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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genetic variation associated with euphorigenic effects of d-amphetamine is associated with diminished risk for schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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Here, we extended our findings from a genome-wide association study of the euphoric response to d-amphetamine in healthy human volunteers by identifying enrichment between SNPs associated with response to d-amphetamine and SNPs associated with psychiatric disorders. We found that SNPs nominally associated (P ? 0.05 and P ? 0.01) with schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were also nominally associated with d-amphetamine response. Furthermore, we found that the source of this enrichment was an excess of alleles that increased sensitivity to the euphoric effects of d-amphetamine and decreased susceptibility to schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In contrast, three negative control phenotypes (height, inflammatory bowel disease, and Parkinson disease) did not show this enrichment. Taken together, our results suggest that alleles identified using an acute challenge with a dopaminergic drug in healthy individuals can be used to identify alleles that confer risk for psychiatric disorders commonly treated with dopaminergic agonists and antagonists. More importantly, our results show the use of the enrichment approach as an alternative to stringent standards for genome-wide significance and suggest a relatively novel approach to the analysis of small cohorts in which intermediate phenotypes have been measured.
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A polygenic burden of rare disruptive mutations in schizophrenia.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2014
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Schizophrenia is a common disease with a complex aetiology, probably involving multiple and heterogeneous genetic factors. Here, by analysing the exome sequences of 2,536 schizophrenia cases and 2,543 controls, we demonstrate a polygenic burden primarily arising from rare (less than 1 in 10,000), disruptive mutations distributed across many genes. Particularly enriched gene sets include the voltage-gated calcium ion channel and the signalling complex formed by the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated scaffold protein (ARC) of the postsynaptic density, sets previously implicated by genome-wide association and copy-number variation studies. Similar to reports in autism, targets of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, product of FMR1) are enriched for case mutations. No individual gene-based test achieves significance after correction for multiple testing and we do not detect any alleles of moderately low frequency (approximately 0.5 to 1 per cent) and moderately large effect. Taken together, these data suggest that population-based exome sequencing can discover risk alleles and complements established gene-mapping paradigms in neuropsychiatric disease.
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Genome-wide association analysis identifies 13 new risk loci for schizophrenia.
Stephan Ripke, Colm O'Dushlaine, Kimberly Chambert, Jennifer L Moran, Anna K Kähler, Susanne Akterin, Sarah E Bergen, Ann L Collins, James J Crowley, Menachem Fromer, Yunjung Kim, Sang Hong Lee, Patrik K E Magnusson, Nick Sanchez, Eli A Stahl, Stephanie Williams, Naomi R Wray, Kai Xia, Francesco Bettella, Anders D Borglum, Brendan K Bulik-Sullivan, Paul Cormican, Nick Craddock, Christiaan de Leeuw, Naser Durmishi, Michael Gill, Vera Golimbet, Marian L Hamshere, Peter Holmans, David M Hougaard, Kenneth S Kendler, Kuang Lin, Derek W Morris, Ole Mors, Preben B Mortensen, Benjamin M Neale, Francis A O'Neill, Michael J Owen, Milica Pejović Milovančević, Danielle Posthuma, John Powell, Alexander L Richards, Brien P Riley, Douglas Ruderfer, Dan Rujescu, Engilbert Sigurdsson, Teimuraz Silagadze, August B Smit, Hreinn Stefansson, Stacy Steinberg, Jaana Suvisaari, Sarah Tosato, Matthijs Verhage, James T Walters, , Douglas F Levinson, Pablo V Gejman, Claudine Laurent, Bryan J Mowry, Michael C O'Donovan, Ann E Pulver, Sibylle G Schwab, Dieter B Wildenauer, Frank Dudbridge, Jianxin Shi, Margot Albus, Madeline Alexander, Dominique Campion, David Cohen, Dimitris Dikeos, Jubao Duan, Peter Eichhammer, Stephanie Godard, Mark Hansen, F Bernard Lerer, Kung-Yee Liang, Wolfgang Maier, Jacques Mallet, Deborah A Nertney, Gerald Nestadt, Nadine Norton, George N Papadimitriou, Robert Ribble, Alan R Sanders, Jeremy M Silverman, Dermot Walsh, Nigel M Williams, Brandon Wormley, Maria J Arranz, Steven Bakker, Stephan Bender, Elvira Bramon, David Collier, Benedicto Crespo-Facorro, Jeremy Hall, Conrad Iyegbe, Assen Jablensky, René S Kahn, Luba Kalaydjieva, Stephen Lawrie, Cathryn M Lewis, Don H Linszen, Ignacio Mata, Andrew McIntosh, Robin M Murray, Roel A Ophoff, Jim van Os, Muriel Walshe, Matthias Weisbrod, Durk Wiersma, Peter Donnelly, Inês Barroso, Jenefer M Blackwell, Matthew A Brown, Juan P Casas, Aiden P Corvin, Panos Deloukas, Audrey Duncanson, Janusz Jankowski, Hugh S Markus, Christopher G Mathew, Colin N A Palmer, Robert Plomin, Anna Rautanen, Stephen J Sawcer, Richard C Trembath, Ananth C Viswanathan, Nicholas W Wood, Chris C A Spencer, Gavin Band, Celine Bellenguez, Colin Freeman, Garrett Hellenthal, Eleni Giannoulatou, Matti Pirinen, Richard D Pearson, Amy Strange, Zhan Su, Damjan Vukcevic, Cordelia Langford, Sarah E Hunt, Sarah Edkins, Rhian Gwilliam, Hannah Blackburn, Suzannah J Bumpstead, Serge Dronov, Matthew Gillman, Emma Gray, Naomi Hammond, Alagurevathi Jayakumar, Owen T McCann, Jennifer Liddle, Simon C Potter, Radhi Ravindrarajah, Michelle Ricketts, Avazeh Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Matthew J Waller, Paul Weston, Sara Widaa, Pamela Whittaker, Mark I McCarthy, Kari Stefansson, Edward Scolnick, Shaun Purcell, Steven A McCarroll, Pamela Sklar, Christina M Hultman, Patrick F Sullivan.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
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Schizophrenia is an idiopathic mental disorder with a heritable component and a substantial public health impact. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) for schizophrenia beginning with a Swedish national sample (5,001 cases and 6,243 controls) followed by meta-analysis with previous schizophrenia GWAS (8,832 cases and 12,067 controls) and finally by replication of SNPs in 168 genomic regions in independent samples (7,413 cases, 19,762 controls and 581 parent-offspring trios). We identified 22 loci associated at genome-wide significance; 13 of these are new, and 1 was previously implicated in bipolar disorder. Examination of candidate genes at these loci suggests the involvement of neuronal calcium signaling. We estimate that 8,300 independent, mostly common SNPs (95% credible interval of 6,300-10,200 SNPs) contribute to risk for schizophrenia and that these collectively account for at least 32% of the variance in liability. Common genetic variation has an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia, and larger studies will allow more detailed understanding of this disorder.
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Reciprocal Duplication of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome Deletion on Chromosome 7q11.23 Is Associated with Schizophrenia.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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Several copy number variants (CNVs) have been implicated as susceptibility factors for schizophrenia (SZ). Some of these same CNVs also increase risk for autism spectrum disorders, suggesting an etiologic overlap between these conditions. Recently, de novo duplications of a region on chromosome 7q11.23 were associated with autism spectrum disorders. The reciprocal deletion of this region causes Williams-Beuren syndrome.
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Comprehensive analysis of copy number variation in monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.
Schizophr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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Copy number variation plays a clear role in the etiology of many psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. We performed array-CGH to look for copy number variants between five pairs of monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Our study found no differences in copy number variants between the sets of twins. Although alluring, realistic accounting for heterogeneity and chimerism highlights the technological limitations in studying monozygotic twins discordant for psychiatric disorders.
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Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs.
, S Hong Lee, Stephan Ripke, Benjamin M Neale, Stephen V Faraone, Shaun M Purcell, Roy H Perlis, Bryan J Mowry, Anita Thapar, Michael E Goddard, John S Witte, Devin Absher, Ingrid Agartz, Huda Akil, Farooq Amin, Ole A Andreassen, Adebayo Anjorin, Richard Anney, Verneri Anttila, Dan E Arking, Philip Asherson, Maria H Azevedo, Lena Backlund, Judith A Badner, Anthony J Bailey, Tobias Banaschewski, Jack D Barchas, Michael R Barnes, Thomas B Barrett, Nicholas Bass, Agatino Battaglia, Michael Bauer, Mònica Bayés, Frank Bellivier, Sarah E Bergen, Wade Berrettini, Catalina Betancur, Thomas Bettecken, Joseph Biederman, Elisabeth B Binder, Donald W Black, Douglas H R Blackwood, Cinnamon S Bloss, Michael Boehnke, Dorret I Boomsma, Gerome Breen, René Breuer, Richard Bruggeman, Paul Cormican, Nancy G Buccola, Jan K Buitelaar, William E Bunney, Joseph D Buxbaum, William F Byerley, Enda M Byrne, Sian Caesar, Wiepke Cahn, Rita M Cantor, Miguel Casas, Aravinda Chakravarti, Kimberly Chambert, Khalid Choudhury, Sven Cichon, C Robert Cloninger, David A Collier, Edwin H Cook, Hilary Coon, Bru Cormand, Aiden Corvin, William H Coryell, David W Craig, Ian W Craig, Jennifer Crosbie, Michael L Cuccaro, David Curtis, Darina Czamara, Susmita Datta, Geraldine Dawson, Richard Day, Eco J De Geus, Franziska Degenhardt, Srdjan Djurovic, Gary J Donohoe, Alysa E Doyle, Jubao Duan, Frank Dudbridge, Eftichia Duketis, Richard P Ebstein, Howard J Edenberg, Josephine Elia, Sean Ennis, Bruno Etain, Ayman Fanous, Anne E Farmer, I Nicol Ferrier, Matthew Flickinger, Eric Fombonne, Tatiana Foroud, Josef Frank, Barbara Franke, Christine Fraser, Robert Freedman, Nelson B Freimer, Christine M Freitag, Marion Friedl, Louise Frisén, Louise Gallagher, Pablo V Gejman, Lyudmila Georgieva, Elliot S Gershon, Daniel H Geschwind, Ina Giegling, Michael Gill, Scott D Gordon, Katherine Gordon-Smith, Elaine K Green, Tiffany A Greenwood, Dorothy E Grice, Magdalena Gross, Detelina Grozeva, Weihua Guan, Hugh Gurling, Lieuwe de Haan, Jonathan L Haines, Hakon Hakonarson, Joachim Hallmayer, Steven P Hamilton, Marian L Hamshere, Thomas F Hansen, Annette M Hartmann, Martin Hautzinger, Andrew C Heath, Anjali K Henders, Stefan Herms, Ian B Hickie, Maria Hipolito, Susanne Hoefels, Peter A Holmans, Florian Holsboer, Witte J Hoogendijk, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Christina M Hultman, Vanessa Hus, Andrés Ingason, Marcus Ising, Stéphane Jamain, Edward G Jones, Ian Jones, Lisa Jones, Jung-Ying Tzeng, Anna K Kähler, René S Kahn, Radhika Kandaswamy, Matthew C Keller, James L Kennedy, Elaine Kenny, Lindsey Kent, Yunjung Kim, George K Kirov, Sabine M Klauck, Lambertus Klei, James A Knowles, Martin A Kohli, Daniel L Koller, Bettina Konte, Ania Korszun, Lydia Krabbendam, Robert Krasucki, Jonna Kuntsi, Phoenix Kwan, Mikael Landén, Niklas Långström, Mark Lathrop, Jacob Lawrence, William B Lawson, Marion Leboyer, David H Ledbetter, Phil H Lee, Todd Lencz, Klaus-Peter Lesch, Douglas F Levinson, Cathryn M Lewis, Jun Li, Paul Lichtenstein, Jeffrey A Lieberman, Dan-Yu Lin, Don H Linszen, Chunyu Liu, Falk W Lohoff, Sandra K Loo, Catherine Lord, Jennifer K Lowe, Susanne Lucae, Donald J MacIntyre, Pamela A F Madden, Elena Maestrini, Patrik K E Magnusson, Pamela B Mahon, Wolfgang Maier, Anil K Malhotra, Shrikant M Mane, Christa L Martin, Nicholas G Martin, Manuel Mattheisen, Keith Matthews, Morten Mattingsdal, Steven A McCarroll, Kevin A McGhee, James J McGough, Patrick J McGrath, Peter McGuffin, Melvin G McInnis, Andrew McIntosh, Rebecca McKinney, Alan W McLean, Francis J McMahon, William M McMahon, Andrew McQuillin, Helena Medeiros, Sarah E Medland, Sandra Meier, Ingrid Melle, Fan Meng, Jobst Meyer, Christel M Middeldorp, Lefkos Middleton, Vihra Milanova, Ana Miranda, Anthony P Monaco, Grant W Montgomery, Jennifer L Moran, Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, Gunnar Morken, Derek W Morris, Eric M Morrow, Valentina Moskvina, Pierandrea Muglia, Thomas W Mühleisen, Walter J Muir, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Michael Murtha, Richard M Myers, Inez Myin-Germeys, Michael C Neale, Stan F Nelson, Caroline M Nievergelt, Ivan Nikolov, Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, Willem A Nolen, Markus M Nöthen, John I Nurnberger, Evaristus A Nwulia, Dale R Nyholt, Colm O'Dushlaine, Robert D Oades, Ann Olincy, Guiomar Oliveira, Line Olsen, Roel A Ophoff, Urban Osby, Michael J Owen, Aarno Palotie, Jeremy R Parr, Andrew D Paterson, Carlos N Pato, Michele T Pato, Brenda W Penninx, Michele L Pergadia, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Benjamin S Pickard, Jonathan Pimm, Joseph Piven, Danielle Posthuma, James B Potash, Fritz Poustka, Peter Propping, Vinay Puri, Digby J Quested, Emma M Quinn, Josep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, Henrik B Rasmussen, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Karola Rehnström, Andreas Reif, Marta Ribasés, John P Rice, Marcella Rietschel, Kathryn Roeder, Herbert Roeyers, Lizzy Rossin, Aribert Rothenberger, Guy Rouleau, Douglas Ruderfer, Dan Rujescu, Alan R Sanders, Stephan J Sanders, Susan L Santangelo, Joseph A Sergeant, Russell Schachar, Martin Schalling, Alan F Schatzberg, William A Scheftner, Gerard D Schellenberg, Stephen W Scherer, Nicholas J Schork, Thomas G Schulze, Johannes Schumacher, Markus Schwarz, Edward Scolnick, Laura J Scott, Jianxin Shi, Paul D Shilling, Stanley I Shyn, Jeremy M Silverman, Susan L Slager, Susan L Smalley, Johannes H Smit, Erin N Smith, Edmund J S Sonuga-Barke, David St Clair, Matthew State, Michael Steffens, Hans-Christoph Steinhausen, John S Strauss, Jana Strohmaier, T Scott Stroup, James S Sutcliffe, Peter Szatmari, Szabocls Szelinger, Srinivasa Thirumalai, Robert C Thompson, Alexandre A Todorov, Federica Tozzi, Jens Treutlein, Manfred Uhr, Edwin J C G van den Oord, Gerard van Grootheest, Jim van Os, Astrid M Vicente, Veronica J Vieland, John B Vincent, Peter M Visscher, Christopher A Walsh, Thomas H Wassink, Stanley J Watson, Myrna M Weissman, Thomas Werge, Thomas F Wienker, Ellen M Wijsman, Gonneke Willemsen, Nigel Williams, A Jeremy Willsey, Stephanie H Witt, Wei Xu, Allan H Young, Timothy W Yu, Stanley Zammit, Peter P Zandi, Peng Zhang, Frans G Zitman, Sebastian Zöllner, Bernie Devlin, John R Kelsoe, Pamela Sklar, Mark J Daly, Michael C O'Donovan, Nicholas Craddock, Patrick F Sullivan, Jordan W Smoller, Kenneth S Kendler, Naomi R Wray.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2013
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Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17-29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 ± 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 ± 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 ± 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 ± 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 ± 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohns disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders.
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Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimers disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.
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Association analysis of ANK3 gene variants in nordic bipolar disorder and schizophrenia case-control samples.
Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2011
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Genetic variants in ankyrin 3 (ANK3) have recently been shown to be associated with bipolar disorder (BD). We genotyped three ANK3 SNPs previously found to be associated with BD (rs10994336, rs1938526, and rs9804190) in a Scandinavian BD case-control sample (N = 854/2,614). Due to evidence of genetic overlap between BD and schizophrenia (SZ), we also genotyped these three SNPs in a Scandinavian SZ case-control sample (N = 1,073/2,919). Combining our Scandinavian samples with an Icelandic sample (N = 435 BD cases, 651 SZ cases, and 11,491 healthy controls), we found rs10994336 and rs9804190 to be nominally significantly associated with BD in this combined Nordic BD sample (N = 1,289/14,105). Nominal P was 0.015/0.018 (fixed/random effect) for rs10994336 (Bonferroni corrected P = 0.044/0.053) and 0.023 for rs9804190 (Bonferroni corrected P = 0.069). None of the SNPs were significantly associated with SZ in the combined Nordic SZ case-control sample (N = 1,724/14,410). These results further support that ANK3 is a susceptibility gene specific to BD and that more than one risk locus is involved.
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Dystrobrevin-binding protein 1 gene (DTNBP1) variants associated with cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations in healthy volunteers.
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
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The dystrobrevin binding protein-1 (DTNBP1) gene encodes dysbindin-1, a protein involved in neurodevelopmental and neurochemical processes related mainly to the monoamine dopamine. We investigated possible associations between eleven DTNBP1 polymorphisms and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the major dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA), the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and the major noradrenaline metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) in healthy human subjects (n=132). Two polymorphisms, rs2619538 and rs760666, were nominally associated with CSF HVA and 5-HIAA concentrations, whereas a third polymorphism, rs909706, showed association only with HVA. After correction for multiple testing only the associations between rs2619538 and HVA and 5-HIAA concentrations remained significant. No significant association was found between any of the investigated DTNBP1 polymorphisms and CSF MHPG concentrations. The results suggest that genetic variation in DTNBP1 gene affects the regulation of dopamine and serotonin turnover in the central nervous system of healthy volunteers.
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Association analysis of PALB2 and BRCA2 in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in a scandinavian case-control sample.
Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2010
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A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) found significant association between the PALB2 SNP rs420259 and bipolar disorder (BD). The intracellular functions of the expressed proteins from the breast cancer risk genes PALB2 and BRCA2 are closely related. Therefore, we investigated the relation between genetic variants in PALB2 and BRCA2 and BD. Due to increasing evidence of genetic overlap between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ), we also investigated association with SCZ. In a Scandinavian case-control sample (n?=?686/2,538) we found the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 to be significantly associated with BD (Nominal P?=?0.00043). Additionally, we replicated the association between PALB2 SNP rs420259 and BD (Nominal P?=?0.025). We then combined our sample with another Nordic case-control sample (n?=?435/11,491) from Iceland, and added results from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) (n?=?1,868/2,938) and the STEP-UCL/ED-DUB-STEP2 study (n?=?2,558/3,274) in a meta-analysis which revealed a P-value of 1.2?×?10(-5) for association between PALB2 SNP rs420259 and BD (n?=?5,547/20,241). Neither the PALB2 SNP rs420259 nor the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 were nominally significantly associated with the SCZ phenotype in our Scandinavian sample (n?=?781/2,839). Our findings support PALB2 and BRCA2 as risk genes specifically for BD, and suggest that altered DNA repair related to neurogenesis may be involved in BD pathophysiology. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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Candidate gene analysis of the human natural killer-1 carbohydrate pathway and perineuronal nets in schizophrenia: B3GAT2 is associated with disease risk and cortical surface area.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2010
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The Human Natural Killer-1 carbohydrate (HNK-1) is involved in neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity. Extracellular matrix structures called perineuronal nets, condensed around subsets of neurons and proximal dendrites during brain maturation, regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity.
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SRD5A2 is associated with increased cortisol metabolism in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2010
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Dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is documented in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, but the mechanism is unclear; recently, increased activity of cortisol metabolizing enzymes was indicated in these disorders. We investigated whether five genes involved in cortisol metabolism were associated with altered activity of cortisol metabolizing enzymes in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SCZ).
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Gene variants associated with schizophrenia in a Norwegian genome-wide study are replicated in a large European cohort.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia in a Norwegian discovery sample of 201 cases and 305 controls (TOP study) with a focused replication analysis in a larger European sample of 2663 cases and 13,780 control subjects (SGENE-plus study). Firstly, the discovery sample was genotyped with Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 and 572,888 markers were tested for schizophrenia association. No SNPs in the discovery sample attained genome-wide significance (P<8.7 x 10(-8)). Secondly, based on the GWAS data, we selected 1000 markers with the lowest P values in the discovery TOP sample, and tested these (or HapMap-based surrogates) for association in the replication sample. Sixteen loci were associated with schizophrenia (nominal P value<0.05 and concurring OR) in the replication sample. As a next step, we performed a combined analysis of the findings from these two studies, and the strongest evidence for association with schizophrenia was provided for markers rs7045881 on 9p21, rs433598 on 16p12 and rs10761482 on 10q21. The markers are located in PLAA, ACSM1 and ANK3, respectively. PLAA has not previously been described as a susceptibility gene, but 9p21 is implied as a schizophrenia linkage region. ACSM1 has been identified as a susceptibility gene in a previous schizophrenia GWAS study. The association of ANK3 with schizophrenia is intriguing in light of recent associations of ANK3 with bipolar disorder, thereby supporting the hypothesis of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between these psychopathological entities.
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Sex-dependent association of common variants of microcephaly genes with brain structure.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2009
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Loss-of-function mutations in the genes associated with primary microcephaly (MCPH) reduce human brain size by about two-thirds, without producing gross abnormalities in brain organization or physiology and leaving other organs largely unaffected [Woods CG, et al. (2005) Am J Hum Genet 76:717-728]. There is also evidence suggesting that MCPH genes have evolved rapidly in primates and humans and have been subjected to selection in recent human evolution [Vallender EJ, et al. (2008) Trends Neurosci 31:637-644]. Here, we show that common variants of MCPH genes account for some of the common variation in brain structure in humans, independently of disease status. We investigated the correlations of SNPs from four MCPH genes with brain morphometry phenotypes obtained with MRI. We found significant, sex-specific associations between common, nonexonic, SNPs of the genes CDK5RAP2, MCPH1, and ASPM, with brain volume or cortical surface area in an ethnically homogenous Norwegian discovery sample (n = 287), including patients with mental illness. The most strongly associated SNP findings were replicated in an independent North American sample (n = 656), which included patients with dementia. These results are consistent with the view that common variation in brain structure is associated with genetic variants located in nonexonic, presumably regulatory, regions.
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No association between DGKH and bipolar disorder in a Scandinavian case-control sample.
Psychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2009
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Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH) have recently been shown to be associated with bipolar disorder (BD). To replicate this finding, we carried out a gene-wide genotyping of 36 tagSNPs in DGKH and performed a population-based association study on two Scandinavian samples, with successful genotyping of 594 BD cases and 1421 healthy controls. We found no significant association after multiple-testing correction between any of these SNPs and BD in our sample. Thus, it is unlikely that these genetic variations confer susceptibility to BD in this large Scandinavian sample.
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Association of MCTP2 gene variants with schizophrenia in three independent samples of Scandinavian origin (SCOPE).
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2009
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The MCTP2 gene is involved in intercellular signal transduction and synapse function. We genotyped 37 tagging SNPs across the MCTP2 gene to study a possible association with schizophrenia in three independent Scandinavian samples. We report, for the first time, a possible involvement of MCTP2 as a potential novel susceptibility gene for schizophrenia.
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Evidence for a possible association of neurotrophin receptor (NTRK-3) gene polymorphisms with hippocampal function and schizophrenia.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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Altered neurodevelopment and plasticity are implicated in schizophrenia pathology. Based on the important role of neurotrophic factors in brain development and plasticity as well as their extensive expression in hippocampal areas, we hypothesized that a variation in the neurotrophin receptor 3 gene (NTRK-3) is associated to hippocampal function and schizophrenia. Thirty-three tagging NTRK-3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 839 schizophrenia patients and 1473 healthy controls. SNPs that were significantly associated with schizophrenia were evaluated in subgroups of the sample with neuropsychological test battery (n=104 patients and 175 controls) and functional magnetic resonance imaging tests of hippocampal function (n=36 controls). rs999905 was nominally significantly associated with schizophrenia and the haplotype block that included markers rs999905 and rs4887348 remained significant after permutation tests. These gene variants are also related to in vivo brain function in healthy control subjects, shown by a significant association with hippocampal activation during an encoding task. The present results, although not robust, suggest that the NTRK-3 gene influences hippocampal function and may modify the risk for schizophrenia.
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Effect of DISC1 SNPs on brain structure in healthy controls and patients with a history of psychosis.
Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet.
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Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been suggested as a susceptibility locus for a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Risk variants have been associated with brain structural changes, which overlap alterations reported in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. We used genome-wide genotyping data for a Norwegian sample of healthy controls (n = 171) and patients with a history of psychosis (n = 184), to investigate 61 SNPs in the DISC1 region for putative association with structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) measures (hippocampal volume; mean cortical thickness; and total surface area, as well as cortical thickness and area divided into four lobar measures). SNP rs821589 was associated with mean temporal and total brain cortical thickness in controls (P(adjusted) = 0.009 and 0.02, respectively), but not in patients. SNPs rs11122319 and rs1417584 were associated with mean temporal cortical thickness in patients (P(adjusted) = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively), but not in controls, and both SNPs have previously been highly associated with DISC1 gene expression. There were significant genotype?×? case-control interactions. There was no significant association between SNPs and cortical area or hippocampal volume in controls, or with any of the structural measures in cases, after correction for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, DISC1 SNPs might impact brain structural variation, possibly differently in psychosis patients versus controls, but independent replication will be needed to confirm our findings.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.