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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Arginyltransferase ATE1 catalyzes midchain arginylation of proteins at side chain carboxylates in vivo.
Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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Arginylation is an emerging posttranslational modification mediated by Arg-tRNA-protein-transferase (ATE1). It is believed that ATE1 links Arg solely to the N terminus of proteins, requiring prior proteolysis or action by Met-aminopeptidases to expose the arginylated site. Here, we tested the possibility of Arg linkage to midchain sites within intact protein targets and found that many proteins in vivo are modified on the side chains of Asp and Glu by unconventional chemistry that targets the carboxy rather than the amino groups at the target sites. Such arginylation appears to be functionally regulated, and it can be directly mediated by ATE1, in addition to the more conventional ATE1-mediated linkage of Arg to the N-terminal alpha amino group. This midchain arginylation implies an unconventional mechanism of ATE1 action that likely facilitates its major biological role.
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Protein arginylation, a global biological regulator that targets actin cytoskeleton and the muscle.
Anat Rec (Hoboken)
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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Posttranslational addition of Arg to proteins, mediated by arginyltransferase ATE1 has been first observed in 1963 and remained poorly understood for decades since its original discovery. Recent work demonstrated the global nature of arginylation and its essential role in multiple physiological pathways during embryogenesis and adulthood and identified over a hundred of proteins arginylated in vivo. Among these proteins, the prominent role belongs to the actin cytoskeleton and the muscle, and follow up studies strongly suggests that arginylation constitutes a novel biological regulator of contractility. This review presents an overview of the studies of protein arginylation that led to the discovery of its major role in the muscle.
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Arginylation of myosin heavy chain regulates skeletal muscle strength.
Cell Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2014
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Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm) promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.
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Loss of ATE1-mediated arginylation leads to impaired platelet myosin phosphorylation, clot retraction, and in vivo thrombosis formation.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2013
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Protein arginylation by arginyl-transfer RNA protein transferase (ATE1) is emerging as a regulator protein function that is reminiscent of phosphorylation. For example, arginylation of ?-actin has been found to regulate lamellipodial formation at the leading edge in fibroblasts. This finding suggests that similar functions of ?-actin in other cell types may also require arginylation. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that ATE1 regulates the cytoskeletal dynamics essential for in vivo platelet adhesion and thrombus formation. To test this hypothesis, we generated conditional knockout mice specifically lacking ATE1 in their platelets and in their megakaryocytes and analyzed the role of arginylation during platelet activation. Surprisingly, rather than finding an impairment of the actin cytoskeleton structure and its rearrangement during platelet activation, we observed that the platelet-specific ATE1 knockout led to enhanced clot retraction and in vivo thrombus formation. This effect might be regulated by myosin II contractility since it was accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain on Ser19, which is an event that activates myosin in vivo. Furthermore, ATE1 and myosin co-immunoprecipitate from platelet lysates. This finding suggests that these proteins directly interact within platelets. These results provide the first evidence that arginylation is involved in phosphorylation-dependent protein regulation, and that arginylation affects myosin function in platelets during clot retraction.
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Contractility of myofibrils from the heart and diaphragm muscles measured with atomic force cantilevers: effects of heart-specific deletion of arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2013
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Contractile properties of myofibrils from the myocardium and diaphragm in chronic heart failure are not well understood. We investigated myofibrils in a knockout (KO) mouse model with cardiac-specific deletion of arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase (?-MHCAte1), which presents dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.
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Sounds of silence: synonymous nucleotides as a key to biological regulation and complexity.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2013
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Messenger RNA is a key component of an intricate regulatory network of its own. It accommodates numerous nucleotide signals that overlap protein coding sequences and are responsible for multiple levels of regulation and generation of biological complexity. A wealth of structural and regulatory information, which mRNA carries in addition to the encoded amino acid sequence, raises the question of how these signals and overlapping codes are delineated along non-synonymous and synonymous positions in protein coding regions, especially in eukaryotes. Silent or synonymous codon positions, which do not determine amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins, define mRNA secondary structure and stability and affect the rate of translation, folding and post-translational modifications of nascent polypeptides. The RNA level selection is acting on synonymous sites in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes and is more common than previously thought. Selection pressure on the coding gene regions follows three-nucleotide periodic pattern of nucleotide base-pairing in mRNA, which is imposed by the genetic code. Synonymous positions of the coding regions have a higher level of hybridization potential relative to non-synonymous positions, and are multifunctional in their regulatory and structural roles. Recent experimental evidence and analysis of mRNA structure and interspecies conservation suggest that there is an evolutionary tradeoff between selective pressure acting at the RNA and protein levels. Here we provide a comprehensive overview of the studies that define the role of silent positions in regulating RNA structure and processing that exert downstream effects on proteins and their functions.
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Arginylation and methylation double up to regulate nuclear proteins and nuclear architecture in vivo.
Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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Protein arginylation and arginine methylation are two posttranslational modifications of emerging importance that involve Arg residues and their modifications. To test a hypothesis that posttranslationally added arginines can be methylated, we used high-precision mass spectrometry and metabolic labeling to find whether posttranslationally added arginines can serve as methylation sites. We identified a number of proteins in vivo, on which posttranslationally added Arg have undergone mono- and dimethylation. This double modification predominantly affects the chromatin-containing nuclear fraction and likely plays an important regulatory role in chromatin-associated proteins. Moreover, inhibition of arginylation and Arg methylation results in a significant reduction of the nucleus size in cultured cells, suggesting changes in chromatin compaction and nuclear architecture. Our findings suggest a functional link between protein regulation by arginylation and methylation that affects nuclear structure in vivo.
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Posttranslational arginylation as a global biological regulator.
Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
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Posttranslational modifications constitute a major field of emerging biological significance as mounting evidence demonstrates their key role in multiple physiological processes. Following in the footsteps of protein phosphorylation studies, new modifications are being shown to regulate protein properties and functions in vivo. Among such modifications, an important role belongs to protein arginylation - posttranslational tRNA-mediated addition of arginine, to proteins by arginyltransferase, ATE1. Recent studies show that arginylation is essential for embryogenesis in many organisms and that it regulates such important processes as heart development, angiogenesis, and tissue morphogenesis in mammals. This review summarizes the key data in the protein arginylation field since its original discovery to date.
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Arginyltransferase is an ATP-independent self-regulating enzyme that forms distinct functional complexes in vivo.
Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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Posttranslational arginylation mediated by arginyl transferase (ATE1) plays an important role in cardiovascular development, cell motility, and regulation of cytoskeleton and metabolic enzymes. This protein modification was discovered decades ago, however, the arginylation reaction and the functioning of ATE1 remained poorly understood because of the lack of good biochemical models. Here, we report the development of an in vitro arginylation system, in which ATE1 function and molecular requirements can be tested using purified recombinant ATE1 isoforms supplemented with a controlled number of components. Our results show that arginylation reaction is a self-sufficient, ATP-independent process that can affect different sites in a polypeptide and that arginyl transferases form different molecular complexes in vivo, associate with components of the translation machinery, and have distinct, partially overlapping subsets of substrates, suggesting that these enzymes play different physiological functions.
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Differential arginylation of actin isoforms is regulated by coding sequence-dependent degradation.
Science
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2010
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The mammalian cytoskeletal proteins ?- and ?-actin are highly homologous, but only ?-actin is amino-terminally arginylated in vivo, which regulates its function. We examined the metabolic fate of exogenously expressed arginylated and nonarginylated actin isoforms. Arginylated ?-actin, unlike ?-, was highly unstable and was selectively ubiquitinated and degraded in vivo. This instability was regulated by the differences in the nucleotide coding sequence between the two actin isoforms, which conferred different translation rates. ?-actin was translated more slowly than ?-actin, and this slower processing resulted in the exposure of a normally hidden lysine residue for ubiquitination, leading to the preferential degradation of ?-actin upon arginylation. This degradation mechanism, coupled to nucleotide coding sequence, may regulate protein arginylation in vivo.
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Arginylation regulates intracellular actin polymer level by modulating actin properties and binding of capping and severing proteins.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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Actin arginylation regulates lamella formation in motile fibroblasts, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. To understand how arginylation affects the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the biochemical properties and the structural organization of actin filaments in wild-type and arginyltransferase (Ate1) knockout cells. We found that Ate1 knockout results in a dramatic reduction of the actin polymer levels in vivo accompanied by a corresponding increase in the monomer level. Purified nonarginylated actin has altered polymerization properties, and actin filaments from Ate1 knockout cells show altered interactions with several associated proteins. Ate1 knockout cells have severe impairment of cytoskeletal organization throughout the cell. Thus, arginylation regulates the ability of actin to form filaments in the whole cell rather than preventing the collapse of preformed actin networks at the cell leading edge as proposed in our previous model. This regulation is achieved through interconnected mechanisms that involve actin polymerization per se and through binding of actin-associated proteins.
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Arginylation-dependent neural crest cell migration is essential for mouse development.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
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Coordinated cell migration during development is crucial for morphogenesis and largely relies on cells of the neural crest lineage that migrate over long distances to give rise to organs and tissues throughout the body. Recent studies of protein arginylation implicated this poorly understood posttranslational modification in the functioning of actin cytoskeleton and in cell migration in culture. Knockout of arginyltransferase (Ate1) in mice leads to embryonic lethality and severe heart defects that are reminiscent of cell migration-dependent phenotypes seen in other mouse models. To test the hypothesis that arginylation regulates cell migration during morphogenesis, we produced Wnt1-Cre Ate1 conditional knockout mice (Wnt1-Ate1), with Ate1 deletion in the neural crest cells driven by Wnt1 promoter. Wnt1-Ate1 mice die at birth and in the first 2-3 weeks after birth with severe breathing problems and with growth and behavioral retardation. Wnt1-Ate1 pups have prominent defects, including short palate and altered opening to the nasopharynx, and cranial defects that likely contribute to the abnormal breathing and early death. Analysis of neural crest cell movement patterns in situ and cell motility in culture shows an overall delay in the migration of Ate1 knockout cells that is likely regulated by intracellular mechanisms rather than extracellular signaling events. Taken together, our data suggest that arginylation plays a general role in the migration of the neural crest cells in development by regulating the molecular machinery that underlies cell migration through tissues and organs during morphogenesis.
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Conditional Tek promoter-driven deletion of arginyltransferase in the germ line causes defects in gametogenesis and early embryonic lethality in mice.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2009
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Posttranslational protein arginylation mediated by Ate1 is essential for cardiovascular development, actin cytoskeleton functioning, and cell migration. Ate1 plays a role in the regulation of cytoskeleton and is essential for cardiovascular development and angiogenesis--capillary remodeling driven by in-tissue migration of endothelial cells. To address the role of Ate1 in cytoskeleton-dependent processes and endothelial cell function during development, we produced a conditional mouse knockout with Ate1 deletion driven by Tek endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase promoter expressed in the endothelium and in the germ line. Contrary to expectations, Tek-Ate1 mice were viable and had no visible angiogenesis-related phenotypes; however, these mice showed reproductive defects, with high rates of embryonic lethality in the second generation, at stages much earlier than the complete Ate1 knockout strain. While some of the early lethality originated from the subpopulation of embryos with homozygous Tek-Cre transgene--a problem that has not previously been reported for this commercial mouse strain--a distinct subpopulation of embryos had lethality at early post-implantation stages that could be explained only by a previously unknown defect in gametogenesis originating from Tek-driven Ate1 deletion in premeiotic germs cells. These results demonstrate a novel role of Ate1 in germ cell development.
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Identification of N-terminally arginylated proteins and peptides by mass spectrometry.
Nat Protoc
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2009
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This protocol outlines the essential steps of mass spectrometry-based analysis of protein samples that can be used to identify post-translational arginylation. We describe special considerations for sample preparation and digestion, mass spectrometry analysis using high-precision instruments, database searching for the addition of N-terminal arginine, and multiple steps of automated and manual data validation. Data validation is especially important and involves automated data filtering, manual elimination of mass ambiguities, isotopic peak checking and analysis of the ion fragmentation patterns of the putative arginylated peptides. This protocol is an unambiguous method for the identification of post-translationally arginylated proteins, and it can be used to identify new arginylated proteins. This method provides a definitive answer on the identity of arginylated proteins and peptides in simple and complex protein preparations. It is recommended for studies of arginylation and can be applied to other poorly understood post-translational modifications.
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Post-translational modification and regulation of actin.
Curr. Opin. Cell Biol.
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Many of the best-studied actin regulatory proteins use non-covalent means to modulate the properties of actin. Yet, actin is also susceptible to covalent modifications of its amino acids. Recent work is increasingly revealing that actin processing and its covalent modifications regulate important cellular events. In addition, numerous pathogens express enzymes that specifically use actin as a substrate to regulate their hosts cells. Actin post-translational alterations have been linked to different normal and disease processes and the effects associated with metabolic and environmental stressors. Herein, we highlight specific co-translational and post-translational modifications of actin and discuss the current understanding of the role that these modifications play in regulating actin.
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Arginylation-dependent regulation of a proteolytic product of talin is essential for cell-cell adhesion.
J. Cell Biol.
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Talin is a large scaffolding molecule that plays a major role in integrin-dependent cell-matrix adhesion. A role for talin in cell-cell attachment through cadherin has never been demonstrated, however. Here, we identify a novel calpain-dependent proteolytic cleavage of talin that results in the release of a 70-kD C-terminal fragment, which serves as a substrate of posttranslational arginylation. The intracellular levels of this fragment closely correlated with the formation of cell-cell adhesions, and this fragment localized to cadherin-containing cell-cell contacts. Moreover, reintroduction of this fragment rescued the cell-cell adhesion defects in arginyltransferase (Ate1) knockout cells, which normally have a very low level of this fragment. Arginylation of this fragment further enhanced its ability to rescue cell-cell adhesion formation. In addition, arginylation facilitated its turnover, suggesting a dual role of arginylation in its intracellular regulation. Thus, our work identifies a novel proteolytic product of talin that is regulated by arginylation and a new role of talin in cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion.
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Arginylation regulates myofibrils to maintain heart function and prevent dilated cardiomyopathy.
J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol.
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Protein arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) is essential for heart formation during embryogenesis, however its cell-autonomous role in cardiomyocytes and the differentiated heart muscle has never been investigated. To address this question, we generated cardiac muscle-specific Ate1 knockout mice, in which Ate1 deletion was driven by ?-myosin heavy chain promoter (?MHC-Ate1 mouse). These mice were initially viable, but developed severe cardiac contractility defects, dilated cardiomyopathy, and thrombosis over time, resulting in high rates of lethality after 6months of age. These symptoms were accompanied by severe ultrastructural defects in cardiac myofibrils, seen in the newborns and far preceding the onset of cardiomyopathy, suggesting that these defects were primary and likely underlay the development of the future heart defects. Several major sarcomeric proteins were arginylated in vivo. Moreover, Ate1 deletion in the hearts resulted in a significant reduction of active and passive myofibril forces, suggesting that arginylation is critical for both myofibril structural integrity and contractility. Thus, arginylation is essential for maintaining the heart function by regulation of the major myofibril proteins and myofibril forces, and its absence in the heart muscle leads to progressive heart failure through cardiomyocyte-specific defects.
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Small molecule inhibitors of arginyltransferase regulate arginylation-dependent protein degradation, cell motility, and angiogenesis.
Biochem. Pharmacol.
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Posttranslational arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) is an emerging major regulator of embryogenesis and cell physiology. Impairments of ATE1 are implicated in congenital heart defects, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration making this enzyme an important therapeutic target, whose potential has been virtually unexplored. Here we report the development of a biochemical assay for identification of small molecule inhibitors of ATE1 and application of this assay to screen a library of 3280 compounds. Our screen identified two compounds which specifically affect ATE1-regulated processes in vivo, including tannic acid, which has been previously shown to inhibit protein degradation and angiogenesis and to act as a therapeutic agent in heart disease and cancer. Our data suggest that these actions of tannic acid are mediated by its direct effect on ATE1, which regulates protein degradation and angiogenesis in vivo.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.