F Loos, François Mach, Wendy L McArdle, Christa Meisinger, Braxton D Mitchell, Gabrielle Müller, Ramaiah Nagaraja, Narisu Narisu, Tuomo V M Nieminen, Rebecca N Nsubuga, Isleifur Olafsson, Ken K Ong, Aarno Palotie, Theodore Papamarkou, Cristina Pomilla, Anneli Pouta, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Paul M Ridker, Fernando Rivadeneira, Igor Rudan, Aimo Ruokonen, Nilesh Samani, Hubert Scharnagl, Janet Seeley, Kaisa Silander, Alena Stančáková, Kathleen Stirrups, Amy J Swift, Laurence Tiret, André G Uitterlinden, L Joost van Pelt, Sailaja Vedantam, Nicholas Wainwright, Cisca Wijmenga, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Tom Wilsgaard, James F Wilson, Elizabeth H Young, Jing Hua Zhao, Linda S Adair, Dominique Arveiler, Themistocles L Assimes, Stefania Bandinelli, Franklyn Bennett, Murielle Bochud, Bernhard O Boehm, Dorret I Boomsma, Ingrid B Borecki, Stefan R Bornstein, Pascal Bovet, Michel Burnier, Harry Campbell, Aravinda Chakravarti, John C Chambers, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Francis S Collins, Richard S Cooper, John Danesh, George Dedoussis, Ulf de Faire, Alan B Feranil, Jean Ferrières, Luigi Ferrucci, Nelson B Freimer, Christian Gieger, Leif C Groop, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ulf Gyllensten, Anders Hamsten, Tamara B Harris, Aroon Hingorani, Joel N Hirschhorn, Albert Hofman, G Kees Hovingh, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Steve E Humphries, Steven C Hunt, Kristian Hveem, Carlos Iribarren, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Antti Jula, Mika Kähönen, Jaakko Kaprio, Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Jaspal S Kooner, Peter J Koudstaal, Ronald M Krauss, Diana Kuh, Johanna Kuusisto, Kirsten O Kyvik, Markku Laakso, Timo A Lakka, Lars Lind, Cecilia M Lindgren, Nicholas G Martin, Winfried März, Mark I McCarthy, Colin A McKenzie, Pierre Meneton, Andres Metspalu, Leena Moilanen, Andrew D Morris, Patricia B Munroe, Inger Njølstad, Nancy L Pedersen, Chris Power, Peter P Pramstaller, Jackie F Price, Bruce M Psaty, Thomas Quertermous, Rainer Rauramaa, Danish Saleheen, Veikko Salomaa, Dharambir K Sanghera, Jouko Saramies, Peter E H Schwarz, Wayne H-H Sheu, Alan R Shuldiner, Agneta Siegbahn, Tim D Spector, Kari Stefansson, David P Strachan, Bamidele O Tayo, Elena Tremoli, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Matti Uusitupa, Cornelia M van Duijn, Peter Vollenweider, Lars Wallentin, Nicholas J Wareham, John B Whitfield, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, José M Ordovás, Eric Boerwinkle, Colin N A Palmer, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Daniel I Chasman, Jerome I Rotter, Paul W Franks, Samuli Ripatti, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Stephen S Rich, Michael Boehnke, Panos Deloukas, Sekar Kathiresan, Karen L Mohlke, Erik Ingelsson, Gonçalo R Abecasis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2013
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Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10(-8), including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipid levels are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index. Our results demonstrate the value of using genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestry and provide insights into the biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological and therapeutic research.
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Epigenetics meets metabolomics: an epigenome-wide association study with blood serum metabolic traits.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2013
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Previously, we reported strong influences of genetic variants on metabolic phenotypes, some of them with clinical relevance. Here, we hypothesize that DNA methylation may have an important and potentially independent effect on human metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we conducted what is to the best of our knowledge the first epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) between DNA methylation and metabolic traits (metabotypes) in human blood. We assess 649 blood metabolic traits from 1814 participants of the Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg (KORA) population study for association with methylation of 457 004 CpG sites, determined on the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip platform. Using the EWAS approach, we identified two types of methylome-metabotype associations. One type is driven by an underlying genetic effect; the other type is independent of genetic variation and potentially driven by common environmental and life-style-dependent factors. We report eight CpG loci at genome-wide significance that have a genetic variant as confounder (P = 3.9 × 10(-20) to 2.0 × 10(-108), r(2) = 0.036 to 0.221). Seven loci display CpG site-specific associations to metabotypes, but do not exhibit any underlying genetic signals (P = 9.2 × 10(-14) to 2.7 × 10(-27), r(2) = 0.008 to 0.107). We further identify several groups of CpG loci that associate with a same metabotype, such as 4-vinylphenol sulfate and 4-androsten-3-beta,17-beta-diol disulfate. In these cases, the association between CpG-methylation and metabotype is likely the result of a common external environmental factor, including smoking. Our study shows that analysis of EWAS with large numbers of metabolic traits in large population cohorts are, in principle, feasible. Taken together, our data suggest that DNA methylation plays an important role in regulating human metabolism.
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Biomarkers for type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glucose using a nontargeted metabolomics approach.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2013
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Using a nontargeted metabolomics approach of 447 fasting plasma metabolites, we searched for novel molecular markers that arise before and after hyperglycemia in a large population-based cohort of 2,204 females (115 type 2 diabetic [T2D] case subjects, 192 individuals with impaired fasting glucose [IFG], and 1,897 control subjects) from TwinsUK. Forty-two metabolites from three major fuel sources (carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins) were found to significantly correlate with T2D after adjusting for multiple testing; of these, 22 were previously reported as associated with T2D or insulin resistance. Fourteen metabolites were found to be associated with IFG. Among the metabolites identified, the branched-chain keto-acid metabolite 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate was the strongest predictive biomarker for IFG after glucose (odds ratio [OR] 1.65 [95% CI 1.39-1.95], P = 8.46 × 10(-9)) and was moderately heritable (h(2) = 0.20). The association was replicated in an independent population (n = 720, OR 1.68 [ 1.34-2.11], P = 6.52 × 10(-6)) and validated in 189 twins with urine metabolomics taken at the same time as plasma (OR 1.87 [1.27-2.75], P = 1 × 10(-3)). Results confirm an important role for catabolism of branched-chain amino acids in T2D and IFG. In conclusion, this T2D-IFG biomarker study has surveyed the broadest panel of nontargeted metabolites to date, revealing both novel and known associated metabolites and providing potential novel targets for clinical prediction and a deeper understanding of causal mechanisms.
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Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.
Ron Do, Cristen J Willer, Ellen M Schmidt, Sebanti Sengupta, Chi Gao, Gina M Peloso, Stefan Gustafsson, Stavroula Kanoni, Andrea Ganna, Jin Chen, Martin L Buchkovich, Samia Mora, Jacques S Beckmann, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Hsing-Yi Chang, Ayse Demirkan, Heleen M den Hertog, Louise A Donnelly, Georg B Ehret, Tonu Esko, Mary F Feitosa, Teresa Ferreira, Krista Fischer, Pierre Fontanillas, Ross M Fraser, Daniel F Freitag, Deepti Gurdasani, Kauko Heikkilä, Elina Hyppönen, Aaron Isaacs, Anne U Jackson, Asa Johansson, Toby Johnson, Marika Kaakinen, Johannes Kettunen, Marcus E Kleber, Xiaohui Li, Jian'an Luan, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Patrik K E Magnusson, Massimo Mangino, Evelin Mihailov, May E Montasser, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Ilja M Nolte, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Cameron D Palmer, Markus Perola, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Serena Sanna, Richa Saxena, Susan K Service, Sonia Shah, Dmitry Shungin, Carlo Sidore, Ci Song, Rona J Strawbridge, Ida Surakka, Toshiko Tanaka, Tanya M Teslovich, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Evita G van den Herik, Benjamin F Voight, Kelly A Volcik, Lindsay L Waite, Andrew Wong, Ying Wu, Weihua Zhang, Devin Absher, Gershim Asiki, Inês Barroso, Latonya F Been, Jennifer L Bolton, Lori L Bonnycastle, Paolo Brambilla, Mary S Burnett, Giancarlo Cesana, Maria Dimitriou, Alex S F Doney, Angela Döring, Paul Elliott, Stephen E Epstein, Gudmundur Ingi Eyjolfsson, Bruna Gigante, Mark O Goodarzi, Harald Grallert, Martha L Gravito, Christopher J Groves, Göran Hallmans, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Dena Hernandez, Andrew A Hicks, Hilma Holm, Yi-Jen Hung, Thomas Illig, Michelle R Jones, Pontiano Kaleebu, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Eric Kim, Norman Klopp, Pirjo Komulainen, Meena Kumari, Claudia Langenberg, Terho Lehtimäki, Shih-Yi Lin, Jaana Lindström, Ruth J F Loos, François Mach, Wendy L McArdle, Christa Meisinger, Braxton D Mitchell, Gabrielle Müller, Ramaiah Nagaraja, Narisu Narisu, Tuomo V M Nieminen, Rebecca N Nsubuga, Isleifur Olafsson, Ken K Ong, Aarno Palotie, Theodore Papamarkou, Cristina Pomilla, Anneli Pouta, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Paul M Ridker, Fernando Rivadeneira, Igor Rudan, Aimo Ruokonen, Nilesh Samani, Hubert Scharnagl, Janet Seeley, Kaisa Silander, Alena Stančáková, Kathleen Stirrups, Amy J Swift, Laurence Tiret, André G Uitterlinden, L Joost van Pelt, Sailaja Vedantam, Nicholas Wainwright, Cisca Wijmenga, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Tom Wilsgaard, James F Wilson, Elizabeth H Young, Jing Hua Zhao, Linda S Adair, Dominique Arveiler, Themistocles L Assimes, Stefania Bandinelli, Franklyn Bennett, Murielle Bochud, Bernhard O Boehm, Dorret I Boomsma, Ingrid B Borecki, Stefan R Bornstein, Pascal Bovet, Michel Burnier, Harry Campbell, Aravinda Chakravarti, John C Chambers, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Francis S Collins, Richard S Cooper, John Danesh, George Dedoussis, Ulf de Faire, Alan B Feranil, Jean Ferrières, Luigi Ferrucci, Nelson B Freimer, Christian Gieger, Leif C Groop, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ulf Gyllensten, Anders Hamsten, Tamara B Harris, Aroon Hingorani, Joel N Hirschhorn, Albert Hofman, G Kees Hovingh, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Steve E Humphries, Steven C Hunt, Kristian Hveem, Carlos Iribarren, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Antti Jula, Mika Kähönen, Jaakko Kaprio, Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Jaspal S Kooner, Peter J Koudstaal, Ronald M Krauss, Diana Kuh, Johanna Kuusisto, Kirsten O Kyvik, Markku Laakso, Timo A Lakka, Lars Lind, Cecilia M Lindgren, Nicholas G Martin, Winfried März, Mark I McCarthy, Colin A McKenzie, Pierre Meneton, Andres Metspalu, Leena Moilanen, Andrew D Morris, Patricia B Munroe, Inger Njølstad, Nancy L Pedersen, Chris Power, Peter P Pramstaller, Jackie F Price, Bruce M Psaty, Thomas Quertermous, Rainer Rauramaa, Danish Saleheen, Veikko Salomaa, Dharambir K Sanghera, Jouko Saramies, Peter E H Schwarz, Wayne H-H Sheu, Alan R Shuldiner, Agneta Siegbahn, Tim D Spector, Kari Stefansson, David P Strachan, Bamidele O Tayo, Elena Tremoli, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Matti Uusitupa, Cornelia M van Duijn, Peter Vollenweider, Lars Wallentin, Nicholas J Wareham, John B Whitfield, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, David Altshuler, José M Ordovás, Eric Boerwinkle, Colin N A Palmer, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Daniel I Chasman, Jerome I Rotter, Paul W Franks, Samuli Ripatti, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Stephen S Rich, Michael Boehnke, Panos Deloukas, Karen L Mohlke, Erik Ingelsson, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Mark J Daly, Benjamin M Neale, Sekar Kathiresan.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P < 5 × 10(-8) for each) to examine the role of triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphisms effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.
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Identification and MS-assisted interpretation of genetically influenced NMR signals in human plasma.
Genome Med
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides robust readouts of many metabolic parameters in one experiment. However, identification of clinically relevant markers in 1H NMR spectra is a major challenge. Association of NMR-derived quantities with genetic variants can uncover biologically relevant metabolic traits. Using NMR data of plasma samples from 1,757 individuals from the KORA study together with 655,658 genetic variants, we show that ratios between NMR intensities at two chemical shift positions can provide informative and robust biomarkers. We report seven loci of genetic association with NMR-derived traits (APOA1, CETP, CPS1, GCKR, FADS1, LIPC, PYROXD2) and characterize these traits biochemically using mass spectrometry. These ratios may now be used in clinical studies.
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Genetic associations with lipoprotein subfractions provide information on their biological nature.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2011
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Adverse levels of lipoproteins are highly heritable and constitute risk factors for cardiovascular outcomes. Hitherto, genome-wide association studies revealed 95 lipid-associated loci. However, due to the small effect sizes of these associations large sample numbers (>100 000 samples) were needed. Here we show that analyzing more refined lipid phenotypes, namely lipoprotein subfractions, can increase the number of significantly associated loci compared with bulk high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein analysis in a study with identical sample numbers. Moreover, lipoprotein subfractions provide novel insight into the human lipid metabolism. We measured 15 lipoprotein subfractions (L1-L15) in 1791 samples using (1)H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Using cluster analyses, we quantified inter-relationships among lipoprotein subfractions. Additionally, we analyzed associations with subfractions at known lipid loci. We identified five distinct groups of subfractions: one (L1) was only marginally captured by serum lipids and therefore extends our knowledge of lipoprotein biochemistry. During a lipid-tolerance test, L1 lost its special position. In the association analysis, we found that eight loci (LIPC, CETP, PLTP, FADS1-2-3, SORT1, GCKR, APOB, APOA1) were associated with the subfractions, whereas only four loci (CETP, SORT1, GCKR, APOA1) were associated with serum lipids. For LIPC, we observed a 10-fold increase in the variance explained by our regression models. In conclusion, NMR-based fine mapping of lipoprotein subfractions provides novel information on their biological nature and strengthens the associations with genetic loci. Future clinical studies are now needed to investigate their biomedical relevance.
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Human metabolic individuality in biomedical and pharmaceutical research.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many risk loci for complex diseases, but effect sizes are typically small and information on the underlying biological processes is often lacking. Associations with metabolic traits as functional intermediates can overcome these problems and potentially inform individualized therapy. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of genotype-dependent metabolic phenotypes using a GWAS with non-targeted metabolomics. We identified 37 genetic loci associated with blood metabolite concentrations, of which 25 show effect sizes that are unusually high for GWAS and account for 10-60% differences in metabolite levels per allele copy. Our associations provide new functional insights for many disease-related associations that have been reported in previous studies, including those for cardiovascular and kidney disorders, type 2 diabetes, cancer, gout, venous thromboembolism and Crohns disease. The study advances our knowledge of the genetic basis of metabolic individuality in humans and generates many new hypotheses for biomedical and pharmaceutical research.
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A genome-wide screen for interactions reveals a new locus on 4p15 modifying the effect of waist-to-hip ratio on total cholesterol.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2011
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Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain ?25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for variants that modify the relationship between known epidemiological risk factors and circulating lipid levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data from 18 population-based cohorts with European ancestry (maximum N?=?32,225). We collected 8 further cohorts (N?=?17,102) for replication, and rs6448771 on 4p15 demonstrated genome-wide significant interaction with waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR) on total cholesterol (TC) with a combined P-value of 4.79×10(-9). There were two potential candidate genes in the region, PCDH7 and CCKAR, with differential expression levels for rs6448771 genotypes in adipose tissue. The effect of WHR on TC was strongest for individuals carrying two copies of G allele, for whom a one standard deviation (sd) difference in WHR corresponds to 0.19 sd difference in TC concentration, while for A allele homozygous the difference was 0.12 sd. Our findings may open up possibilities for targeted intervention strategies for people characterized by specific genomic profiles. However, more refined measures of both body-fat distribution and metabolic measures are needed to understand how their joint dynamics are modified by the newly found locus.
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Leeches run cold, then hot.
Biol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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Food processing is costly, potentially limiting the energy and time devoted to other essential functions such as locomotion or reproduction. In ectotherms, post-prandial thermophily, the selection of a warm environmental temperature after feeding, may be advantageous in minimizing the duration of this elevated cost. Although present in many vertebrate taxa, this behaviour had not previously been observed in invertebrates. Sanguivorous leeches ingest large blood meals that are costly to process and limit mobility until excess fluid can actively be expelled to reduce body volume. When presented with a temperature gradient from 10°C to 30°C, leeches select a temperature that is significantly warmer (24.3 ± 0.9°C, n = 6) than their acclimation temperature (T(a), 21°C). Unfed leeches preferred temperatures that were significantly cooler than ambient (12.8 ± 0.9°C, n = 6). This behavioural strategy is consistent with minimizing the time course of elevated post-feeding energy costs and reducing energy expenditure during fasting. Our observations raise the possibility that thermoregulatory behaviour of this type is an unrecognized feature of other invertebrate taxa.
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Genetic determinants of serum testosterone concentrations in men.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2011
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Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterones high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n?=?871) and two de novo replication cohorts (n?=?4,620) to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) locus (17p13-p12) were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p?=?1.2×10(-41) and rs6258, p?=?2.3×10(-22)). Subjects with ? 3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p?=?5.6×10(-16)). The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBGs affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01). Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation.
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Acclimation temperature affects the metabolic response of amphibian skeletal muscle to insulin.
Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Part A Mol. Integr. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2011
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Frog skeletal muscle mainly utilizes the substrates glucose and lactate for energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on the uptake and metabolic fate of lactate and glucose at rest in skeletal muscle of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeiana, under varying temperature regimens. We hypothesize that lactate and glucose metabolic pathways will respond differently to the presence of insulin in cold versus warm acclimated frog tissues, suggesting an interaction between temperature and metabolism under varying environmental conditions. We employed radiolabeled tracer techniques to measure in vitro uptake, oxidation, and incorporation of glucose and lactate into glycogen by isolated muscles from bullfrogs acclimated to 5 °C (cold) or 25 °C (warm). Isolated bundles from Sartorius muscles were incubated at 5 °C, 15 °C, or 25 °C, and in the presence and absence of 0.05 IU/mL bovine insulin. Insulin treatment in the warm acclimated and incubated frogs resulted in an increase in glucose incorporation into glycogen, and an increase in intracellular [glucose] of 0.5 ?mol/g (P<0.05). Under the same conditions lactate incorporation into glycogen was reduced (P<0.05) in insulin-treated muscle. When compared to the warm treatment group, cold acclimation and incubation resulted in increased rates of glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis, and a reduction in free intracellular glucose levels (P<0.05). When muscles from either acclimation group were incubated at an intermediate temperature of 15 °C, insulins effect on substrate metabolism was attenuated or even reversed. Therefore, a significant interaction between insulin and acclimation condition in controlling skeletal muscle metabolism appears to exist. Our findings further suggest that one of insulins actions in frog muscle is to increase glucose incorporation into glycogen, and to reduce reliance on lactate as the primary metabolic fuel.
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A genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) are involved in cell replication, proliferation, differentiation, protein synthesis, carbohydrate homeostasis and bone metabolism. Circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations predict anthropometric traits and risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. In a genome-wide association study of 10 280 middle-aged and older men and women from four community-based cohort studies, we confirmed a known association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the IGFBP3 gene region on chromosome 7p12.3 with IGFBP-3 concentrations using a significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8) (P = 3.3 × 10(-101)). Furthermore, the same IGFBP3 gene locus (e.g. rs11977526) that was associated with IGFBP-3 concentrations was also associated with the opposite direction of effect, with IGF-I concentration after adjustment for IGFBP-3 concentration (P = 1.9 × 10(-26)). A novel and independent locus on chromosome 7p12.3 (rs700752) had genome-wide significant associations with higher IGFBP-3 (P = 4.4 × 10(-21)) and higher IGF-I (P = 4.9 × 10(-9)) concentrations; when the two measurements were adjusted for one another, the IGF-I association was attenuated but the IGFBP-3 association was not. Two additional loci demonstrated genome-wide significant associations with IGFBP-3 concentration (rs1065656, chromosome 16p13.3, P = 1.2 × 10(-11), IGFALS, a confirmatory finding; and rs4234798, chromosome 4p16.1, P = 4.5 × 10(-10), SORCS2, a novel finding). Together, the four genome-wide significant loci explained 6.5% of the population variation in IGFBP-3 concentration. Furthermore, we observed a borderline statistically significant association between IGF-I concentration and FOXO3 (rs2153960, chromosome 6q21, P = 5.1 × 10(-7)), a locus associated with longevity. These genetic loci deserve further investigation to elucidate the biological basis for the observed associations and clarify their possible role in IGF-mediated regulation of cell growth and metabolism.
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Common genetic variants associate with serum phosphorus concentration.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2010
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Phosphorus is an essential mineral that maintains cellular energy and mineralizes the skeleton. Because complex actions of ion transporters and regulatory hormones regulate serum phosphorus concentrations, genetic variation may determine interindividual variation in phosphorus metabolism. Here, we report a comprehensive genome-wide association study of serum phosphorus concentration. We evaluated 16,264 participants of European ancestry from the Cardiovascular Heath Study, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, Framingham Offspring Study, and the Rotterdam Study. We excluded participants with an estimated GFR <45 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) to focus on phosphorus metabolism under normal conditions. We imputed genotypes to approximately 2.5 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the HapMap and combined study-specific findings using meta-analysis. We tested top polymorphisms from discovery cohorts in a 5444-person replication sample. Polymorphisms in seven loci with minor allele frequencies 0.08 to 0.49 associate with serum phosphorus concentration (P = 3.5 x 10(-16) to 3.6 x 10(-7)). Three loci were near genes encoding the kidney-specific type IIa sodium phosphate co-transporter (SLC34A1), the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), proteins that contribute to phosphorus metabolism. We also identified genes encoding phosphatases, kinases, and phosphodiesterases that have yet-undetermined roles in phosphorus homeostasis. In the replication sample, five of seven top polymorphisms associate with serum phosphorous concentrations (P < 0.05 for each). In conclusion, common genetic variants associate with serum phosphorus in the general population. Further study of the loci identified in this study may help elucidate mechanisms of phosphorus regulation.
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Novel hexahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole CCR5 antagonists.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2010
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Starting with a high-throughput screening lead, a novel series of CCR5 antagonists was developed utilizing an information-based approach. Improvement of pharmacokinetic properties for the series was pursued by SAR exploration of the lead template. The synthesis, SAR and biological profiles of the series are described.
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Exploration of a new series of CCR5 antagonists: multi-dimensional optimization of a sub-series containing N-substituted pyrazoles.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2010
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The introduction of N-substituted pyrazoles in a new series of CCR5 antagonists was shown to substantially increase antiviral activity.
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Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis.
Benjamin F Voight, Laura J Scott, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, Andrew P Morris, Christian Dina, Ryan P Welch, Eleftheria Zeggini, Cornelia Huth, Yurii S Aulchenko, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Laura J McCulloch, Teresa Ferreira, Harald Grallert, Najaf Amin, Guanming Wu, Cristen J Willer, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Steve A McCarroll, Claudia Langenberg, Oliver M Hofmann, Josée Dupuis, Lu Qi, Ayellet V Segrè, Mandy van Hoek, Pau Navarro, Kristin Ardlie, Beverley Balkau, Rafn Benediktsson, Amanda J Bennett, Roza Blagieva, Eric Boerwinkle, Lori L Bonnycastle, Kristina Bengtsson Boström, Bert Bravenboer, Suzannah Bumpstead, Noisël P Burtt, Guillaume Charpentier, Peter S Chines, Marilyn Cornelis, David J Couper, Gabe Crawford, Alex S F Doney, Katherine S Elliott, Amanda L Elliott, Michael R Erdos, Caroline S Fox, Christopher S Franklin, Martha Ganser, Christian Gieger, Niels Grarup, Todd Green, Simon Griffin, Christopher J Groves, Candace Guiducci, Samy Hadjadj, Neelam Hassanali, Christian Herder, Bo Isomaa, Anne U Jackson, Paul R V Johnson, Torben Jørgensen, Wen H L Kao, Norman Klopp, Augustine Kong, Peter Kraft, Johanna Kuusisto, Torsten Lauritzen, Man Li, Aloysius Lieverse, Cecilia M Lindgren, Valeriya Lyssenko, Michel Marre, Thomas Meitinger, Kristian Midthjell, Mario A Morken, Narisu Narisu, Peter Nilsson, Katharine R Owen, Felicity Payne, John R B Perry, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Carl Platou, Christine Proença, Inga Prokopenko, Wolfgang Rathmann, N William Rayner, Neil R Robertson, Ghislain Rocheleau, Michael Roden, Michael J Sampson, Richa Saxena, Beverley M Shields, Peter Shrader, Gunnar Sigurdsson, Thomas Sparsø, Klaus Straßburger, Heather M Stringham, Qi Sun, Amy J Swift, Barbara Thorand, Jean Tichet, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Rob M Van Dam, Timon W van Haeften, Thijs van Herpt, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, G Bragi Walters, Michael N Weedon, Cisca Wijmenga, Jacqueline Witteman, Richard N Bergman, Stéphane Cauchi, Francis S Collins, Anna L Gloyn, Ulf Gyllensten, Torben Hansen, Winston A Hide, Graham A Hitman, Albert Hofman, David J Hunter, Kristian Hveem, Markku Laakso, Karen L Mohlke, Andrew D Morris, Colin N A Palmer, Peter P Pramstaller, Igor Rudan, Eric Sijbrands, Lincoln D Stein, Jaakko Tuomilehto, André Uitterlinden, Mark Walker, Nicholas J Wareham, Richard M Watanabe, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Bernhard O Boehm, Harry Campbell, Mark J Daly, Andrew T Hattersley, Frank B Hu, James B Meigs, James S Pankow, Oluf Pedersen, H-Erich Wichmann, Inês Barroso, Jose C Florez, Timothy M Frayling, Leif Groop, Rob Sladek, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, James F Wilson, Thomas Illig, Philippe Froguel, Cornelia M van Duijn, Kari Stefansson, David Altshuler, Michael Boehnke, Mark I McCarthy, .
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
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By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combined P<5x10(-8). These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of overlap between loci implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes (at HNF1A). The identified loci affect both beta-cell function and insulin action, and, overall, T2D association signals show evidence of enrichment for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also show that a high proportion of T2D susceptibility loci harbor independent association signals influencing apparently unrelated complex traits.
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Evaluation of a 4-aminopiperidine replacement in several series of CCR5 antagonists.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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The bicyclic 5-amino-3-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octanes were shown to be effective replacements for the conformationally restricted 4-aminopiperidine ring found in several series of CCR5 antagonists.
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Evaluation of a 3-amino-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane replacement in the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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The bicyclic 5-amino-3-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octanes were shown to be effective replacements for the 3-amino-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane found in the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc.
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Evaluation of secondary amide replacements in a series of CCR5 antagonists as a means to increase intrinsic membrane permeability. Part 1: Optimization of gem-disubstituted azacycles.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2009
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Replacement of a secondary amide with an N-acyl or N-sulfonyl gem-disubstituted azacyle in a series of CCR5 antagonists led to the identification of compounds with excellent in vitro HIV antiviral activity and increased intrinsic membrane permeability.
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A genome-wide association meta-analysis of circulating sex hormone-binding globulin reveals multiple Loci implicated in sex steroid hormone regulation.
Andrea D Coviello, Robin Haring, Melissa Wellons, Dhananjay Vaidya, Terho Lehtimäki, Sarah Keildson, Kathryn L Lunetta, Chunyan He, Myriam Fornage, Vasiliki Lagou, Massimo Mangino, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Brian Chen, Joel Eriksson, Melissa Garcia, Yong Mei Liu, Annemarie Koster, Kurt Lohman, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Jennifer Prescott, Lisette Stolk, Liesbeth Vandenput, Andrew R Wood, Wei Vivian Zhuang, Aimo Ruokonen, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Anneli Pouta, Stefania Bandinelli, Reiner Biffar, Georg Brabant, David G Cox, Yuhui Chen, Steven Cummings, Luigi Ferrucci, Marc J Gunter, Susan E Hankinson, Hannu Martikainen, Albert Hofman, Georg Homuth, Thomas Illig, John-Olov Jansson, Andrew D Johnson, David Karasik, Magnus Karlsson, Johannes Kettunen, Douglas P Kiel, Peter Kraft, Jingmin Liu, Osten Ljunggren, Mattias Lorentzon, Marcello Maggio, Marcello R P Markus, Dan Mellström, Iva Miljkovic, Daniel Mirel, Sarah Nelson, Laure Morin Papunen, Petra H M Peeters, Inga Prokopenko, Leslie Raffel, Martin Reincke, Alex P Reiner, Kathryn Rexrode, Fernando Rivadeneira, Stephen M Schwartz, David Siscovick, Nicole Soranzo, Doris Stöckl, Shelley Tworoger, André G Uitterlinden, Carla H van Gils, Ramachandran S Vasan, H-Erich Wichmann, Guangju Zhai, Shalender Bhasin, Martin Bidlingmaier, Stephen J Chanock, Immaculata De Vivo, Tamara B Harris, David J Hunter, Mika Kähönen, Simin Liu, Pamela Ouyang, Tim D Spector, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Jorma Viikari, Henri Wallaschofski, Mark I McCarthy, Timothy M Frayling, Anna Murray, Steve Franks, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Frank H de Jong, Olli Raitakari, Alexander Teumer, Claes Ohlsson, Joanne M Murabito, John R B Perry.
PLoS Genet.
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Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs) associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8 × 10(-106)), PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4 × 10(-11)), GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2 × 10(-16)), ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4 × 10(-09)), JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1 × 10(-35)), SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9 × 10(-08)), NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3 × 10(-12)), ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5 × 10(-14)), TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1 × 10(-14)), LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3 × 10(-07)), BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7 × 10(-08)), and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5 × 10(-06)). These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5 × 10(-08), women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003). Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG gene that together almost double the proportion of variance explained at the locus. Using an independent study of 1,129 individuals, all SNPs identified in the overall or sex-differentiated or conditional analyses explained ~15.6% and ~8.4% of the genetic variation of SHBG concentrations in men and women, respectively. The evidence for sex-differentiated effects and allelic heterogeneity highlight the importance of considering these features when estimating complex trait variance.
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Body fat free mass is associated with the serum metabolite profile in a population-based study.
PLoS ONE
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To characterise the influence of the fat free mass on the metabolite profile in serum samples from participants of the population-based KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) S4 study.
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Stratifying type 2 diabetes cases by BMI identifies genetic risk variants in LAMA1 and enrichment for risk variants in lean compared to obese cases.
PLoS Genet.
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Common diseases such as type 2 diabetes are phenotypically heterogeneous. Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but patients vary appreciably in body mass index. We hypothesized that the genetic predisposition to the disease may be different in lean (BMI<25 Kg/m²) compared to obese cases (BMI?30 Kg/m²). We performed two case-control genome-wide studies using two accepted cut-offs for defining individuals as overweight or obese. We used 2,112 lean type 2 diabetes cases (BMI<25 kg/m²) or 4,123 obese cases (BMI?30 kg/m²), and 54,412 un-stratified controls. Replication was performed in 2,881 lean cases or 8,702 obese cases, and 18,957 un-stratified controls. To assess the effects of known signals, we tested the individual and combined effects of SNPs representing 36 type 2 diabetes loci. After combining data from discovery and replication datasets, we identified two signals not previously reported in Europeans. A variant (rs8090011) in the LAMA1 gene was associated with type 2 diabetes in lean cases (P?=?8.4×10??, OR?=?1.13 [95% CI 1.09-1.18]), and this association was stronger than that in obese cases (P?=?0.04, OR?=?1.03 [95% CI 1.00-1.06]). A variant in HMG20A--previously identified in South Asians but not Europeans--was associated with type 2 diabetes in obese cases (P?=?1.3×10??, OR?=?1.11 [95% CI 1.07-1.15]), although this association was not significantly stronger than that in lean cases (P?=?0.02, OR?=?1.09 [95% CI 1.02-1.17]). For 36 known type 2 diabetes loci, 29 had a larger odds ratio in the lean compared to obese (binomial P?=?0.0002). In the lean analysis, we observed a weighted per-risk allele OR?=?1.13 [95% CI 1.10-1.17], P?=?3.2×10?¹?. This was larger than the same model fitted in the obese analysis where the OR?=?1.06 [95% CI 1.05-1.08], P?=?2.2×10?¹?. This study provides evidence that stratification of type 2 diabetes cases by BMI may help identify additional risk variants and that lean cases may have a stronger genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes.
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On the hypothesis-free testing of metabolite ratios in genome-wide and metabolome-wide association studies.
BMC Bioinformatics
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with metabolic traits and metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS) with traits of biomedical relevance are powerful tools to identify the contribution of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors to the etiology of complex diseases. Hypothesis-free testing of ratios between all possible metabolite pairs in GWAS and MWAS has proven to be an innovative approach in the discovery of new biologically meaningful associations. The p-gain statistic was introduced as an ad-hoc measure to determine whether a ratio between two metabolite concentrations carries more information than the two corresponding metabolite concentrations alone. So far, only a rule of thumb was applied to determine the significance of the p-gain.
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Novel loci for adiponectin levels and their influence on type 2 diabetes and metabolic traits: a multi-ethnic meta-analysis of 45,891 individuals.
Zari Dastani, Marie-France Hivert, Nicholas Timpson, John R B Perry, Xin Yuan, Robert A Scott, Peter Henneman, Iris M Heid, Jorge R Kizer, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Christian Fuchsberger, Toshiko Tanaka, Andrew P Morris, Kerrin Small, Aaron Isaacs, Marian Beekman, Stefan Coassin, Kurt Lohman, Lu Qi, Stavroula Kanoni, James S Pankow, Hae-Won Uh, Ying Wu, Aurelian Bidulescu, Laura J Rasmussen-Torvik, Celia M T Greenwood, Martin Ladouceur, Jonna Grimsby, Alisa K Manning, Ching-Ti Liu, Jaspal Kooner, Vincent E Mooser, Peter Vollenweider, Karen A Kapur, John Chambers, Nicholas J Wareham, Claudia Langenberg, Rune Frants, Ko Willems-Vandijk, Ben A Oostra, Sara M Willems, Claudia Lamina, Thomas W Winkler, Bruce M Psaty, Russell P Tracy, Jennifer Brody, Ida Chen, Jorma Viikari, Mika Kähönen, Peter P Pramstaller, David M Evans, Beate St Pourcain, Naveed Sattar, Andrew R Wood, Stefania Bandinelli, Olga D Carlson, Josephine M Egan, Stefan Böhringer, Diana van Heemst, Lyudmyla Kedenko, Kati Kristiansson, Marja-Liisa Nuotio, Britt-Marie Loo, Tamara Harris, Melissa Garcia, Alka Kanaya, Margot Haun, Norman Klopp, H-Erich Wichmann, Panos Deloukas, Efi Katsareli, David J Couper, Bruce B Duncan, Margreet Kloppenburg, Linda S Adair, Judith B Borja, , James G Wilson, Solomon Musani, Xiuqing Guo, Toby Johnson, Robert Semple, Tanya M Teslovich, Matthew A Allison, Susan Redline, Sarah G Buxbaum, Karen L Mohlke, Ingrid Meulenbelt, Christie M Ballantyne, George V Dedoussis, Frank B Hu, Yongmei Liu, Bernhard Paulweber, Timothy D Spector, P Eline Slagboom, Luigi Ferrucci, Antti Jula, Markus Perola, Olli Raitakari, Jose C Florez, Veikko Salomaa, Johan G Eriksson, Timothy M Frayling, Andrew A Hicks, Terho Lehtimäki, George Davey Smith, David S Siscovick, Florian Kronenberg, Cornelia van Duijn, Ruth J F Loos, Dawn M Waterworth, James B Meigs, Josée Dupuis, J Brent Richards, Benjamin F Voight, Laura J Scott, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, Christian Dina, Ryan P Welch, Eleftheria Zeggini, Cornelia Huth, Yurii S Aulchenko, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Laura J McCulloch, Teresa Ferreira, Harald Grallert, Najaf Amin, Guanming Wu, Cristen J Willer, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Steve A McCarroll, Oliver M Hofmann, Ayellet V Segrè, Mandy van Hoek, Pau Navarro, Kristin Ardlie, Beverley Balkau, Rafn Benediktsson, Amanda J Bennett, Roza Blagieva, Eric Boerwinkle, Lori L Bonnycastle, Kristina Bengtsson Boström, Bert Bravenboer, Suzannah Bumpstead, Noel P Burtt, Guillaume Charpentier, Peter S Chines, Marilyn Cornelis, Gabe Crawford, Alex S F Doney, Katherine S Elliott, Amanda L Elliott, Michael R Erdos, Caroline S Fox, Christopher S Franklin, Martha Ganser, Christian Gieger, Niels Grarup, Todd Green, Simon Griffin, Christopher J Groves, Candace Guiducci, Samy Hadjadj, Neelam Hassanali, Christian Herder, Bo Isomaa, Anne U Jackson, Paul R V Johnson, Torben Jørgensen, Wen H L Kao, Augustine Kong, Peter Kraft, Johanna Kuusisto, Torsten Lauritzen, Man Li, Aloysius Lieverse, Cecilia M Lindgren, Valeriya Lyssenko, Michel Marre, Thomas Meitinger, Kristian Midthjell, Mario A Morken, Narisu Narisu, Peter Nilsson, Katharine R Owen, Felicity Payne, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Carl Platou, Christine Proença, Inga Prokopenko, Wolfgang Rathmann, N William Rayner, Neil R Robertson, Ghislain Rocheleau, Michael Roden, Michael J Sampson, Richa Saxena, Beverley M Shields, Peter Shrader, Gunnar Sigurdsson, Thomas Sparsø, Klaus Straßburger, Heather M Stringham, Qi Sun, Amy J Swift, Barbara Thorand, Jean Tichet, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Rob M Van Dam, Timon W van Haeften, Thijs van Herpt, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, G Bragi Walters, Michael N Weedon, Cisca Wijmenga, Jacqueline Witteman, Richard N Bergman, Stéphane Cauchi, Francis S Collins, Anna L Gloyn, Ulf Gyllensten, Torben Hansen, Winston A Hide, Graham A Hitman, Albert Hofman, David J Hunter, Kristian Hveem, Markku Laakso, Andrew D Morris, Colin N A Palmer, Igor Rudan, Eric Sijbrands, Lincoln D Stein, Jaakko Tuomilehto, André Uitterlinden, Mark Walker, Richard M Watanabe, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Bernhard O Boehm, Harry Campbell, Mark J Daly, Andrew T Hattersley, Oluf Pedersen, Inês Barroso, Leif Groop, Rob Sladek, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, James F Wilson, Thomas Illig, Philippe Froguel, Cornelia M van Duijn, Kari Stefansson, David Altshuler, Michael Boehnke, Mark I McCarthy, Nicole Soranzo, Eleanor Wheeler, Nicole L Glazer, Nabila Bouatia-Naji, Reedik Mägi, Joshua Randall, Paul Elliott, Denis Rybin, Abbas Dehghan, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Kijoung Song, Anuj Goel, Taina Lajunen, Alex Doney, Christine Cavalcanti-Proença, Meena Kumari, Nicholas J Timpson, Carina Zabena, Erik Ingelsson, Ping An, Jeffrey O'Connell, Jian'an Luan, Amanda Elliott, Steven A McCarroll, Rosa Maria Roccasecca, François Pattou, Praveen Sethupathy, Yavuz Ariyurek, Philip Barter, John P Beilby, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Sven Bergmann, Murielle Bochud, Amélie Bonnefond, Knut Borch-Johnsen, Yvonne Böttcher, Eric Brunner, Suzannah J Bumpstead, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Peter Chines, Robert Clarke, Lachlan J M Coin, Matthew N Cooper, Laura Crisponi, Ian N M Day, Eco J C de Geus, Jérôme Delplanque, Annette C Fedson, Antje Fischer-Rosinský, Nita G Forouhi, Maria Grazia Franzosi, Pilar Galán, Mark O Goodarzi, Jurgen Graessler, Scott Grundy, Rhian Gwilliam, Göran Hallmans, Naomi Hammond, Xijing Han, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Simon C Heath, Serge Hercberg, David R Hillman, Aroon D Hingorani, Jennie Hui, Joe Hung, Marika Kaakinen, Jaakko Kaprio, Y Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Beatrice Knight, Seppo Koskinen, Peter Kovacs, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, G Mark Lathrop, Debbie A Lawlor, Olivier Le Bacquer, Cécile Lecoeur, Yun Li, Robert Mahley, Massimo Mangino, María Teresa Martínez-Larrad, Jarred B McAteer, Ruth McPherson, Christa Meisinger, David Melzer, David Meyre, Braxton D Mitchell, Sutapa Mukherjee, Silvia Naitza, Matthew J Neville, Marco Orrù, Ruth Pakyz, Giuseppe Paolisso, Cristian Pattaro, Daniel Pearson, John F Peden, Nancy L Pedersen, Andreas F H Pfeiffer, Irene Pichler, Ozren Polašek, Danielle Posthuma, Simon C Potter, Anneli Pouta, Michael A Province, Nigel W Rayner, Kenneth Rice, Samuli Ripatti, Fernando Rivadeneira, Olov Rolandsson, Annelli Sandbaek, Manjinder Sandhu, Serena Sanna, Avan Aihie Sayer, Paul Scheet, Udo Seedorf, Stephen J Sharp, Beverley Shields, Gunnar Sigurðsson, Eric J G Sijbrands, Angela Silveira, Laila Simpson, Andrew Singleton, Nicholas L Smith, Ulla Sovio, Amy Swift, Holly Syddall, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Anke Tönjes, André G Uitterlinden, Ko Willems van Dijk, Dhiraj Varma, Sophie Visvikis-Siest, Veronique Vitart, Nicole Vogelzangs, Gérard Waeber, Peter J Wagner, Andrew Walley, Kim L Ward, Hugh Watkins, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Jaqueline C M Witteman, John W G Yarnell, Diana Zelenika, Björn Zethelius, Guangju Zhai, Jing Hua Zhao, M Carola Zillikens, Ingrid B Borecki, Pierre Meneton, Patrik K E Magnusson, David M Nathan, Gordon H Williams, Kaisa Silander, Stefan R Bornstein, Peter Schwarz, Joachim Spranger, Fredrik Karpe, Alan R Shuldiner, Cyrus Cooper, Manuel Serrano-Ríos, Lars Lind, Lyle J Palmer, Paul W Franks, Shah Ebrahim, Michael Marmot, W H Linda Kao, Peter Paul Pramstaller, Alan F Wright, Michael Stumvoll, Anders Hamsten, Thomas A Buchanan, Timo T Valle, Jerome I Rotter, Brenda W J H Penninx, Dorret I Boomsma, Antonio Cao, Angelo Scuteri, David Schlessinger, Manuela Uda, Aimo Ruokonen, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Leena Peltonen, Vincent Mooser, Robert Sladek, Kiran Musunuru, Albert V Smith, Andrew C Edmondson, Ioannis M Stylianou, Masahiro Koseki, James P Pirruccello, Daniel I Chasman, Christopher T Johansen, Sigrid W Fouchier, Gina M Peloso, Maja Barbalic, Sally L Ricketts, Joshua C Bis, Mary F Feitosa, Marju Orho-Melander, Olle Melander, Xiaohui Li, Mingyao Li, Yoon Shin Cho, Min Jin Go, Young Jin Kim, Jong-Young Lee, Taesung Park, Kyunga Kim, Xueling Sim, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Damien C Croteau-Chonka, Leslie A Lange, Joshua D Smith, Andreas Ziegler, Weihua Zhang, Robert Y L Zee, John B Whitfield, John R Thompson, Ida Surakka, Tim D Spector, Johannes H Smit, Juha Sinisalo, James Scott, Juha Saharinen, Chiara Sabatti, Lynda M Rose, Robert Roberts, Mark Rieder, Alex N Parker, Guillaume Paré, Christopher J O'Donnell, Markku S Nieminen, Deborah A Nickerson, Grant W Montgomery, Wendy McArdle, David Masson, Nicholas G Martin, Fabio Marroni, Gavin Lucas, Robert Luben, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Guillaume Lettre, Lenore J Launer, Edward G Lakatta, Reijo Laaksonen, Kirsten O Kyvik, Inke R König, Kay-Tee Khaw, Lee M Kaplan, Asa Johansson, A Cecile J W Janssens, Wilmar Igl, G Kees Hovingh, Christian Hengstenberg, Aki S Havulinna, Nicholas D Hastie, Tamara B Harris, Talin Haritunians, Alistair S Hall, Leif C Groop, Elena González, Nelson B Freimer, Jeanette Erdmann, Kenechi G Ejebe, Angela Döring, Anna F Dominiczak, Serkalem Demissie, Panagiotis Deloukas, Ulf de Faire, Gabriel Crawford, Yii-Der I Chen, Mark J Caulfield, S Matthijs Boekholdt, Themistocles L Assimes, Thomas Quertermous, Mark Seielstad, Tien Y Wong, E-Shyong Tai, Alan B Feranil, Christopher W Kuzawa, Herman A Taylor, Stacey B Gabriel, Hilma Holm, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ronald M Krauss, José M Ordovás, Patricia B Munroe, Jaspal S Kooner, Alan R Tall, Robert A Hegele, John J P Kastelein, Eric E Schadt, David P Strachan, Muredach P Reilly, Nilesh J Samani, Heribert Schunkert, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Paul M Ridker, Daniel J Rader, Sekar Kathiresan.
PLoS Genet.
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Circulating levels of adiponectin, a hormone produced predominantly by adipocytes, are highly heritable and are inversely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and other metabolic traits. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in 39,883 individuals of European ancestry to identify genes associated with metabolic disease. We identified 8 novel loci associated with adiponectin levels and confirmed 2 previously reported loci (P?=?4.5×10(-8)-1.2×10(-43)). Using a novel method to combine data across ethnicities (N?=?4,232 African Americans, N?=?1,776 Asians, and N?=?29,347 Europeans), we identified two additional novel loci. Expression analyses of 436 human adipocyte samples revealed that mRNA levels of 18 genes at candidate regions were associated with adiponectin concentrations after accounting for multiple testing (p<3×10(-4)). We next developed a multi-SNP genotypic risk score to test the association of adiponectin decreasing risk alleles on metabolic traits and diseases using consortia-level meta-analytic data. This risk score was associated with increased risk of T2D (p?=?4.3×10(-3), n?=?22,044), increased triglycerides (p?=?2.6×10(-14), n?=?93,440), increased waist-to-hip ratio (p?=?1.8×10(-5), n?=?77,167), increased glucose two hours post oral glucose tolerance testing (p?=?4.4×10(-3), n?=?15,234), increased fasting insulin (p?=?0.015, n?=?48,238), but with lower in HDL-cholesterol concentrations (p?=?4.5×10(-13), n?=?96,748) and decreased BMI (p?=?1.4×10(-4), n?=?121,335). These findings identify novel genetic determinants of adiponectin levels, which, taken together, influence risk of T2D and markers of insulin resistance.
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A genome-wide association search for type 2 diabetes genes in African Americans.
Nicholette D Palmer, Caitrin W McDonough, Pamela J Hicks, Bong H Roh, Maria R Wing, S Sandy An, Jessica M Hester, Jessica N Cooke, Meredith A Bostrom, Megan E Rudock, Matthew E Talbert, Joshua P Lewis, , Assiamira Ferrara, Lingyi Lu, Julie T Ziegler, Michèle M Sale, Jasmin Divers, Daniel Shriner, Adebowale Adeyemo, Charles N Rotimi, Maggie C Y Ng, Carl D Langefeld, Barry I Freedman, Donald W Bowden, Benjamin F Voight, Laura J Scott, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, Andrew P Morris, Christian Dina, Ryan P Welch, Eleftheria Zeggini, Cornelia Huth, Yurii S Aulchenko, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Laura J McCulloch, Teresa Ferreira, Harald Grallert, Najaf Amin, Guanming Wu, Cristen J Willer, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Steve A McCarroll, Claudia Langenberg, Oliver M Hofmann, Josée Dupuis, Lu Qi, Ayellet V Segrè, Mandy van Hoek, Pau Navarro, Kristin Ardlie, Beverley Balkau, Rafn Benediktsson, Amanda J Bennett, Roza Blagieva, Eric Boerwinkle, Lori L Bonnycastle, Kristina Bengtsson Boström, Bert Bravenboer, Suzannah Bumpstead, Noel P Burtt, Guillaume Charpentier, Peter S Chines, Marilyn Cornelis, David J Couper, Gabe Crawford, Alex S F Doney, Katherine S Elliott, Amanda L Elliott, Michael R Erdos, Caroline S Fox, Christopher S Franklin, Martha Ganser, Christian Gieger, Niels Grarup, Todd Green, Simon Griffin, Christopher J Groves, Candace Guiducci, Samy Hadjadj, Neelam Hassanali, Christian Herder, Bo Isomaa, Anne U Jackson, Paul R V Johnson, Torben Jørgensen, Wen H L Kao, Norman Klopp, Augustine Kong, Peter Kraft, Johanna Kuusisto, Torsten Lauritzen, Man Li, Aloysius Lieverse, Cecilia M Lindgren, Valeriya Lyssenko, Michel Marre, Thomas Meitinger, Kristian Midthjell, Mario A Morken, Narisu Narisu, Peter Nilsson, Katharine R Owen, Felicity Payne, John R B Perry, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Carl Platou, Christine Proença, Inga Prokopenko, Wolfgang Rathmann, N William Rayner, Neil R Robertson, Ghislain Rocheleau, Michael Roden, Michael J Sampson, Richa Saxena, Beverley M Shields, Peter Shrader, Gunnar Sigurdsson, Thomas Sparsø, Klaus Straßburger, Heather M Stringham, Qi Sun, Amy J Swift, Barbara Thorand, Jean Tichet, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Rob M Van Dam, Timon W van Haeften, Thijs van Herpt, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, G Bragi Walters, Michael N Weedon, Cisca Wijmenga, Jacqueline Witteman, Richard N Bergman, Stéphane Cauchi, Francis S Collins, Anna L Gloyn, Ulf Gyllensten, Torben Hansen, Winston A Hide, Graham A Hitman, Albert Hofman, David J Hunter, Kristian Hveem, Markku Laakso, Karen L Mohlke, Andrew D Morris, Colin N A Palmer, Peter P Pramstaller, Igor Rudan, Eric Sijbrands, Lincoln D Stein, Jaakko Tuomilehto, André Uitterlinden, Mark Walker, Nicholas J Wareham, Richard M Watanabe, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Bernhard O Boehm, Harry Campbell, Mark J Daly, Andrew T Hattersley, Frank B Hu, James B Meigs, James S Pankow, Oluf Pedersen, H-Erich Wichmann, Inês Barroso, Jose C Florez, Timothy M Frayling, Leif Groop, Rob Sladek, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, James F Wilson, Thomas Illig, Philippe Froguel, Cornelia M van Duijn, Kari Stefansson, David Altshuler, Michael Boehnke, Mark I McCarthy, Nicole Soranzo, Eleanor Wheeler, Nicole L Glazer, Nabila Bouatia-Naji, Reedik Mägi, Joshua Randall, Toby Johnson, Paul Elliott, Denis Rybin, Peter Henneman, Abbas Dehghan, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Kijoung Song, Anuj Goel, Josephine M Egan, Taina Lajunen, Alex Doney, Stavroula Kanoni, Christine Cavalcanti-Proença, Meena Kumari, Nicholas J Timpson, Carina Zabena, Erik Ingelsson, Ping An, Jeffrey O'Connell, Jian'an Luan, Amanda Elliott, Steven A McCarroll, Rosa Maria Roccasecca, François Pattou, Praveen Sethupathy, Yavuz Ariyurek, Philip Barter, John P Beilby, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Sven Bergmann, Murielle Bochud, Amélie Bonnefond, Knut Borch-Johnsen, Yvonne Böttcher, Eric Brunner, Suzannah J Bumpstead, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Peter Chines, Robert Clarke, Lachlan J M Coin, Matthew N Cooper, Laura Crisponi, Ian N M Day, Eco J C de Geus, Jérôme Delplanque, Annette C Fedson, Antje Fischer-Rosinský, Nita G Forouhi, Rune Frants, Maria Grazia Franzosi, Pilar Galán, Mark O Goodarzi, Jurgen Graessler, Scott Grundy, Rhian Gwilliam, Göran Hallmans, Naomi Hammond, Xijing Han, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Simon C Heath, Serge Hercberg, Andrew A Hicks, David R Hillman, Aroon D Hingorani, Jennie Hui, Joe Hung, Antti Jula, Marika Kaakinen, Jaakko Kaprio, Y Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Beatrice Knight, Seppo Koskinen, Peter Kovacs, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, G Mark Lathrop, Debbie A Lawlor, Olivier Le Bacquer, Cécile Lecoeur, Yun Li, Robert Mahley, Massimo Mangino, Alisa K Manning, María Teresa Martínez-Larrad, Jarred B McAteer, Ruth McPherson, Christa Meisinger, David Melzer, David Meyre, Braxton D Mitchell, Sutapa Mukherjee, Silvia Naitza, Matthew J Neville, Ben A Oostra, Marco Orrù, Ruth Pakyz, Giuseppe Paolisso, Cristian Pattaro, Daniel Pearson, John F Peden, Nancy L Pedersen, Markus Perola, Andreas F H Pfeiffer, Irene Pichler, Ozren Polašek, Danielle Posthuma, Simon C Potter, Anneli Pouta, Michael A Province, Bruce M Psaty, Nigel W Rayner, Kenneth Rice, Samuli Ripatti, Fernando Rivadeneira, Olov Rolandsson, Annelli Sandbaek, Manjinder Sandhu, Serena Sanna, Avan Aihie Sayer, Paul Scheet, Udo Seedorf, Stephen J Sharp, Beverley Shields, Eric J G Sijbrands, Angela Silveira, Laila Simpson, Andrew Singleton, Nicholas L Smith, Ulla Sovio, Amy Swift, Holly Syddall, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Toshiko Tanaka, Anke Tönjes, André G Uitterlinden, Ko Willems van Dijk, Dhiraj Varma, Sophie Visvikis-Siest, Veronique Vitart, Nicole Vogelzangs, Gérard Waeber, Peter J Wagner, Andrew Walley, Kim L Ward, Hugh Watkins, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Jaqueline C M Witteman, John W G Yarnell, Diana Zelenika, Björn Zethelius, Guangju Zhai, Jing Hua Zhao, M Carola Zillikens, Ingrid B Borecki, Ruth J F Loos, Pierre Meneton, Patrik K E Magnusson, David M Nathan, Gordon H Williams, Kaisa Silander, Veikko Salomaa, George Davey Smith, Stefan R Bornstein, Peter Schwarz, Joachim Spranger, Fredrik Karpe, Alan R Shuldiner, Cyrus Cooper, George V Dedoussis, Manuel Serrano-Ríos, Lars Lind, Lyle J Palmer, Paul W Franks, Shah Ebrahim, Michael Marmot, W H Linda Kao, Peter Paul Pramstaller, Alan F Wright, Michael Stumvoll, Anders Hamsten, Thomas A Buchanan, Timo T Valle, Jerome I Rotter, David S Siscovick, Brenda W J H Penninx, Dorret I Boomsma, Panos Deloukas, Timothy D Spector, Luigi Ferrucci, Antonio Cao, Angelo Scuteri, David Schlessinger, Manuela Uda, Aimo Ruokonen, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Dawn M Waterworth, Peter Vollenweider, Leena Peltonen, Vincent Mooser, Robert Sladek.
PLoS ONE
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African Americans are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes (T2DM) yet few studies have examined T2DM using genome-wide association approaches in this ethnicity. The aim of this study was to identify genes associated with T2DM in the African American population. We performed a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using the Affymetrix 6.0 array in 965 African-American cases with T2DM and end-stage renal disease (T2DM-ESRD) and 1029 population-based controls. The most significant SNPs (n?=?550 independent loci) were genotyped in a replication cohort and 122 SNPs (n?=?98 independent loci) were further tested through genotyping three additional validation cohorts followed by meta-analysis in all five cohorts totaling 3,132 cases and 3,317 controls. Twelve SNPs had evidence of association in the GWAS (P<0.0071), were directionally consistent in the Replication cohort and were associated with T2DM in subjects without nephropathy (P<0.05). Meta-analysis in all cases and controls revealed a single SNP reaching genome-wide significance (P<2.5×10(-8)). SNP rs7560163 (P?=?7.0×10(-9), OR (95% CI)?=?0.75 (0.67-0.84)) is located intergenically between RND3 and RBM43. Four additional loci (rs7542900, rs4659485, rs2722769 and rs7107217) were associated with T2DM (P<0.05) and reached more nominal levels of significance (P<2.5×10(-5)) in the overall analysis and may represent novel loci that contribute to T2DM. We have identified novel T2DM-susceptibility variants in the African-American population. Notably, T2DM risk was associated with the major allele and implies an interesting genetic architecture in this population. These results suggest that multiple loci underlie T2DM susceptibility in the African-American population and that these loci are distinct from those identified in other ethnic populations.
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